Theories of Flight
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Theories of Flight (Samuil Petrovitch #2)

4.09 of 5 stars 4.09  ·  rating details  ·  736 ratings  ·  72 reviews
Winner of the 2012 Philip K. Dick Award

Theorem: Petrovitch has a lot of secrets.

Proof: Secrets like how to make anti-gravity for one. For another, he's keeping a sentient computer program on a secret server farm - the same program that nearly destroyed the Metrozone a few months back.

Theorem: The city is broken.

Proof: The people of the OutZone want what citizens of the Me...more
ebook, 276 pages
Published May 1st 2011 by Orbit
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(showing 1-30 of 1,149)
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Христо Блажев
Петрович пак трябва да оцелява в ада на Метрозоната: http://knigolandia.info/book-review/t...

Ето го! Петрович е пак тук, неунищожим като хлебарка, вбесен като гръцки бог, упорит като политик на власт. В началото на “Теории за полета” той току-що е постигнал невъзможното – открил е антигравитацията (или нещо много подобно, но кой ли ще му слуша умните приказки?), но на никого не му е до това точно сега. Полуразрушената в “Уравненията на живота” Метрозона е под яростна атака от външните, жена му –...more
Liviu
The second Petrovitch book starts well and for the first 100 pages I thought it will match the debut and maybe even take the series to the next level; then it turns repetitive, predictable and a little boring since there is nothing essentially new introduced despite tantalizing hints
Michael
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
John
The second book in the Samuil Petrovitch/Metrozone trilogy set in post-apocalyptic London, starts about 4 months after the events of the first book, Equations of Life. I really enjoyed this novel, though perhaps not as much as Equations of Life, and I think the reason for that is I felt the pacing was a bit off at first. Midway through the book, however, things have picked up to the frenzied pace I enjoyed in Equations, and the story overall is fantastic. I think this trilogy would benefit from...more
L
Sci-Fi novels typically plunge the reader into another time, another place, or both. Some explain the fictional world more or less pedantically, and then let the story roll. Others just charge ahead, leaving the reader to pick it up along the way. In the best of these, character and story carry it all. This is one of those. By the end, I still didn't really have a handle on much of the back-story. And that just didn't matter, not really. Morden peopled his tale with interesting characters and th...more
Katrina
I read all three of the trilogy back to back and this was just as entrancing as the first one. I will say that by the end of this book Sam has become a bit of a Stu, but not in such an overwhelming way that it killed my joy. I did have the same complaint that I had with the first book which is that you are thrown in this world and not a lot of the back story is explained. For example: America is some crazy right wing theocracy and the author continuously refers to it as "Reconstructionist" and v...more
Sexy
I have read the whole trilogy and I loved every bit of it. Reminds me of Cowboy Bebop a bit in how they feel. The first book felt very anime-like. However, in this second book, the plot thickens, as it should. It's just a fun read. I highly recommend to anyone interested in the cyber-punk genre. You've got your hero, you've got your trusty side kicks, the action, and what have you. It's a very colorful adventure. It's probably not one of the 'greats', but if they made a movie out of this, I'd su...more
Stuart Reid
The Metrozone is being invaded by the Outies, and only Samuel Petrovitch, with a little extra help, is up to task of defending it. Without his new found prowess there's a danger great swathes of the zone will be abandoned, but Petrovitch - looking for his wife - will stop at nothing to defend his adopted city, defy the CIA, and use the one thing that has America running scared to get his own way.

This book is perhaps a little more jumbled than the first but it's a fun romp through the near-future...more
Jacqueline Wagenstein
ПЕТРОВИЧ пак трябва да оцелява в ада на Метрозоната - РЕВЮ НА ХРИСТО БЛАЖЕВ

