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The Beautiful One Has Come: Stories

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4.15 of 5 stars 4.15  ·  rating details  ·  13 ratings  ·  6 reviews
This exquisitely written book consists of twelve short stories, each focusing on how a woman handles living in another country or how to live in their own. Most of these stories take place in Japan, where the women have to learn to adjust into a culture that is considerably different then what they are used to or how their ideas differ from society. This book gives the rea ...more
Paperback, 212 pages
Published July 11th 2011 by Wyatt-MacKenzie Publishing

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Gillian Marchenko
After reading the first story in the collection, I started to tweak my daily schedule to secure an earlier bed time. I couldn't wait to score a few blissfully quiet moments to jump into another story in "The Beautiful One Has Come." Suzanne is a gifted writer. Story after story confirmed the universality of real life, braided effortlessly with continents and struggles and humanity.

I lost my breath as I was eerily whisked back to my own daughter's birth while reading "Polishing The Halo," a story
...more
Michele Tater
Book Title: The Beautiful One Has Come
Author: Suzanne Kamata
Publisher: Wyatt-MacKenzie Publishing
ISBN: 978193363143809
Reviewed by Michele Tater for The Couch Tater Review

This exquisitely written book consists of twelve short stories, each focusing on how a woman handles living in another country or how to live in their own. Most of these stories take place in Japan, where the women have to learn to adjust into a culture that is considerably different then what they are used to or how their ideas
...more
Margaret Willey
This book is aptly titled; there is much beauty and expectancy in the collection. I was immediately impressed with Suzanne Kamata's original writing style; a fine mix of evocative writing and clarity in a voice that is definitely influenced by the author's immersion in another culture, yet still somehow very midwestern and forthright. I loved the stories and was moved to tears by several, most notably "You're So Lucky." Now I am excited to read Losing Kei, but also pretty sure that it will break ...more
Tara
Kamata's stories reverberate like a Japanese Noh opera: They portray the "agony of love" in all its forms, acted out by sympathetic characters in various stages of external flight and internal change. The stories are artfully plotted, and tiny details--spots on photos, bean-filled cakes, sewing stitches, insects--take on the heavier weight of symbolism under her observant, empathic eye. Kamata will make you look at the world, and the culture you take for granted, in enhanced and profound ways.
Rhonda
It is a nice collection of japensee glimpses of thier coulture. The stories are short just glances. I enjoyed the one where two students met at art school and 4 years later they are married and have gone to Paris to paint. On the begining of that story her mom gets after her because she wants to finsh her picture before she does some work. Later after dinner the father asks her if they were her pictures and said they needed to send her to art school.
One story about a american living with her jap
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Literary Mama
In “Hawaiian Hips,” the second story out of twelve well-crafted pieces that make up The Beautiful One Has Come by Suzanne Kamata, an American expatriate lives with her Japanese husband in a small island town off the edge of the Inland Sea. After five years, Beth still considers herself an outsider even though Japanese women no longer look into her shopping cart to see what kind of toilet paper she buys. She joins a Hula class and befriends Victor, a gay American instructor from Hawaii.

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Five-time Pushcart Prize nominee Suzanne Kamata is the author of the novels Screaming Divas (Merit Press, 2014), Gadget Girl: The Art of Being Invisible (GemmaMedia, 2013) and Losing Kei (Leapfrog Press, 2008), and editor of three anthologies - The Broken Bridge: Fiction from Expatriates in Literary Japan, Love You to Pieces: Creative Writers on Raising a Child with Special Needs, and Call Me Okaa ...more
More about Suzanne Kamata...
Gadget Girl: The Art of Being Invisible Losing Kei The Screaming Divas Love You to Pieces: Creative Writers on Raising a Child with Special Needs Call Me Okaasan: Adventures in Multicultural Mothering

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