The Stone Canal (The Fall Revolution, #2)
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The Stone Canal (The Fall Revolution #2)

3.89 of 5 stars 3.89  ·  rating details  ·  770 ratings  ·  34 reviews
"So it's true what they say: information wants to be free!" But the information in question, in this case, is Dee Model, a sexy, butt-kicking, love-slave android who's just mysteriously become self-aware, eluded her owner, and filed for her own autonomy. And the person making the remark (ironic given that it's a centuries-old reference) is Ax Terminal, a "freelance profess...more
Paperback, 352 pages
Published October 1st 1997 by Legend (first published 1996)
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Pearce Hansen
Pros: Original, quality writing, with an eye for detail and a driving story arc
Cons: None whatsoever

"The Stone Canal" takes place in the same future universe Mr.MacLeod's previous novels have described: a post-Singularity Solar System infested with uploaded 'Fast Folk,' anarcho-capitalist escaped slaves in their extra-solar breakaway republic, Marxist mercenaries and orbital armies protecting the nano-technological 'climax community' utopia that Earth has become . . .

I won't give away the plot....more
Dokusha
Zu Beginn hat mich der Stil dieses Buches etwas verwirrt, aber nach einer Weile hatte ich mich hineingelesen, und danach gefiel es mir deutlich besser.
Eines der vorherrschenden Themen der Geschichte ist die Auseinandersetzung mit künstlichen Intelligenzen, und inwiefern diese als echte Individuen angesehen werden müssen oder können.
Daneben geht es um die Entwicklung auf der Erde in technischer und politischer Hinsicht (das Buch hat hier eine Erzählperspektive von Jahrhunderten) sowie um die Gesc...more
Kristin Lieber
This book is a weird genre of technology-economics science fiction. The author is clearly really intelligent. The book has many smart ideas and references, many of which I didn't understand.

Despite not feeling like I really got it, I liked the book and the story was engaging. A group of dead humans have colonized New Mars resurrecting themselves in bodies grown from DNA. They coexist with robots of varying degrees of cognition, some very human. Humans have solved many problems of the human condi...more
Tom Nixon
This is the third Ken Macleod book I've reviewed in what seems to be a very short time, so I'll skip the usual plaudits- regular and semi-regular readers of the blog should be well aware of them by now. 1. He's an awesome writer, 2. He writes thought-provoking science fiction which is the best kind of science fiction and 3. He is well worth reading.

Now that's out of the way- The Stone Canal. The second book in Macleod's Fall Revolution series (I'm reading these all ass backwards, I know. I'm sor...more
Howard
Before reviewing Stone Canal, I have to confess that I really disliked Star Faction, its prequel. The nuances of political ideologies and their almost ridiculous preeminence in his character portraits deeply distract me from the fabulous concepts he can bring to his stories. In Stone Canal, I found the beginning almost unbearable - an exploration of early friendship and political ideologies (socialism, libertarianism, etc.) of the main characters. As the novel progresses, however, these shallow...more
Aaron Arnold
This came off as a science-fiction lover's science-fiction novel, and so I liked it a lot, even if there weren't a lot of "big ideas" per se.

The narrative is split in two between the "present day" of the protagonist's life from the 70s to the near future, and the far future on New Mars where his mysteriously rejuvenated self has to intervene in a major political dispute, with alternating chapters helping to bring some structural tension as more and more backstory is slowly revealed. Jonathan Wil...more
Simon Mcleish
Originally published on my blog here in December 2000.

The two interlocking narratives which make up The Stone Canal concern libertarian anarchist Jonathan Wilde. The earlier chronologically starts when he is a student at Glasgow University in the 1970s, and basically deals with his gradual development into a political guru as Western capitalism begins to fall apart in the twenty first century. The other narrative is set in the far future, when a clone of Jonathan Wilde is given his memories, cop...more
Kristin
This book is a weird genre of technology-economics science fiction. The author is clearly really intelligent. The book has many smart ideas and references, many of which I didn't understand.

Despite not feeling like I really got it, I liked the book and the story was engaging. A group of dead humans have colonized New Mars resurrecting themselves in bodies grown from DNA. They coexist with robots of varying degrees of cognition, some very human. Humans have solved many problems of the human condi...more
Scribe
Wow. Finished this book 20 seconds ago and need to say wow before I forget everything I just read.

I had this on my shelf for years, unread. It took me months to read. But it was worth it. This is a *smart* book. But not in a pompous way, not in an academic way (much). In a *story* way. It's ambitious, it's epic, and the scariest thing about it is it comes across as *plausible*.

Avoiding spoilers, the story starts from both the future and the past. Where other books hint at some crucial point tha...more
Michael Hall
An intelligent and philosophical science fiction tale with a genre bending foray into economics and politics (socialism, libertarianism, etc.). The storytelling is artful and vivid yet intellectual enough at times to make you stop and think in distraction. It's chapters alternate between a story of identity set in the future on a planet fairly recently colonised by humans, and a second story that skips through the main character's lives from the 1970s into that future. The future story is quite...more
Tristan
A strong follow up to The Star Fraction, this story follows a character briefly mentioned in the previous book.
Alternating between recollections of the recent past and near future to a time far in the future on the settlement of New Mars, it finds the protagonist suddenly reborn from a digital snapshot of their brain taken immediately after their death in the 21st Century.

