Dubliners
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Dubliners

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3.85 of 5 stars 3.85  ·  rating details  ·  58,220 ratings  ·  2,554 reviews
This work of art reflects life in Ireland at the turn of the last century, and by rejecting euphemism, reveals to the Irish their unromantic reality. Each of the 15 stories offers glimpses into the lives of ordinary Dubliners, and collectively they paint a portrait of a nation.
Paperback, 279 pages
Published March 15th 2001 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published 1914)
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Kalliope


(*)


This is a collection of short stories. Or are they one single long story? “A Portrait of the City as an Old and Stultifying Enclave.”?

This story fashions a kaleidoscopic vision of Dublin in the early 1900s. This is a city enclosed in a gray cylinder that a hand turns periodically and new scenes are conjured up for the contemplation of a single (male) eye. The same components reappear, falling in different places playing different relationships with each other; some others disappear forever o...more
Rakhi Dalal
Oct 30, 2013 Rakhi Dalal rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Joyce fans
Shelves: joyce, short-stories
Why do we wish to live this life; life, which at times seem to accompany the vague impressions we have long since been comfortable to carry along; the ideas, the choices, which have become a second nature to us. How many times do we stop and think about them? Particularly, as readers, as the ones who have been challenged, and hence in a way made aware by written word; how many times do we stop and think - life cannot always be a search, it cannot always be a constant exploration into unknown, a...more
Rajat Ubhaykar
"For myself, I always write about Dublin, because if I can get to the heart of Dublin I can get to the heart of all the cities of the world. In the particular is contained the universal."
-James Joyce

Dubliners is fantastic literary inspiration, it forced me to take better notice of my surroundings, of my own city, which has an untapped endless source of heartbreak, joy, turmoil and everything else to do with the human predicament. It also almost forced me to park myself anywhere and write somethi...more
Agnieszka

Was no doubt about it: if you wanted to succeed you had to go away. You could do nothing in Dublin .

The stories that make up Dubliners open with death and death ends it as well . And somewhere in between there is a life . The first truancy , the first timid amorous sighs and all shades of greyness , whole stretches of the usual humdrum reality . People caught up in the daily routine , whom life was withheld .

The workers , petty crooks and freeloaders , seamstresses , scullery maids , servan...more
Robin Tell
I suppose I've always intended to read Joyce; it's terribly daunting but seems inevitable, too, that I must follow the man all the way through to Finnegans Wake. I have a copy. Untouched. Another remnant of the days when I thought I was on Earth to prove some kind of a point.

But I'm still awfully curious, and this year I finally dipped a toe in. Dubliners came first and seemed easiest to start with, and I'd read a story or two of it already. And indeed it is pretty conventional, even self-consci...more
Selby
From my review of The Dead, the final story in Dubliners:


I thought I was done with James Joyce. I really did.

I've read Ulysses. Twice. I've also read multiple study-guides; slogged through countless websites of analyses. I'm still resentful at Ulysses. Right when you are about to give up, with finality, you come across one of those lines. Those Joyce nuggets. Those snippets of such purity you wonder if he is but a vessel through with a literary higher power is speaking. Then the magic wears off...more
Kim

There's nothing I can say about this collection of fifteen short stories (or rather, fourteen short stories and one novella) which hasn’t been said thousands of times before. However, I can say that it's been a revelation to discover that Joyce's early work is so accessible. I found these stories - all of which provide glimpses of Dubliners at a particular moment of insight and self-realisation in their lives - utterly fascinating. They contain memorable characters, beautiful language and a stro...more
John
Dec 10, 2008 John rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: readers who want to know the world in its noisy entirety
Recommended to John by: a teacher I guess
Brilliant and encyclopedic as James Joyce was -- the artist who, more than any other, hauled the ancient storytellers' calling to distill an entire culture into the 20th Century -- his work in prose began with this subdued, sequenced exercise in urban heartache, and it's the book I choose to celebrate for Goodreads. Yes, ULYSSES had its way with me, too, a walloping inspiration, there's no denying. But DUBLINERS provides the ur-version for what's become a fiction staple, the community portrait i...more
Jacob
May 2009 (3 stars)

I took a film class in college a few years ago, and the final involved a reading of "The Dead" from Dubliners, followed by the film and some sort of comparative essay. I opted for the alternative final, in which I had to adapt a scene from a book--any book--into a short screenplay. It was probably more challenging and time-consuming, true, but at least I didn't have to read Joyce. But now I'm curious to find out precisely what it was I thought I should avoid. Who's afraid of th...more
Kareena
IMAGINATION,ILLUSION,VISION AND CONSCIOUSNESS.

Is there ever an end to the amount of regrets,heartbreak and human predicament?Can anyone ever lead a life where they have a proper harmony
between their mind and the heart?Can anyone ever listen to the yearnings of their heart clearly?

