Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Mousenet” as Want to Read:
Mousenet
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Mousenet

by
3.9 of 5 stars 3.90  ·  rating details  ·  297 ratings  ·  47 reviews
When ten-year-old Megan helps her uncle invent the Thumbtop, the world's smallest computer, mice are overjoyed, and they want one for every mouse hole.

The Big Cheese, leader of the Mouse Nation, has orders: follow that girl-even if it means high-tailing it to Megan's new home on the other side of the country. While Megan struggles as the new girl, the mice watch, waiting f
...more
Hardcover, 400 pages
Published November 8th 2011 by Disney-Hyperion
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Mousenet, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Mousenet

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 582)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Deborah
Ten-year old Megan and her mom have just returned to the United States after living on a remote island as they conducted two years of sheep research. Once in Ohio, Megan helps her uncle invent the world's smallest computer. But the "Thumbtop" is so small it is the perfect size for mice! Will Uncle Fred's latest invention end up on the trash pile? Not if the Mouse Nation can help it. In Prudence Breitrose's world, mice have evolved and are computer literate. Mice post on "MouseBook," communicate ...more
Alice T
I may have a slightly soft spot for little mice that do pirouettes when they're happy but this was a well written cute book. From the description of the book, the main topic is about how mice could get tiny laptops for their use. What it doesn't mention is the underlying problems and eventual solutions for the main character, Megan. Megan's parents are divorced and has spent most of her life with her mother. A new research trip sends Megan's mother to Australia and forces Megan to stay with her ...more
Heather
Review of an advance reader copy:
I wasn't so sure how I felt about this book for the first few chapters. In fact, I was kind of afraid I would be bored. Oh, not so! The story really picks up once we meet TM3, also known as Trey. And I love the idea of a very advanced mouse civilization which has their own sign language (MSL, or Mouse Sign Language) and knows how to use computers. They also have a fabulous communication network, thanks to those computers, so the mice can literally accomplish anyt
...more
Terry Galanoy
Move over Mickey--there's a new mouse-a lot of them--in town. Sure, mice are one of the timeless staples of young folk literature but not mice like Prue Breitrose's breed. Here are those time-proven lovable critters updated to our technological times. They are organized into sociological and professional clans with a leader, are not only computer literate but capable of computer programming, and have created communication to and from some warm and compassionate young people whose search for love ...more
Lindsay
I really liked this story because it dealt with a lot of different themes, such as being the new kid, blended families, making friendships (with mice and people!), research (what kids' books discuss the benefits of using surveys to gain a sense of the public's opinion?), and environmental themes, such as climate control and the slow food movement. I also enjoyed that Megan, an elementary-aged girl, works alongside a step-cousin, a boy in middle school.

I didn't particularly like the ending; I th
...more
Rachel
An event of epic proportions! Mousekind has gone digital. Breitrose puts her tale of a small mouse contacting a young girl on a grand scale. It is up to these two to usher in a new age for mice and for humankind too. For the most part, the tone is lighthearted with plenty of things to squeal about. The pure cuteness is epitomized by the pirouette, "smiles", the mice do. Their actions and observations of humans serve as the basis of the humour. Where the tone changes is in the content itself; fam ...more
Sister C
When I picked up Mousenet, I thought I was going to be reading about mice and computers. Somewhere around the middle of the book, it felt like the author switched to a book about how mice use computers to save the environment. Don't get me wrong - I understand and agree that we need to take care of the Earth. But if I wanted to read about climate change and going green, I would have read that book. I wanted to read about mice and computers, which is what the short description seemed to promise.

A
...more
amalia M
I had just finished the series Hunger games and i had that filling you can sometimes get when you just read a really good book like you could never find a good book again. I was in the library and i saw a book just sitting in the shelf so i was like maybe this could be a good book. So i went home and i started reading it. This is a really good book. I would recommend this book to whoever likes books with talking animals.
Angela
This was so much more than I was expecting! The cover illustration and the start of the story led me to expect a sort of cutsie or simplistic book but, instead, this was a well-thought out "what if". The world of mice that Breitrose has created is facinating! This book has humor, betrayal, forgiveness, ethics, and creativity. I highly recommend it!
Alvin
Mar 22, 2013 Alvin added it
Delightful, my eleven year old checked it out of the library, I wouldn't let him return it until I could read it too.
Angie
Mice are the second most intelligent species on the planet; they got smarter after learning about computers. But computers are too big for them; it takes a lot of mice to operate a computer. The solution: the Thumbtop, the world's tiniest computer, perfect for mice. And the mice want one in every mousehole. The only problem is convincing the humans to help the mice. The Thumbtop was invented by Fred and his niece Megan. Megan just got back from spending two years on an island studying sheep with ...more
P.M.
Megan Miller has spent time on s semi-deserted island while her scientist mother did research on climate change. You'd think nothing would frighten her but you'd be wrong. When she hears that her mother is heading to the Australian Outback without her to research hairy-nosed wombats, Megan is terrified because she will have to attend public school and live with her father and unmet stepmother. The plot thickens when Uncle Fred gives her a Thumbtop, a miniature computer that is a perfect fit for ...more
Andy Shuping
ARC provided by netGalley

Mice are the second most intelligent species on the planet earth, after humans of course. Only no one knows this. And the mice can’t change this because they have a problem. They don’t have a computer that is their size! That is...until the day an inventor comes up with one small enough for them. But how do the mice get their hands on it? And how can they mass produce the computer for all the mice across the world!? A plan begins to come together when the inventor’s niec
...more
Heather
I picked this book up as an uncorrect proof version at a convention. I wasn't terribly interested in the topic of mice using computers but I really loved this book. Megan and her mom are in Clevland between environmental work jobs staying with Megan's uncle. She helps as her uncle, an inventor, builds a tiny laptop. The mice in her uncle's house look on with amazement as they are quite avid internet users and have to go to a lot of work to use big human computers. Megan's mom gets news that she ...more
Betsy
3.5 stars

I liked this book, but it took a wee bit to get into, and it needs to be shorter! It's a good fit for Intermediate grades (3rd-5th) thematically and plot-wise; it's not as "mature" as many middle grades titles. But it's so LONG.

