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Wolf Mark

3.6 of 5 stars 3.60  ·  rating details  ·  318 ratings  ·  72 reviews
Luke King knows a lot of things. Like four different ways to disarm an enemy before the attacker can take a breath. Like every detail of every book he’s ever read. And Luke knows enough—just enough—about what his father does as a black ops infiltrator to know which questions not to ask. Like why does his family move around so much?

Luke just hopes that this time his family
...more
Hardcover, 377 pages
Published October 1st 2011 by Tu Books (first published September 15th 2011)
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The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman AlexieCinder by Marissa MeyerEleanor & Park by Rainbow RowellSecrets of the Realm by Bev StoutThe Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Diversity in Young Adult and Middle Grade
102nd out of 888 books — 557 voters
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251st out of 526 books — 496 voters


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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 914)
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Jo
Aug 22, 2011 Jo marked it as gave-up-on
Shelves: for-review, ya, e, own
OK, Luke.
When you get angry you growl . You can smell your classmates. You have to shave once a day because you have excessive facial hair . The creepy Russian kids who have graduated from the 'Die Hard School of Villains' who seem to know more than they are letting on call you mongrel . You have a wolf birthmark on your wrist that burns when you get angry. You love the moon .... especially when it's full . You like to run through the wilderness . You ride a motorcycle (why do they a
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Ari
I wanted to like this book. The first book published by Tu Books, an imprint whose mission I adore. I have really liked previous books by Joseph Bruchac and yet Wolf Mark was a disappointment for me. First, this book commits one of my little pet peeves which is short but many chapters. There are 73 chapters, 374 pages and about five pages per chapter. I think that's a waste of a chapter, especially since each chapter ended SO DRAMATICALLY which was pointless. Why end with a cliffhanger when the ...more
Kris
Review copied from original post at Imaginary Reads

What I liked about it: There aren't enough books that delve into the cultures of various ethnic groups. Wolf Mark's romantic interest is Muslim, and the main character both knows quite a bit about Russians and goes to school with a group of Russians. I appreciate Bruchac's inclusion of detail about these cultures. This was the main attraction of the novel for me--besides the new take on werewolves.

What I didn't like about it: The short, terse se
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Angie
High school senior Luke has a dead mother, a drunken, doped-out father, and a serious crush on a good Pakistani girl. He and his dad now live in a tin can of a beatup trailer in a town that's on it's way down the economic slide. He's trying to stay under the radar at his latest school and just graduate. But, when the Sunglass Mafia shows up and starts ruling the school, he knows something's happening out of the usual. And, boy, does it. His dad gets kidnapped, and after he gets his dad's coded m ...more
Sharon Tyler
Wolf Mark by Joseph Bruchac is a children's novel with the expected publication date of September 28 2011. This book will appeal to guys and girls around nine through their teens. The novel offers a unique take on legends paired with espionage and a variety of cultures. Luke King has a mixed heritage, and knows a great deal about a variety of other cultures because of his upbringing. His parents taught him about his Native American heritage, but thanks to his father working undercover, he also k ...more
Francesca Forrest
Read this in slow time w/younger son. We had a lot of fun with it and enjoyed the characters, but in part in it was because of amused exasperation with the hero's over-the-top references to his own special powers and uniqueness. He's familiar with Russian street slang? Of course he is. Bestest-best at martial arts? Goes without saying. Keen, keen senses? You didn't expect any less, did you? Sometimes too, the author's teacherly mode overwhelms the protagonist's voice, as he tells us about, say, ...more
Cindy Fesemyer
Feb 09, 2012 Cindy Fesemyer rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: YA guys
Wolf Mark is the second book I've read from Tu Books, an imprint of Lee & Low. Tu Books is an imprint to watch. Here's a snippet from their website:

"Fantasy, science fiction, and mystery: these genres draw in young readers like no other. Yet it is in these genres that readers of color might feel most like an outsider, given that such a large percentage features white characters (when they feature human characters). It is the goal of Tu Books to publish genre books for children and young adul
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Rachel Brown
Luke knows enough just enough about what his father does as a black ops infiltrator to know which questions not to ask. But when his dad goes missing, Luke realizes that life will always be different for him. Suddenly he must avoid the kidnappers looking to use him as leverage against his father, while at the same time evading the attention of the school's mysterious elite clique of Russian hipsters.

This YA novel is even more fun than the cover copy implies, throwing together werewolves, Indian
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Maria Kramer
A teen boy has a dysfunctional family (of the dead mom/drunk dad variety) and a crush on his cute Pakistani friend. Oh, and a wolf tattoo that burns and throbs occasionally. Nothing weird about that I'm sure!