Joyce has taken a straightforward topic:his people - average.One thing which was really appreciable is that he didn't sought after extraordinary people who had probably extraordinary talents or lives.In these quite med...more
Emma
I never finished reading this book of short stories by James Joyce, but reading the first story changed my life. I read part of this book during the summer before or after my Senior year of high school. I was amazed by the way Joyce constructed his sentences and described ordinary things. The line "as the evening invaded the avenue" has always struck me as beautiful and I now actively seek authors who don't describe things in ordinary terms. While I had always been an active reader prior to this...more
Jessica
My displeasure with Dubliners, and my general distaste for James Joyce, is a long-standing fact. I won't waste space here by trash-talking "The Dead" like I usually do. The only story I really like in this collection is "Eveline."

I know, I'm the worst English major ever.
Simona Bartolotta
I pensieri mi scappavano via. Gli impegni seri della vita, che ora parevano separarmi dai miei desideri, mi sembravano un gioco infantile, antipatico e noioso. (dal racconto 'Arabia')

Dopo aver letto i primi racconti ero abbastanza perplessa. Il fatto è che c'era qualcosa, in questo libro, che non mi convinceva affatto; mi sembrava che ogni racconto non finisse mai, ma una volta letta l'ultima parola di ognuno si raccartocciassero su se stessi e le vite dei personaggi riprendessero a scorrere dac...more
Lou
The wonderful stories within the Dubliners have stood the test of time and provided a wonderful eye-opening glimpse a retrospective look through the keyhole of lives in Dublin. The introduction to this new edition adequately describes ‘Dubliners’ by the writer Colm Toibin.

“That idea of shabby, solitary and secretive lives-men moving alone, their lives half fueled by alcohol, men trapped in their work, living in a mean boarding house, or in bare rooms, men with some education but scant hope- mak...more
Kelly
Jun 04, 2007 Kelly rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Joyce fans, people who want to read the perfect short story: "The Dead"
This collection of short stories set in Dublin was written by an immature, youthful Joyce. He is not yet the man who wrote Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake. He's young, and he's seeding the ground with what will make him famous. I actually adore these kinds of novels. The young work of a great master. Showing him in his process, and watching the maturity grow as you read over his work. I think perhaps it reminds me that these men were not luminous beings who were gifted naturally to pour out the page...more
Elham
This is my first experience of Joyce and I really liked it. I read it in Persian and unfortunately the translation wasn't so good, but even with that translation it was so clear to me what a treasure it was.

Joyce knows everything; every small step, every small gesture. He lives in the present moment. He sees the people: how they feel, how they think, how they speak. A genius psychologist; a genius writer!

Reading this collection of short stories shows me every little emotional experience in life...more
Stela
Joyce, you have to take him in small doses, carefully tasted and swallowed. Do not expect to like his universe, do not expect to lose yourself in some kind of trama bliss. You must never choose to be a first-level reader of his books (to use Umberto Eco‘s terminology), only a second-level one, that is, one who looks for how and not for what it is told. The epiphanies of his characters are all about dullness and hopelessness, about bleakly understanding their lives and resigning to their fate.
Th...more
Erelin
This Was my first introduction to famous James Joyce. I decided I should start with some of his shorter works before tackling Ulysses. I should start by saying that I am definitely in awe of Joyce's genius, his amazing, almost supernatural talent, and that I feel that there is so much an aspiring writer can learn from him. I definitely agree that he is amongst the greatest writers who have ever lived. So I bow down before him and give him all the glory he deserves. However, having said that, I f...more
Samantha
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Ted
These aren't the most exciting short stories ever written. They were written by Joyce, though, so that sets them on a level of Literature that most writers can only dream of. It also means that they are worthy of study, and that the time spent studying them will be well spent.

Terence Brown's Introduction shows that he has studied these stories for a long time, and his Notes make it apparent that there is not a word, a slang term, a Dublin location, nor a historical reference in the stories that...more
Trevor
The worst of it is that I know I’ve read this before. Some of the stories I would have read more than once before too. So, why is it that so few of them have stayed with me?

There are other stories I've read in my life that I could nearly recite to you and bits of poetry I quite literally could recite – in fact, one of my less amusing party tricks is to do just that with endless tracts of The Waste Land. One of the less attractive costs of over-indulging in alcohol…

I think my main problem with t...more
Justin Evans
In a traitorous reversal of my usual approach, I give this edition of Dubliners five stars, and the stories themselves two. Jeri Johnson has produced more or less an academic edition at an outrageously cheap price; her introduction is excellent--providing background to the writing and publishing of the work, and solid readings of a few stories; her notes are *extremely* extensive (to the point that she annotates words I'm pretty sure I knew in middle school). So, excellent job there.