And, while it's a cute story, it's going to feel very outdated soon. The book hinges on the this mouse-sized laptop (the Thumbtop), and specific technology always dates a book soon. In fact, even a Blackberry is mentioned in one part. It will hold up for a few mo
...more
Caitlintobin
I liked the story at the beginning. I was bored after about 1/4 of the book. The story is about an entire underground mouse world that is capable of using computers and accomplishing pretty sophisticated tasks (like changing global warming). They need a little human help. Specifically, they need Megan's tiny thumbtop computer mass produced.

The problems Megan encountered dragged on way too long. The writing is not that interesting, and the one detail about Megan's crazy hair that the author ment
...more
Steve
A cute book for 10-year-olds. Heavy-handed on the climate change message, even when I happen to agree with it.
Ellie
I currently own this book and I have read it about 3 times. So far, I have not gotten bored of it.
Joshua Nichols
Joshua said he would rate this 6 stars if he could.
Meredith
I am still reading it but it is so GOOD!
Thalia
I used to be so obsessed with this book
Au Lait Cru
Actual rating: 4.5 stars. My 10 year old daughter LOVED this book and thought it was one of the cutest things she's ever read. She thinks that advanced 8 year olds (3rd grade) would enjoy it, and that kids all the way up to 11 or 12 would too. Probably not for more sophisticated young adult (age 12+) though. When asked how many stars I should give it she said an unqualified 5, but since I haven't read it I will round 4.5 stars down to 4.
Barbara Stroer
A current SSYRA winner, appropriate for fourth or fifth grade. This is a wacky little story about a little girl who is given a gift of a tiny computer by her inventor uncle. Unbeknownst to her, mice have been studying humans and technology for years and they know the computer is perfect for them. They set about to befriend the girl and get her to help them get computers. This was a cute story but a little too far fetched for it to really be one of my favorites. It is sprinkled with technology th ...more
Brenda
This was a very cute book. I liked the mice very much especially. There is so much that was cute about them...their mouse sign language, a few mice that have the capability of human speech, how they would pirouette when they were happy, and much more. I can't wait to read the sequel (Mousemobile). The only thing that bothered me a little was how much they mentioned global warming but overall it didn't bother me too much.
Emmaleigh
A cute story with a good bit of magic that is sure to entertain younger audience members. There are also good life lessons with hard work and honesty woven into the story which are great. The story drags on for much longer than it needs to. It's about 200 pages longer than it needs to be. The outcome of the story is extremely obvious and every event of the story is predictable. However, it is a cute story with good messages.
Caroline
It was slow to get my excited. The only thing that kept me reading was the topic. It was only about halfway through the book that I finally got interested.
Suzanne
This book was a fun read. It has the same flavor as Elise Broach's book Masterpiece and the book Nest for Celeste in that it introduces us to creatures who think and reason like and with humans.

I loved reading about mice who could run computers and how they masterminded a scheme to get a thumbtop (mouse-sized laptop) in every mousehole!

Very fun read.
Dandelionsteph
The climate change message was heavy-handed and repetitive, and wasn't even necessary to the plot.

The most exciting parts was when Joey was suspicious of Megan. When everything was explained to Joey and he was on Megan's side, the story became boring.

The plot wasn't strong. It was something like an extra-long Ralph S. Mouse.
Lucas
Aug 02, 2013 Lucas rated it 5 of 5 stars
Shelves: 2013
Mousenet is right up there with The Mouse and the Motorcycle in terms of a cute mouse (Trey) that made me wish all mice could talk. Until one makes contact with me, I'll have to settle for reading about it in a great book. I can't wait until I read the next one. This book will be a great addition to my 5th grade class library.
.meo.moe.
Welp i finished it. I skimmed a lot but yeah
I really like mice that do big pirouettes when they're happy ok.
But i will say this is not one of those kids books that grabbed me, and kept me reading. It was cute, but for little kids only, not one of the rare kids books that everyone would love. Still, really adorable.
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 19 20 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • Double Dog Dare
  • Thomas and the Dragon Queen
  • The Five Lives of Our Cat Zook
  • Melonhead
  • The Wish Stealers
  • The Year of the Book
  • Elvis and the Underdogs
  • Waiting for the Magic
  • Lulu and the Duck in the Park
  • The Cheshire Cheese Cat: A Dickens of a Tale
  • The Adventures of a South Pole Pig: A novel of snow and courage
  • The Mysterious Woods of Whistle Root
  • Glory Be
  • Squid and Octopus Friends for Always
  • Floors
  • Smells Like Dog
  • Popular Clone: The Clone Chronicles #1
  • Fake Mustache
4848940
Grew up in Winnie-The-Pooh country. Studied modern languages at Cambridge University, then went into journalism on magazines (including one for children under six)and newspapers, then into British television as a producer and director.

After moving to California and marrying a Stanford professor, I worked as a writer in health education until I had a dream that confused computer mice with the real
...more
More about Prudence Breitrose...
Mousemobile Mousemobile (A Mousenet Book)

Share This Book

No trivia or quizzes yet. Add some now »