Nocover-blank-133x176
An Outline of Intellec...
 
by
Bertrand Russell
Rate this book
Clear rating

An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish: A Hilarious Catalogue of Organized and Individual Stupidity

5.0 of 5 stars 5.00  ·  rating details  ·  1 rating  ·  1 review
Kindle Edition
Published (first published 1943)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.
This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-3 of 3)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Knigel Holmes
Bertrand Russell analyses the rubbish behind many beliefs from religion to politics and then gives a few tools to help reduce our own rubbish beliefs. I found the essay to be a fantastic read and excellent advice for critical thinking.

Found it here: http://www.personal.kent.edu/~rmuhamm...
Brandon Matthews
Brandon Matthews marked it as to-read
Feb 13, 2014
Paul
Paul marked it as to-read
Jan 08, 2014
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
17854
Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS, was a Welsh philosopher, historian, logician, mathematician, advocate for social reform, pacifist, and prominent rationalist. Although he was usually regarded as English, as he spent the majority of his life in England, he was born in Wales, where he also died.

He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1950 "in recognition of his var...more
More about Bertrand Russell...
A History of Western Philosophy Why I Am Not a Christian and Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects The Problems of Philosophy The Conquest of Happiness Religion and Science

Share This Book

“It is a curious and painful fact that almost all the completely futile treatments that have been believed in during the long history of medical folly have been such as caused acute suffering to the patient. When anesthetics were discovered, pious people considered them an attempt to evade the will of God. It was pointed out, however, that when God extracted Adam's rib He put him into a deep sleep. This proved that anesthetics are all right for men; women, however, ought to suffer, because of the curse of Eve.” 2 likes
“When Benjamin Franklin invented the lightning-rod, the clergy, both in England and America, with the enthusiastic support of George III, condemned it as an impious attempt to defeat the will of God. For, as all right-thinking people were aware, lightning is sent by God to punish impiety or some other grave sin—the virtuous are never struck by lightning. Therefore if God wants to strike any one, Benjamin Franklin [and his lightning-rod] ought not to defeat His design; indeed, to do so is helping criminals to escape. But God was equal to the occasion, if we are to believe the eminent Dr. Price, one of the leading divines of Boston. Lightning having been rendered ineffectual by the 'iron points invented by the sagacious Dr. Franklin,' Massachusetts was shaken by earthquakes, which Dr. Price perceived to be due to God's wrath at the 'iron points.' In a sermon on the subject he said,' In Boston are more erected than elsewhere in New England, and Boston seems to be more dreadfully shaken. Oh! there is no getting out of the mighty hand of God.' Apparently, however, Providence gave up all hope of curing Boston of its wickedness, for, though lightning-rods became more and more common, earthquakes in Massachusetts have remained rare.” 1 likes
More quotes…