On the othe...more
Dan Porter
Much better than I expected, considering my only other experience with Joyce is Ulysses . "The Dead" is particularly good.
Eleanor
For some reason, these stories left me cold. No doubt this is my lack rather than the author's. I couldn't bring myself to care about the people in the stories, and I didn't warm to Joyce's style of starting and stopping his stories apparently aimlessly. I have read that in each story there is supposed to be a moment of epiphany for the central character. Really? I seem to have missed them: for example, where is the epiphany for the central character in "Counterparts" who finishes up going home...more
Koen Crolla
Joyce is a tedious git. I already don't care much for slice-of-life human-condition type fiction, but the fact that it's Joyce makes it just that tiny bit worse. At least the stories are short (though The Dead is pushing it) and there aren't too many of them.
Dubliners isn't as bad as the Byzantine pretention of Ulysses or the self-indulgent waste of paper that is Finnegans Wake, but other than the odd St.-Patrick's-Day faux-Irish American who wants to pretend these stories are about His People,...more
Venkat Narayanan
Dublin: Hello! James.

James: Hey, You are here.

Dublin: Always been.

James: Oh yeah, well listen I want a theme for my new project. I am trying to do like a multitude of lives packed into one singular piece. Like a symphonic orchestra. Only that I am trying to do it in words.

Dublin: Like a pastiche novel.

James: Not exactly. But I wouldn't mind if its a novel.

Dublin: hmmm! Lemme think!

James: ok

Dublin: (Seriously) Ok, Why don't write about me?

James: YOU! Whats so interesting about you?

Dublin: Think...more
Oscar
Entrar a estas alturas a valorar la obra de James Joyce me parece una temeridad. Sus relatos están magníficamente escritos, que duda cabe. Así que daré mi opinión personal, si ésta sirve de algo. Los cuentos de ‘Dublineses’, salvo en algunos, me han parecido en general tediosos, costándome en ocasiones mantener la atención en lo que me estaba contando. Las historias reflejan el Dublín de la época, quedando en meras postales costumbristas que no llegan a interesarme realmente. Joyce escribe desde...more
Tancredi
"Moriva dal desiderio di salire in cielo attraverso il tetto e di volare verso un altro paese dove non avrebbe più sentito parlare dei suoi guai, eppure una forza lo spingeva dabbasso scalino per scalino."

Liquidare Gente di Dublino come la cronaca di una città immobile, morta dentro, incapace di scuotersi, sarebbe estremamente riduttivo. Se è vero che questi quindici racconti (il primo dei quali scritto da Joyce a poco più di vent'anni) sono frutto delle esperienze di vita dell'autore in una cit...more
David
Dubliners is so short, yet so vast. I didn't love every story equally, but I plan to at least write here my thoughts on every one of the stories, but I plan to do so over time, and some maybe I will have to re-read. I read this collection as part of my Ulysses book-club preparation, and it definitely got me geared up to devour more of James Joyce. His prose and insights are beautiful, even though his Dublin is sort of beautifully ugly and malignantly beloved. After my first reading, the story wh...more
Radwa
أول مرأة أقرأ له و المصادفة أن هذه مجموعته القصصية الأولى و هى تحكى عن حال الناس فى دبلن
فى فترة ما بين الاحتلال و الاستقلال ..
و أسامى القصص (الشقيقات - لقاء - السوق العربية - ايفلين - بعد السباق - سحابة صيف - صورة طبق الأصل
العانس - الانتخابات - الأم - التوبة - و الموتى) والموتى طويلة جدا بالنسبة لقصة قصيرة

معظم القصص ليست لها نهاية مغلقة أو معينة .. مجرد نهاية مفتوحة
و ده ضايقنى فى بعض القصص لنى فى النهاية لم أفهم مغزى القصة و فى بعضها كان مناسب جدا!
و فى مواضيع متكررة فى معظم القصص: مثل المشاكل ب...more
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  • James Joyce
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  • The Collected Stories
  • Collected Fictions
  • The New Bloomsday Book: A Guide Through Ulysses
  • Short Stories
  • James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study
  • Forty Stories (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics)
  • Ulysses Annotated
  • Billy Budd and Other Stories
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Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the Goodreads database with this name. See this thread for more information.

James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish novelist, noted for his experimental use of language in such works as Ulysses (1922) and Finnegans Wake (1939). Joyce's technical innovations in the art of the novel include an extensive use of interior monologue; he used a complex network of s...more
More about James Joyce...
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Ulysses The Dead Finnegans Wake A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man/Dubliners

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“A few light taps upon the pane made him turn to the window. It had begun to snow again. He watched sleepily the flakes, silver and dark, falling obliquely against the lamplight. The time had come for him to set out on his journey westward. Yes, the newspapers were right: snow was general all over Ireland. It was falling on every part of the dark central plain, on the treeless hills, falling softly upon the Bog of Allen and, farther westward, softly falling into the dark mutinous Shannon waves. It was falling, too, upon every part of the lonely churchyard on the hill where Michael Furey lay buried. It lay thickly drifted on the crooked crosses and headstones, on the spears of the little gate, on the barren thorns. His soul swooned slowly as he heard the snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead.” 244 likes
“and yet her name was like a summons to all my foolish blood.” 187 likes
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