So yeah, there's nothing about the premise I dislike, but the author's writing style was like fingernails on a chalkboard to me. It's like no force on earth can stop him from going off on a tangent every five sentences. In my book, that's only ok if you're William Faulkner or Neal Stephenson
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Jordan Blair
Wolf Mark
Have you ever wondered what it’s like to think, act, and have the abilities like that of a wolf? Well, the book Wolf Mark written by Joseph Bruchac gives you such a strong image, it makes you actually feel like you are a wolf. The genre of this book would be something similar to fantasy, considering the fact that a boy basically gets wolf powers. In the book, 17 year old Luke King is separated from his father, when his father is kidnapped by his enemies from a former business. Luke di
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Alyssa Caraballo
Mark of wolf is a AMAZING book. Its an young adult book. I just love it its the best book ever.

It's about a boy his name is Lucas king . He's dad works under cover. He is trying to be normal . Also he was a crush on a long time friend. He was also born a birth mark that looks like a wolf. But when his dad has been captured that same day that somebody burns down his traitor. So now it's up to Lucas king to save his family and the girl he loves on the way he learns secrets about him self and othe
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Natalie
Luke lives with his dad in a trailer home in Rangerville, one of the few places they've stayed long enough for Luke to make friends. His dad is in a drunk stupor most of the time, mourning the death of Luke's mother.

One night Luke dreams he's at an abandoned house, confronting a monster known in his head as a 'grue' and everything changes. His dad is alert and awake. Luke goes to school the next day and he gets a phone call. It's a coded message from his dad who's been kidnapped.

Luke is thrown i
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Nicole Wolverton
Wolf Mark begs some obvious comparisons on different levels. The most obvious is the whole Jacob-shape shifter storyline in Twilight. Like that storyline, Wolf Mark uses Native American wolf lore to form the backbone of who Luke is--a skinwalker. I found Wolf Mark use of the legends much more interesting and nuanced than Twilight, though--and it was put to much better use. And since I also recently read Allen Zadoff's Unknown Assassin series, there are also a few similarities there.

Overall, I en
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Michele
Published by Lee & Low, "Wolf Mark" is noted as a novel that meets and, I would say, exceeds the goals of diversity. The main character, Luke, is of Abenaki and European descent, but identifies most as Native American, his love interest is a Pakistani girl (very intelligent), and his best friend is a second generation Italian (sort of a geeky, music, type, but loyal). The story also involves Russian vampire spies, but don't let that stop you from reading the book. I am so very impressed with ...more
Jennifer
Interesting mix of sci-fi with a touch of fantasy. Felt like it could use some editing. Too much telling and not showing. Almost like Bruchac felt he needed to teach several lessons along the way.
Andrea at Reading Lark
Review Posted on Reading Lark 8/18/11: http://readinglark.blogspot.com/2011/...

Wolf Mark is a fast paced adrenaline treat for your brain. This book oozes with suspense and keeps you on the edge of your seat. Wolf Mark is the paranormal version of X-Men with gifted supernaturals fighting against a large corporation that wants to prey on their genetic mutations to create a superior army of killing machines.

Wolf Mark will appeal to both male and female readers as the main character, Luke, tells the
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Kate McMurry
Wonderful YA, urban fantasy with male protagonist

Luke, the teenage male protagonist of Wolf Mark, is an American Indian of the Abenaki tribe. His mother died some years ago, and he lives in a dilapidated trailer with his alcoholic father who used to do some kind of highly secretive work in years past that left him emotionally scarred. Even so, Luke's father apparently is an amazing warrior, because at some point he taught Luke impressive skills of survival.

At school, Luke cares deeply for a Paki
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Bethany
If you’re a fan of action-adventure stories, the darker edge of paranormal, believe there is an element of truth behind every conspiracy theory, and enjoy first-person stories told in an original voice, then I’d recommend reading this one...and here's why:

1. Luke – he’s engaging, intelligent, observant, and flat-out funny. I loved his narrative voice, and even during the expositional portions of the story my interest never flagged.

2. Motorcycle chases, safety deposit boxes, an old mysterious hou
...more
Scott
Wolfmark takes a non-typical approach to werewolves and it works. It includes an interesting mixture of Native American culture and mythology blended into a contemporary story about a young boy named Luke. As a typical teenager Luke has to deal with problems with friends, at school, and with his father who uses alcohol to deal with the loss of Luke's mother. But when Luke finds out who he really is he has to start making decisions like an adult, and he must learn to control the wolf.

The pacing i
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Scarlett
Originally posted on my blog here.

It's hard to say what caught my attention first about this book. I love wolves, werewolves in particular; the premise sounded engaging; the cover simple but catching (though yellow and red aren't my favorite colors together, this seems to work).

