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The Cosmological Origins of Myth and Symbol: From the Dogon and Ancient Egypt to India, Tibet, and China

3.58 of 5 stars 3.58  ·  rating details  ·  12 ratings  ·  4 reviews
Great thinkers and researchers such as Carl Jung have acknowledged the many broad similarities that exist between the myths and symbols of ancient cultures. One largely unexplored explanation for these similarities lies in the possibility that these systems of myth all descended from one common cosmological plan. Outlining the most significant aspects of cosmology found am ...more
ebook, 208 pages
Published November 24th 2010 by Inner Traditions International (first published September 24th 2010)
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Billy
I enjoyed this book because it broke down and explained a lot of questions I had about the cosmology of the Dogon peoples. I definitely will not say this book is definitive, but it opens up the space to allow one to question their own cosmological structure as well as patterns and symbols. I would recommend this to people interested in ancient astronaut or panspermia.
Jim
Like all attempts to read something into myths and symbols, this book says more about how Laird Scranton makes connections between things. It was well researched and not entirely unconvincing. Hamlet's Mill was better.
Dianna
Fascinating information while the dry writing style does sap some of the joy out of it, but it's well worth the read :-)
Joslyn Dmello


Stay with it...well worth it.
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431499
He is an independent software designer who became interested in Dogon mythology and symbolism in the early 1990s. He has studied ancient myth, language, and cosmology since 1997 and has been a lecturer at Colgate University. He also appears in John Anthony West’s Magical Egypt DVD series.
More about Laird Scranton...
The Science of the Dogon: Decoding the African Mystery Tradition Sacred Symbols of the Dogon: The Key to Advanced Science in the Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphs The Velikovsky Heresies: Worlds in Collision and Ancient Catastrophes Revisited China?s Cosmological Prehistory: The Sophisticated Science Encoded in Civilization?s Earliest Symbols Point of Origin: Gobekli Tepe and the Spiritual Matrix for the World’s Cosmologies

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