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No One Had a Tongue to Speak: The Untold Story of One of History's Deadliest Floods
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No One Had a Tongue to Speak: The Untold Story of One of History's Deadliest Floods

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4.32 of 5 stars 4.32  ·  rating details  ·  19 ratings  ·  3 reviews
On August 11, 1979, after a week of extraordinary monsoon rains in the Indian state of Gujarat, the two mile-long Machhu Dam-II disintegrated. The waters released from the dam's massive reservoir rushed through the heavily populated downstream area, devastating the industrial city of Morbi and its surrounding agricultural villages. As the torrent's thirty-foot-tall leading ...more
Hardcover, 411 pages
Published May 24th 2011 by Prometheus Books (first published January 1st 2011)
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Non-fiction Disaster Books
37th out of 96 books — 122 voters
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Historical Weather Events
5th out of 25 books — 15 voters


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Joy
A vivid, thought-provoking tale of a natural disaster and the ensuing relief and recovery efforts, shifting of blame, and socioeconomic implications. Bravo for entering into the public memory a tale that might soon have been forgotten.
Bethany
I wavered between 3 and 4 stars, so let's go with 3.5. This type of book is very important, since it allows a non academic like myself to learn about a historic disaster. The writing is actually quite good, and thankfully simple, allowing me to follow the story without previous knowledge of dams, engineering, Indian surname conventions, or the Indian government. They could have easily gotten bogged down in explanations or tangents about these topics, but they chose not to, and the result is a cl ...more
Mark E. Smith
Important to understanding how governments plan large projects without regard to the potential human consequences.
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