Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “The Vegetable Gardener's Container Bible: How to Grow a Bounty of Food in Pots, Tubs, and Other Containers” as Want to Read:
The Vegetable Gardener's Container Bible: How to Grow a Bounty of Food in Pots, Tubs, and Other Containers
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

The Vegetable Gardener's Container Bible: How to Grow a Bounty of Food in Pots, Tubs, and Other Containers

4.06  ·  Rating Details  ·  391 Ratings  ·  54 Reviews
Harvest tomatoes on a patio, produce a pumpkin in a planter, and grow broccoli on a balcony! Best-selling author Ed Smith shows you everything you need to know to successfully create and care for an edible container garden, from choosing the right plants and selecting appropriate containers through controlling pests without chemicals and harvesting fresh vegetables. You'll ...more
ebook, 265 pages
Published February 28th 2011 by Storey Publishing
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about The Vegetable Gardener's Container Bible, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about The Vegetable Gardener's Container Bible

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 755)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Karen GoatKeeper
I love my earth garden and don't plan to give it up but this book makes turning much of it into a container garden very tempting.
The writing is clear. The explanations are easily understood.
Included are plans for making your own self watering containers, compost, pot mixes and planting suggestions. The pot sizes are not numerical making them a bit vague. They do have amounts of soil contained in the different sizes but that is not easily pictured. At the end of the book is a wonderful listing of
...more
Tarah
Dec 08, 2011 Tarah rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
There are a myriad of really great gardening books out there. But for the best go-to, how-to books, Edward C. Smith is God. Lucky for us, he wrote the Bible. Two of them, actually. Building on his Vegetable Gardener's Bible (which is wonderful) is now the Vegetable Gardener's Container Bible. These books are the best reference books out there on gardening (well, I'm sure the *really, really* big ones that cost a billion dollars probably are, simply because they are more extensive, but for the mo ...more
Stephanie
Jun 09, 2014 Stephanie rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
Apparently I have Squash Vine Borers in my garden. They are really destructive little jerks...

But I did get some nice zucchini before they did their damage. Had some zucchini bread for breakfast.
Shannon
Mar 19, 2014 Shannon rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I found this to be a brilliant resource as I am a beginning gardener with dreams of growing my own food. As someone who needs a step by step on how to start a vegetable garden, I found this book to be invaluable. As a detail oriented person, I appreciated how the book is broken down into chapters about best soil composition, sizes of containers, most satisfying crops (according to the author), etc... In the chapter about the different crops, the author even describes potential pests and how to d ...more
Zacaro Caro
Great advice even if you aren't gardening in containers. I have an "earth garden" as he calls it in this book. But I picked this book up at the library as well because I am thinking about window sill gardens, tomatoes in a container and maybe doing herbs this way. I think I'm going to buy this book, it's very useful--I could tell he wanted to write more on traditional "earth gardens" and he does a good job of explaining what is just good advice for growing in the earth as well while admirably st ...more
Jgrace
The Vegetable Gardener’s Container Bible- E.C.Smith
4 stars

“I do like a good garden book” Amelia Maugery -The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie society

Me, too. I like a good gardening book. Until recently, I didn’t progress much beyond reading books and seed catalogs. But, now that I have some time…. I was looking for some practical advice. Realistically, I’m unlikely to do any gardening that involves heavy labor. I live in a standard suburban tract that is encroaching on Southern California
...more
Samantha Penrose
This book serves as something of a mentor for those who want to grow food, but lack a yard. It's starts out with encouraging words, and quickly gets in to explanations of where to begin.
Chapters are devoted to a single topic such as, choosing the proper containers, the right potting mix, and what special tools and accessories may become necessary.
There is a ton of information about how much space, sunlight, and water that different plants require, as well as insight about what grows well togeth
...more
Janet
Jun 03, 2014 Janet rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book covers the basics of container gardening that many others have, although with a bit more detail. Where this book shines are the detailed descriptions of individual plants (veggies, herbs, flowers) and varieties that are good for containers, along with colored pictures. When I'm ready for container gardening, this will be the book I return to. Container gardening bible is appropriately named.
PennsyLady (Bev)
The Vegetable Gardener's Container Bible: How to Grow a Bounty of Food in Pots, Tubs, and Other Containers (2011)

by Edward C. Smith

softcover reference

"plentiful organic vegetables from small spaces."

We can be assured the Ed and Sylvia Smith have planted, tested, tasted and finally submitted some exciting ideas either to begin or expand your existing gardening.
There are excellent photos, suggested readings, list of suppliers and discussion of hardiness zones.