Againt the story stands on its own merit whilst exploring political themes. This time Benjamin Tucker's individualist anarchy...more
Peter Dunn
I cannot say I am as keen on this second outing in the Fall revolution series. I do like the background society on New Mars which has great ideas such as the fast Folk, free robots set alongside indentured humans minds, and the ability to hire fairly speedy court services which compete for clients. It’s the characters that I do not really buy into. The quasi eternal battle between Wilde and Reid just does not ring true. Reid in particular slides more and more into a cardboard cut-out corporate v...more
Spencer
Selected this book based on it's transhumanist themes. It certainly had some neat ideas about the question of identity and what a transcendent intelligence might be like and it did some neat things with multiple story arcs. However, I gave this a lower rating because I didn't understand most of what was going on. I gave a pass to a lot of the cold-war era politics and social order stuff because I'm generally ignorant of that, but I also didn't understand what was happening a lot of the time in t...more
Jim McGowan
Pretty good, but not MacLeod's best, in my opinion. This book takes the form of chapters alternating between an interesting story set in the future on a planet fairly recently colonised by humans, and a second story that skips through the main character's lives from the 1970s into that future. The future story is quite interesting, but the other story feels like it only exists to tie this story into the same universe as The Star Faction, MacLeod's preceeding novel.
Craig
This novel bounces back and forth between near-future Earth and far-future New Mars. The near-future Earth has some really weird and enjoyable bits, where revolutionaries remake large chunks of Earth (especially Britain) in bizarre ways (I gather his "Star Fraction" covers this in more depth), as does the far-future quasi-Mars, and the (well-done) bits in between. But I had serious trouble accepting the characters and their relationship--just not really believable.
James
... there's a longer story here about how reading this series meshes perfectly with both my memories of living in Glasgow for one semester in the 90s and with where the rest of my college experience fits in my brain, but it'll have to wait. Maybe when I next read the last book in the series. Suffice to say that you can take the scene in Glasgow University's Queen Margaret Union bar, move it up 15 years, and plop me right in the middle of it with no real effort at all.
vladimir
The story of a friendship that spans 300 (yes, 300 years--it all makes sense without the need for pixie-dust or some such crutch), during which civilization crumbles (sort of) and a new civilization (sort of) rises on another planet.

All the while, Macloed's ruminations on the nature of revolutions and the (post)human condition keep the reader's feet on the ground while being dazzled by the his imaginative brilliance. My favorite of the Fall Revolution books.
Matt
mediocre scifi with a lot of "anarchist" (sic) free-market fetishism.
Tani
Better than the first book, but still not really for me. Thinking I'll persevere and read the next one, as it's the award-winner, but may not ever read the last book in the series, depending on how the next one goes.
Eric Holm
Aside from the author's zeal for politics and name dropping, the story was quite entertaining. Still, the conflict between arch nemeses was anti-climactic, and the ending was disappointing. If less energy were spent writing down the names of economic and political authors, and more energy spent on tuning up the intrigue it would be a five star book.
Joe
Any and all of the Fall Revolution books are hard to read. That's not to say they aren't awesomely great books, because without fail they are. What I mean is that you will be challenged by Macleod politically. His story structure is very hard to accept at first but in the end is very rewarding.
Mike
A very entertaining and imaginative story. This is the 5th novel by Ken MacLeod that I've read and I really like his writing style. He manages to weave in a lot of "future politics" without making it boring. The science is always good.
Rob
Anarcho-Marxist SF that cares more about the upcoming revolutions due to unfettered capitolism more than SF-nal aspects. Forward the proletariat--in space!
Stas
Writing not as good as Iain Banks, plot not as inventive, but the more explicit trotskyist/anarchist leanings of the author made it a fun speculative read.
Scott
It's a libertarian wet dream. Which isn't to insult. Dreams are nice. Except when they involve Hitler trying to steal your private parts. This book doesn't.
Trevor
This wonderful book of far-scoping vision was incredible. This is science-fiction as it is supposed to be written.
Eric NYOB
Airplane book. I liked it ok and it was an interesting read but there was not much deep there in the end.
Aaron Anderson
This was interesting at times, and annoying at others. Worth reading if you liked the first.
Lorin Rivers
The Stone Canal: A Novel (Fall Revolution) by Ken MacLeod (2001)
Craig J.
The Stone Canal: A Novel (Fall Revolution) by Ken MacLeod (2001)
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Ken MacLeod is an award-winning Scottish science fiction writer.

His novels have won the Prometheus Award and the BSFA award, and been nominated for the Hugo and Nebula Awards. He lives near Edinburgh, Scotland.

MacLeod graduated from Glasgow University with a degree in zoology and has worked as a computer programmer and written a masters thesis on biomechanics.

His novels often explore socialist, c...more
More about Ken MacLeod...
Cosmonaut Keep (Engines Of Light, #1) The Star Fraction (The Fall Revolution, #1) Newton's Wake: A Space Opera The Cassini Division (The Fall Revolution, #3) Learning the World: A Scientific Romance

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