Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout
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Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout

3.88 of 5 stars 3.88  ·  rating details  ·  1,093 ratings  ·  230 reviews

Fire Season both evokes and honors the great hermit celebrants of nature, from Dillard to Kerouac to Thoreau—and I loved it.”
—J.R. Moehringer, author of The Tender Bar

“[Connors’s] adventures in radical solitude make for profoundly absorbing, restorative reading.”
—Walter Kirn, author of Up in the Air

Phillip Connors is a major new voice in American nonfiction, and his remar

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Kindle Edition, 261 pages
Published (first published March 10th 2011)
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Ms Bubbles SockieP
Five stars because I enjoyed reading the book, but for everything else, content, prose, direction, it's closer to a three-star. The book is absolutely ideal to listen to as an audio book because nothing much happens and so if you drift away, you won't miss anything. It is a bit like a day dream, you come back to reality with a pleasant, peaceful feeling and don't even give a thought to what was going on meantime.

I probably wouldn't be so hard on this book in the review if I hadn't just finished...more
Will Byrnes
Philip Connors tried his hand at a number of jobs and did pretty well. But his true love was the outdoors, particularly the remote outdoors. So, when an opportunity presented itself for him to spend half a year in a fire tower in remotest New Mexico, he dropped his reportorial gig at the Wall Street Journal and headed southwest. He knew a fair bit about the outdoors before beginning, from his Minnesota upbringing, and learned even more on the job. He kept on learning as he re-upped for one more...more
Liz
When I bought this book, I was excited to read it and hoping for insight into solitude and a different way of life. What I got instead was a steaming pile of self-absorption. Connors seems to fancy himself another Kerouac, going off into the wilderness to drink alone, be manly, and have profound experiences—none of which came through in his writing. There was a lot of hero-worship going on in the book, and I get the impression that Connors wants to see himself added to the list of great wilderne...more
Krenner1
Reported tonight on the national news, a 150,000 acre fire in New Mexico's Gila Forest is not yet under control. After reading this book, I wonder who first spotted the fire; who was in the tower. The author spends summers solo in a fire watch tower in the Gila. This book about that solitude, the beauty of the mountain, and his contentment with both is a slow read. You really have to love the mountains and wildlife to love this book. Which I do, and did. Along with his musings, he veers off into...more
Judy
After reading a glowing review of this book, I was both pleased and surprised to find it on my local library's new book shelf. So, Philip Connors worked as an editor for the Wall Street Journal until he couldn't stand it anymore and September 11th happened. Then he moved to New Mexico where for five months out of the year he has what he considers to be the world's best job. He lives alone in the New Mexico mountains working as a fire spotter for the National Forest Service--which calls the peopl...more
Kerrie
The fire tower lookout (aka "the freaks on the peaks", as they are called by the Forest Service) is a dying breed and Philip Connors gives us a tantalizing glimpse into that isolated existence - which only last 3-4 months, but can feel like a year of misery depending on the hardiness of the person. This is a life that he embraces, considering he has done it for 8 seasons, and his descriptions of the joy of solitude, the contentment of watching and listening to the mountains, experiencing all the...more
Jackie
This is a beautiful book about a rare man with an even rarer summer job--he's one of the last fire spotters in existence. 5 months of the year he leaves civilization behind, drives 40 miles then hikes 5 more (sometimes having to literally crawl through snow on his first trip up in late April) to a lookout tower and a small cabin and millions of acres of trees, desert, and mountains. On a clear day he can see for 200 miles from his posting. Alice, his dog, is generally his only company other than...more
 ~☆ Alice♥♥
I enjoyed this book very much and now hope to find Edward Abbey's Dark Sun which is about his fire watch time. I think anyone who loves to read about nature will enjoy it.
Freida
Phillip Connors has spent the last eight spring and summer months in an isolated part of The Gila National Forest helping the National Forest Service keep an eye on forest fires. This book is part history of the landforms, part history of the cultures that settled the area, part history of the National Forest Service and their own connection with forest fires, and part daily confessional of what it is like to live such a solitary life cut off from almost all human interaction.