5 reference.
...more
Elie
Apr 20, 2015 Elie rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: growing
After trying self-watering pots as edward smith recommends, I would have to agree that it is the best way to go! I have killed many potted plants by simply going on vacation for a couple days. Self watering pots solve this problem. between this book and bountiful container, all the information for a full garden in pots is available. Smith has great technique for growing annuals. Bountiful Container discusses perennials (fruit) in addition to annuals.

An outstanding book for the beginner
Includes:
p
...more
Lauren
Dec 22, 2014 Lauren rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I got a lot more out of this than I thought I would. Smith offers suggestions on which vegetables grow better in traditional planters & which ones thrive more in self-watering ones which I found very helpful.
Brad DeMaagd
May 31, 2016 Brad DeMaagd rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Fit the bill.

Fit the bill. My father waamts t



My father wants to start learning how to grow some of his own food. Thorough starting point is this book



Ruth
Jun 16, 2015 Ruth rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I've browsed gardening books before, only to dismiss them as impractical or unhelpful. I'm not an avid gardener (if anything, I'm a black thumb, and I live in an area with inadequate lighting outside my home).

But this book is so promising that I vowed to purchase it. It really fills in all the gaps I'd noticed from other books. It explains things so clearly that I have hope that even I can do this! Of course, we shall see. But at least I can't complain that I don't have a good resource anymore.
Tonya
Apr 25, 2015 Tonya rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
This book was very helpful, as I started my container garden. I'm a renter, so always have to use container gardens. This gave great tips on what I could mix in my containers, as well as what kind of containers would be good to use.
Lulu
Mar 03, 2012 Lulu rated it it was amazing
Shelves: gardening
About ten years ago we moved back to the inner city from the country, where we grew everything imaginable in our huge garden.
We have a fairly decent sized backyard (33x40) for a Centretown lot, but I'm always looking for new ideas to enable me to cram in more vegetables and fruits.
While I'm not big on the idea of planting in plastic, those tupperware containers are clever! I've got the bins and power-tools... all I need is some good earth to replace the road dust that makes up our garden.
I ga
...more
Patrick Paquet
Jul 18, 2015 Patrick Paquet rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
It was my go to for my garden this year living in a 3rd floor apartment.
Karen
Apr 10, 2013 Karen rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
If you've read the first one in this series, Vegetable Gardener's Bible, then the container version is great for people with small spaces like a balcony, or those seeking to extend the amount of useable space they have in their backyards. Be forewarned though, those of us that have already read the first title, a lot of the information contained herein is the same. That said, the tricks and tips for container gardening are invaluable, including how to create your own self watering pots. All in a ...more
Aija
Apr 07, 2011 Aija rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: gardening
Mainly it is assumed that everyone will use self-watering containers for most plants which does not need drought to show their best:). And this is also ok, because there are few guides with photos how to build yourself as commercial self-watering containers are pretty expensive. Just be prepared.
Also be aware that for many plants the author suggests to buy seedlings from local shop as it is hard or takes a lot of time to grow by yourself. However, some notes are mentioned if you decide to try ne
...more
Amber Adkins
Mar 09, 2011 Amber Adkins rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: gardening
This book seems like a reprint of his previous book on container gardening just with a new title and cover. The idea is that even with just a small amount of space, like a little balcony, you can grow vegetables but then almost all the vegetables he recommends need large containers. Not very helpful for people who really don't have very much space to work with. (He grows his container vegetables in his large yard alongside traditional garden beds.) Not a bad book, just personally a little disapp ...more
Sara Q
Great introduction to self-watering containers, including how to make your own. Very personable and lightly humorous voice in the writing. He gives his honest opinion about plants and strategies for a container garden, but also recognizes that your mileage may vary. Plenty of photos that actually illustrate what is being discussed on the pages. I found the book especially helpful since his experience is as a gardener in Vermont - a place with a similar short growing season like Bend's.
Sarah
Mar 23, 2012 Sarah rated it it was amazing
Shelves: 2012
This is exactly what I was looking for in a container gardening book!! My favorite part is the last third of the book, which lists individual veggies followed by what size pot to use, how to plant, how to harvest, what bugs to watch out for...I also really like that the author marked which vegetables actually do better in a container than an earth garden. This book has filled me with enough enthusiasm to attempt to re-start my sad, failed herb garden...I'm sure I'll regret this.
N.L. Riviezzo
A fairly informative book although I was saddened by the constant mention of the 'earth garden' to increase yield, etc. I was hoping for information that helped increase the yield from a container garden and a container garden alone. It does give some useful information as far as best plant types, soil and the like including ways to make self-watering planters which made me happy.
PennsyLady (Bev)
softcover reference

"plentiful organic vegetables from small spaces."