Once I started the book I found it interesting, particularly in that we are inside the head of Luke and he is quite a knowledgeable kid. All his little tidbits and asides were one part fascinating (I'll admit it, I took s
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Andrew
I liked this book a lot because of the fantasy and adventure. There were fighting scenes but thats not why I liked the book. I love to read books that expand my imagination and that is what this book did. I liked it because there was team work and a bad guy to fight. A maze of clues to find out the problem.
The book was about a boy and his father. It is about his journey in learning his true self. His father was a man in the FBI and was very secretive. He was captured and bad people wanted the
...more
Adrienne
Luke King has always been different—how could he not be when he’s grown up with a CIA agent for a father? Now, though, his mother has died and he and his father are living in a trailer, Luke attending the local high school and his father escaping his pain with drugs and alcohol. Add in the fact that Luke seems to just kill all modern electronic devices (they shut down when he’s around) and the wolf mark on his left arm, and he’s pretty different. And soon, his life becomes not only different but ...more
Krystal
http://livetoread-krystal.blogspot.co...

Luke, the main character, will draw the reader into this novel. His life has been secretive up to this point, he has to deal with the knowledge that his father is a black ops infiltrator and that he has a strange wolf mark on his wrist. He has always tried to blend in, but his attempts are not always successful-especially when his father mysteriously disappears, leaving Luke a target. The action really takes off here as Luke decides that the Russian crowd
...more
Kat O'B
The overall story was ok, with some parts slow but mostly a decent pace. I think middle school students will especially like the main character, Luke. He's a bit of a loner, struggling with some typical teenage issues (such as how to let a girl know he likes her) and dealing with family issues (mom died and dad is alcoholic since then). Luke's dad does some kind of secret work (we learn more later), so Luke has been trained from a young age to blend in and attract no attention to himself. Luke i ...more
Starr Griggs

I received a copy of this galley, free, in exchange for my honest opinion.
Somehow this book got lost in the Netgalley pile (and the review was lost in the pile of written but not posted reviews). Regardless, I was drawn to this book. I visited Tu Books’ website (a family owned publishing company that believes and promotes diversity in science fiction and fantasy for young adults) Now that I have finished reading, I have this strong urge to go back re-read it. I am not sure if that is me just bei
...more
Debbie (at) I Heart YA Books
Wolf Mark is an awesome book. Joseph Bruchac takes you into the mind of Luke, and I do mean literally takes you in the mind of Luke. This story is told from Luke's POV, but you're seeing it all through Luke's perspective, the way his dad has trained him to see the situation. Wolf Mark is total testosterone. Definitely an all guy's storyline. Bruchac does put just a splash of romance in with Luke's feelings for Meena.

Luke just wants to be brave enough to ask Meena to take a ride on his motorcycl
...more
Yasaman
I liked this book in theory, but in practice the first person present tense POV just did not work for me. Despite a fast-paced plot and frequent action, this one was a slog for me to get through.

Bruchac's Wolf Mark was sadly disappointing. I was intrigued by the summary which, no lie, featured the phrase "mysterious elite clique of Russian hipsters." And the plot seemed promising enough. Luke King is a teenager with superhuman senses, strength, and memory. Weirdly enough, he doesn't wonder too m
...more
Charty
On the whole I enjoyed this, especially the call out to the Two Grey Hills Navajo weaving (my parents have a small rug in their house). I also enjoyed the 'Sunglass Mafia' and wished they had been more prominently used. Therein lies the problem. Luke the hero was a nice kid, but despite being a skinwalker (werewolf) he lacked...an edge, for lack of a better word. I don't like my heros to be boring and perfect (nor do I want them to be emo messes) and Luke's life, while not prefect, didn't put an ...more
Hayley
The book had potential. It had a desent beginning and a decent story line but there was a lot of other books not done quite as well put into it. The storyline though good, was hard to follow because there was so much figurative language you didn't know what they were reffering to. I also sometimes found myself daydreaming while he was, which was often.
asha
I don't have a lot to say about this book: no 'OMG it was amazing', and no 'it sucked'. I just want to call attention to all the necessary dog references. And my god, Lucas was so dense! The whole moon thing, motorcycle (this was in one of the other comments but i wanted to mention it again, why do all werewolves have motorcycles?), the super-great-nose, the fighting ability, inhuman strength, the goddam WOLF MARK on his wrist.
That is all! :)

Wait, not all! P.S. TOO MUCH ABOUT MEENA, we get it,
...more
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15337
Joseph Bruchac lives with his wife, Carol, in the Adirondack mountain foothills town of Greenfield Center, New York, in the same house where his maternal grandparents raised him. Much of his writing draws on that land and his Abenaki ancestry. Although his American Indian heritage is only one part of an ethnic background that includes Slovak and English blood, those Native roots are the ones by wh ...more
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