Lest you think thi...more
K
In the spring and summer of 2011 the mountains and prairies of the southwest United States burst into flame. Some fires were started by lightning, others were man-made. No matter what started the fires the end result was that large swaths of land became charred wilderness. While fires that started in populated areas were easily spotted the fires in more remote areas were harder to see and therefore to control. The forest service’s first line of defense in these remote areas are the fire lookouts...more
Mary
Perhaps it was a little unfair for me to turn to this book immediately after finishing Edward Abbey's DESERT SOLITAIRE. As in that book, not much really "happens" during the author's tenure as a government-appointed overseer of a stretch of Western wilderness. His love of the place--in this case, the Gila Wilderness of New Mexico--is just as palpable as Abbey's, and he has his moments as a prose stylist, especially while reflecting on the experience of solitude. But I think I expected more to "h...more
Ellen Librarian
I think I would have liked this book even if I hadn't read it in the midst of what has to be one of the worst if not THE worst fire season in NM. It's a beautiful meditation on life, wilderness and so many other things - including the role of lookout work in the lives of many fine writers such as Jack Kerouac and Norman MacLean.

Connors also has a lot to say about fire, of course, and as I read this book downwind of the Las Conchas fire, now the biggest ever recorded in NM, I found his perspecti...more
Grayson D
Dec 31, 2011 Grayson D rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone, especially lovers of nature
Fire Season. There's a lot for me to say about this book.

As an agriculture technology student that plans to go into Forestry. Living in Texas, close to where this book takes place. I guess it simply just struck a, common ground with me. A ground very intimate and close to my heart. As a lover of nature and the wild this book has kickstarted me on a habit for wanting to delve deeper into the literary minds of lookouts and nature loving individuals and stories in general.

This book, while it may s...more
Rebecca Foster
A meditation on nature and solitude fit to rival Sara Maitland’s A Book of Silence, Annie Dillard’s Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, and, I imagine (I hate having to sheepishly admit I still haven’t read such a classic), Thoreau’s Walden.

“That thing some people call boredom, in the correct if elusive dosage, can be a form of inoculation against itself. Once you struggle through that swamp of monotony where time bogs down in excruciating ticks from your wristwatch, it becomes possible to break through to...more
Janis
Philip Connors’ Fire Season, about the author’s experience as a fire lookout in New Mexico’s Gila Wilderness, is a praise-song to the Gila, a memoir, a history of wilderness fire management. Connors’ writing is impeccable, beautiful yet I felt reading it a sense of easy compatibility with the author. He made me laugh and left me, in the end, feeling quite vulnerable and moved by his experiences and the way in which he shared them. I’m putting him up there with Dillard, Maclean, Abbey and other o...more
Andie
This slim book is part memoir, part historical account of the job of "fire lookout", and part analysis of the blunders of human efforts at controlling nature, particularly during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Personally, my favorite parts of the book by far were those details Connors' personal experience as a look out. The lookout's season is April through August, and the book is divided up into five sections, each surrounding a month and based off journals he wrote about his activitie...more
Zuberino
A two-week wait at my local London library culminated in an email notifying me that Fire Season had finally arrived, there for my taking. It was entirely worth the wait. Every page has passages of lyric prose, Connors' voice more meditative than that of one of his inspirations, Edward Abbey, whose Desert Solitaire this book comes close to matching in its descriptions of the beauty of the West.

In painting an entire season in the Gila, Connors takes us on a tour through time and space - fires in...more
Susan
Mar 23, 2011 Susan rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone interested in ecology, lovers of solitude
Five miles from the nearest road, sitting on top of what is essentially a lightning rod with a roof – that's not something most of us could tolerate, much less crave. Something Mr. Connors chose to do for several summers in his job as a fire lookout. (Something that I, being a bit of a loner, would probably like. Except for the lightning. And the snakes. And the dead mice stuck to the floor when the cabin is first opened for the season.)

Despite all the vitriol we've directed at it, despite all t...more
Richard
If you've ever wondered what it's like or been interested in spending time in a fire tower you owe it to yourself to read Phil Connors book. Heavily endorsed with blurbs by such renowned writers as Barry Lopez and Annie Proulx and rightfully so. Connors book reads much like Ed Abbeys extraordinarily beautiful epic “Desert Solitaire” with strains of Abbeys “favorite” book “Black Sun” for good measure.
Thrown in with the solitude that is life in a fire tower Connors provides the context for what ha...more
Ryandake
i can't help but think of this book in comparison to Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, which i also recently read (i wrote a review of it, then goodreads ate it before it posted. grrrr). so i shall compare, which isn't quite cricket, but too bad.