We can be assured the Ed and Sylvia Smith have planted, tested, tasted and finally submitted some exciting ideas either to begin or expand your existing gardening.
There are excellent photos, suggested readings, list of suppliers and discussion of hardiness zones.

5 reference.
...more
Amy
Apr 28, 2011 Amy rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Great book! It provided a lot of detailed info. about what plants do best in sun, shade, etc. as well as what pots to use, how often to water, pests and control, etc.

Before I read this book, I had only grown mint / spearmint in containers -- now I'm ready to experiment with some other things -- perhaps tomatoes or cukes or some spices.
Tressa
Dec 02, 2011 Tressa rated it really liked it
Shelves: non-fiction
I found this book very educational. I had never thought of self-watering containers before and am now quite intrigued with implementing the practice. I also liked the author's suggestions on plants for containers. I thought the book was nicely laid out and arranged with each chapter building upon the previous chapter.
Latasha
This was by far the best book on container gardens I have found. Of course with a north facing townhome that gets about 4 hours of direct sunlight in a day, it's a constant problem. But this book went by container, light, water needs, and had a great layout for figuring out which foods we can grow here. Finally!
Tamara
Well-organized. Descriptive pictures. Describes containers, than soil, then veggies. I might try carrots this year.

The most helpful tidbit: Use buckets as containers. You can usually find plastic buckets (like those that store drywall compound or litter) for free with some scrounging.
Leslie
Apr 10, 2012 Leslie rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Nice layout, lots of helpful photos and informative content. Good advice on how to choose, and even make your own, self-watering containers, selecting the right plants (veggies, flowers or herbs) and where to locate the container for the best results.
Westerville
Mar 09, 2012 Westerville rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: adults, non-fiction
Well-organized. Descriptive pictures. Describes containers, than soil, then veggies. I might try carrots this year. - Tamara, Web Librarian

Reserve a library copy!
Serity
May 11, 2011 Serity rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
i've always wondered why the vegetables on my back porch don't produce hardly anything! this book has given me some great insights on how to do things better. i really love the last chapter that lists his favorite plants for containers.
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 25 26 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • McGee & Stuckey's Bountiful Container: A Container Garden of Vegetables, Herbs, Fruits and Edible Flowers
  • Sugar Snaps and Strawberries: Simple Solutions for Creating Your Own Small-Space Edible Garden
  • Grow Great Grub: Organic Food from Small Spaces
  • The Year-Round Vegetable Gardener: How to Grow Your Own Food 365 Days a Year, No Matter Where You Live
  • The Complete Compost Gardening Guide: Banner Batches, Grow Heaps, Comforter Compost, and Other Amazing Techniques for Saving Time and Money, and Producing the Most Flavorful, Nutritious Vegetables Ever
  • Vertical Vegetables & Fruit: Creative Gardening Techniques for Growing Up in Small Spaces
  • Vertical Gardening: Grow Up, Not Out, for More Vegetables and Flowers in Much Less Space
  • Paradise Lot: Two Plant Geeks, One-Tenth of an Acre, and the Making of an Edible Garden Oasis in the City
  • The Heirloom Life Gardener: The Baker Creek Way of Growing Your Own Food Easily and Naturally
  • Carrots Love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening
  • Beautiful No-Mow Yards: 50 Amazing Lawn Alternatives
  • Your Farm in the City: An Urban Dweller's Guide to Growing Food and Raising Animals
  • Small Scale Grain Raising: An Organic Guide to Growing, Processing, and Using Nutritious Whole Grains, for Home Gardeners and Local Farmers
  • Homegrown Whole Grains: Grow, Harvest, and Cook Wheat, Barley, Oats, Rice, Corn and More
  • The Self-Sufficient Gardener
  • The Edible Front Yard: The Mow-Less, Grow-More Plan for a Beautiful, Bountiful Garden
  • Landscaping with Fruit: Strawberry ground covers, blueberry hedges, grape arbors, and 39 other luscious fruits to make your yard an edible paradise.
  • The Edible Balcony: Growing Fresh Produce in the Heart of the City
Edward C. Smith tends a garden of over 1,500 square feet filled with raspberries, blueberries, flowers, herbs, and nearly 100 varieties of vegetables, including some heirlooms, in his home state of Vermont.
More about Edward C. Smith...

Share This Book