"Ето го! Петрович е пак тук, неунищожим като хлебарка, вбесен като гръцки бог, упорит като политик на власт. В началото на “Теории за полета” той току-що е постигнал невъзможното – открил е антигравитацията (или нещо много подобно, но кой ли ще му слуша умните приказки?), но на никого не му е до това точно сега. Полуразрушената в “Уравненията на живота” Метрозона е под яростна атака от външните, жена му – някогашната бойн...more
Marcos
Disappointing second entry in the series. To say that it is a mess would be an understatement: the author seems to throw everything at the wall to see what sticks, but in the end not much seems to make sense. On top of that, every time he doesn't know what to do with a character, he is killed. This is meant to be more or less a post-apocalyptic world, but come on. It doesn't help that the main character has turned from wimpy underdog into an all-powerful being, capable of physically overpowering...more
Amber
After reading Equations of Life, I could hardly wait for the second installment of Mr. Morden's trilogy, and it didn't disappoint! I always find myself picturing Mr. Morden's stories as a really good anime series. Petrovitch's interfacing with machines has always been fascinating, but in this book he takes it to the next level - plugged into the network through a brain jack a la Matrix. I got downright jealous reading about the capabilities he had. I've often wanted to have an information-rich o...more
Morgan
The first book is all about escalation of action. Just when you think things couldn't get any crazier they do, and then they get crazier still. It is an exploration in going over the top and does it gracefully. I don't think the pacing of Theories of Flight is as successful, despite being all the things that you want out of an action adventure (engrossing page-turner). The book opens with some set-up, some loose ends from the first novel that you didn't realize were loose. He brings back all the...more
Sarah (Workaday Reads)
Samuil Petrovich is a scientist who has just discovered how to make anti-gravity. He works and lives in Metrozone, which used to be London, England before Armageddon changed the world. Unfortunately, Metrozone is being torn apart. Can Petrovich save his beloved city?

One of my main criticisms of Equations of Life was the difficulty in understanding the world set-up. As I expected, this is not an issue in the second book. Not just because I am familiar with it now, but the outside world plays a ve...more
Lynossa
Sam Petrovitch is back on his second adventure! After saving Metrozone from the AI that invaded Metrozone's system, now he's married to Maddy and dedicate his life to work on his theories and inventing anti-gravity. But just like before, people wont leave him alone. Chain showed up and told him that CIA is after those who were active involved in the bloody Long Night and wanted to get a hold on the AI. Not interesting to give up the AI nor letting CIA do whatever they wanted, Sam must put aside...more
Jo  (Mixed Book Bag)
SPOILER ALERT: Don’t read if you don’t want some spoilers.

When we left Samuil Petrovitch in Equations of Life he had defeated The New Machine Jihad, was in a hospital, his heart had given out, the hospital did not have a new heart and Mattie left to find a new one. Things have changed since then.

As Theories of Flight begins we find Samuil at his desk looking at a spear that was built to Samuil’s equations, is a work of art, but does not perform as expected. He is taking his glasses off and putti...more
Charles Dee Mitchell
When we last saw our hero in Equations of Life he was awaiting a new heart in a London Freezone hostpital, having survived encounters with the Yakuza, the Russian Mafia, the New Machine Jihad, possibly saving the world and solving the solution The Theory of Everything at the same time. Sammuil Petrovitch is both a survivor and a genius. Theories of Flight pits him against old and new enemies, forces him to form new alliances, and once again possibly save the planet. But in the first chapter we l...more
the golden witch.
This review is one for all three books. Just a warning.

I totally did NOT expect to get sucked into this series as much as I did, and the fact that it’s only a trilogy makes me profoundly sad. This is an awesome, awful alternate present/future that Morden has created, and I’m sad to see it go. But let’s take a look at what makes it so great, shall we?

This world is split off from ours at 2000, says Morden in an interview in the back of the first book. However, he doesn’t say how far in the future...more
Eleanor
A little slow going at first, then speeds up really quickly. Petrovitch is an odd mix of a dreamer and a cynical pragmatist in some ways. I wonder if Morden considered that a Russian characteristic. In this book, Petrovitch is more assured, as a hero, and one with a working blood circulation organ.

I think Morden was learning to handle women better in this book too. Almost all of the female cast are still in love with Petrovitch (exceptions: kickass ally Valentina, buddy-colleague Pif who spends...more
Lushr
Just as much chaos, female heroics and pain as the last one, but surprisingly different in that Maddy is unavailable for part of the story and the direction the metro zone takes is nothing like what I'd have imagined at page one. It is interesting that Simon seems to enjoy shredding his protagonist into littler grosser pieces with each story - presumably so he can get upgrades for the next novel? The women truly kick ass in this story, and they're not all besotted with him which is nice.
Gatzby
Pretty good follow-up to the orignal, but didn't really expand the world around them much. I think I may have grown accustomed to more world-building in a trilogy.