Connors' book is a memoir of sorts of his time spent as a wilderness fire lookout; Strayed's book is a memoir of hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. they have a lot of similarities--wilderness, solitude, self-reliance, joy in relatively un...more
Richard H.
A Man and His Dog in Fire Country

"Fire Season: Field Notes From a Wilderness Lookout"
by Philip Connors is one of those relaxing airplane ride books or winter fireside reads that really lets you understand how being on a fire watchtower, miles from anyone else could be both exciting and soul refreshing. Solitude is something that many of us don’t get enough of anymore. At the same time, when the storms come in and Zeus starts throwing his bolts of fire and Thor hammers you from all sides, the Go...more
Martin Cerjan
This book never really grabbed me, but it grew on me. I thought the end of the book was the best--and some very fine writing. For my money, the best book about fire is still Young Men and Fire--which I would recommend in a heartbeat to anyone with an interest. I don't mean to be too rough on Connors though. He seems like a nice enough guy and a solid writer. Maybe I'm just a little fatigued by the memoir form. I maybe would have structured the book a bit differently, but that's what happens with...more
Kiri
Dec 26, 2011 Kiri rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: People interested in ecology, the environment, CRM, Forestry, and history buffs.
This was an excellent read. The author is bright, lively, and engaging in his style. I admit to being fond of the general topic having studied fire use and ecology in relation to my degrees. He cites several well known authors in the genre and talks about where he is and what might happen. In case you are squeamish he does not get graphic with the events of the past, nor of the present - he does describe them sufficiently to give a good overview and leave the reader to locate more books or infor...more
Emma
I read this book because of my love for nature and hiking, and also solitary life. I found all this in the book, but much more! I learned a lot about fire management, I have to say I did not know that we were actually letting some fires burn out there, because it’s actually very good for the trees regrowth, just as nature took care by itself for centuries of fires, and tree management.

To read my whole review, please go to:
http://wordsandpeace.wordpress.com/20...

Thanks
Emma @ Words And Peace
Jan
A brilliantly evocative meditation on nature and our place in it. Philip Connors left a job with the Wall Street Journal to become a fire spotter in the New Mexico Gila Wilderness. The solitary nature of the job becomes a catalyst for soul searching, much as it had done for Aldo Leopold and other writers, who took similar jobs in hopes of connecting with nature and finding focus for their lives. The writing is lyrical and wonderful. Highly recommended.
Sally
Good book to read after all the fires this summer in my area. Learned a lot about our messed-up policy for fire prevention in national forests. Fire is a natural phenomenon in forests and served an ecological function. It's become a monster because it now threatens our developments and settlements. We've got to have a fire policy that balances the need for natural areas to burn periodically and the protection of private property.
Chris
Loved this book! Glad I bought it. Romanticism meets pragmatism. Should become another classic about the West. Besides being an introspective book it's also a primer on the natural world and the American West. We meet Jack Kerouac, Norman Maclean, Aldo Leopold, and the ghosts of the Apache and Buffalo Soldiers. Great prose, vivid descriptions, and lines/aphorisms that will linger with me. Now I have to visit Silver City, NM.
Heather Roberts
i am so sooooo excited to read this. this mister is on radio west right now and gor-gee-ous. he's reading at sam weller's saturday and i just have to hear him. what he's reading is nifty. my land of enchantment {NM} based. apparently he writes for harper's and the paris review. i don't know anything else about him. these are enough, for now, to pique me. fun, fun.
Mark
Connors writes an entertaining and enlightening account of his time on Apache Peak, weaving in his personal story, the history of fire suppression in the United States, the literary importance of fire lookouts (Snyder, Kerouac, Whalen, Abbey), and thoughts on wilderness. The book feels like a narrative of his time as a lookout, but he also engages with the great thinkers that have written before. His consideration of Leopold in particular struck me as honest, thoughtful and productive. But all o...more
Laura
Aug 25, 2011 Laura rated it 2 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Bettie
For nearly a decade, Philip Connors has spent half of each year in a 7 foot by 7 foot room at the top of a tower, on top of a mountain, alone in millions of acres of remote American wilderness. His job: to look for wildfires.

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“By being virtually useless in the calculations of the culture at large I become useful, at last, to myself.” 0 likes
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