This book definitely played with the ideas of humanity, technology, and morality -- namely where they meet, what they mean, and how we relate to them. In other words, what computers do to us, and can they be better humans than us? Probably.

There's a lot of "this character is good guy anti-hero with godlike powers" going on. I'm hoping...more
Аделина 'Змей' Генова
http://knigozavar.com/teorii-za-poleta/

Книгата е четиво тип „дъвка“ – бясно преследване, малко пукотевица, тук-там някой термин и нови технологии. За сметка на това, Сам Петрович и неговата руска суровост неминуемо ще ви позабавляват. И няма как да не се усмихнеш на някой, който си позволява да изтрие данните на Уолстрийт, причинявайки загуби за милиарди.

http://knigozavar.com/teorii-za-poleta/
Stephane
Interesting follow up to Equation of Life (part one of the Samuil Petrovitch trilogy) although not as strong. Most of the focus of this volume is on Sam's quest to not only deal with an invasion of the Outies (with a generous help of the US government) but also trying to find his wife and save various people who he comes across. Stalingrad is mentioned a few times by Sam, with the writer trying to draw a parallel between the events in the book and the tragedy that took place in WW2. I'm not real...more
Radi Radev
Самуил Петрович притежава цялата луда гениалност на д-р Емет Браун от "Завръщане в бъдещето" и част от бойните умения на Ричард Марчинко от "Свирепия". Петрович прави сериозно изобретение в областта на антигравитацията и разбира се го показват по телевизията. Поради тази причина много хора вече го познават и го считат за "ругаещият физик от новините". Самуил е нетипичен герой и бих желал да ви представя част от думите, с които авторът умело разкрива неговия характер:

http://radiradev.blogspot.com...more
Sadie Pearson
Once again Morden did a terrific job with keep this book completely enthralling from beginning to end. It was even more action packed than the first book. It's a need to read book.
Иван
Втората част е просто още от същото, само че повторено и поднесено по-зле, с много повече WTF моменти и никаква интрига. Също така това дето спаси първата част - хуморът, цинизма и хитростта на Петрович, тук липсват до голяма степен. Не започвайте поредицата, освен ако не сте фенове на безмисления екшън, нелогичния сюжет и "учен, със свръх технологични и модерни очила, който знае повече бойни изкуства от Джеки Чан". А също така и отнова преекспонираната идея за супер умният компютър с ИИ, който...more
Barrington
The second in the series was even better than the first. Morden expands his world in a fascinating way, and his knack for character development really shows in this book. The scenery and the interactions between old and new characters is incredibly complicated. He even takes a trope which could be overdone - the hero - and keeps him a believable and likeable character. Morden is able to provide enough back story in this novel to answer many questions from Equations of Life (also highly recommend...more
Struggling Writer
I really enjoyed the first book in the Petrovitch series. Action packed and entertaining with some great, believable charaters that i really cared about. Twists and tuns kept me hooked until the end.

However, the second and third books, while still good, were less enjoyable. I felt that the characters became more wooden and i didn't really care about their story anymore. Samuel's actions became too rediculous for me to believe at many points (without spoiling anything).

Overall, a fun triliogy, bu...more
Paul Brown
Ok book. Not quite as good as the first.
I did like it however, and I'll read the next one soon.
Jolie
I must know what happens next!
Tim
Deus ex machina.

That is the soul of this book, and the series as a whole. It's also, unfortunately, how the plots are resolved. Without regard to his own personal safety, the main character drives himself deeper and deeper into deadly situations, only to be rescued by what is literally a god in a machine. Even after he gets his body completely destroyed (again) and even gets his eyes cut up, his machine god makes him more powerful than ever before. No antagonist too strong for this character!
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Dr. Simon Morden, B.Sc. (Hons., Sheffield) Ph.D (Newcastle) is a bona fide rocket scientist, having degrees in geology and planetary geophysics. Unfortunately, that sort of thing doesn’t exactly prepare a person for the big wide world of work: he’s been a school caretaker, admin assistant, and PA to a financial advisor. He’s now employed as a part-time teaching assistant at a Gateshead primary sch...more
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