The Raven and the Sun: Poems and Stories
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Raven and the Sun: Poems and Stories

by
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00  ·  rating details  ·  0 ratings  ·  0 reviews
Boria Sax, steeped in animal studies in myth and literature, is not only a teacher and scholar, but also one of our finest lyric poets. This collection of poems and tales, centered around the mysterious world of crows and ravens that exists around us almost unnoticed, demonstrates the universality of the narratives in which animal wisdom plays, as he retells Eastern Europe...more
Paperback, 82 pages
Published July 1st 2010 by The Poet's Press

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Community Reviews

(showing 1-3 of 3)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Fox
Fox marked it as to-read
Jan 01, 2014
Mysterium
Mysterium marked it as to-read
Mar 18, 2012
Boria Sax
Feb 17, 2012 Boria Sax added it  ·  (Review from the author)
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
24834
Our stories begin long before we are born, and contain more than we can ever know. I have told the story of my early years in the forthcoming book Stealing Fire: A Boyhood in the Shadow of Atomic Espionage. But when I look back, I find myself asking, "Was that really me?"

I first became interested in the literature of animals around the end of the 1980's, not terribly long after I had obtained my P...more
More about Boria Sax...
Crow City of Ravens: The Extraordinary History of London, its Tower and Its Famous Ravens Animals in the Third Reich The Mythical Zoo: An Encyclopedia Of Animals In World Myth, Legend, And Literature Imaginary Animals: The Monstrous, the Wondrous and the Human

Share This Book

“When an animal dies, another of the same species may cling to the body, eat the body, or look bored. Bees expel dead bodies from the hive or, if that is impossible, embalm them in honey. Elephants "say" a ritualistic good-bye, and touch their dead before slowly walking away. Corvids often accept the death of a companion without much fuss, but they at times have “funerals,” where scores of birds lament over the corpse of a deceased crow.

But it is a bit odd that people should investigate whether animals “comprehend death,” as if human beings understood what it means to die. Is death a prelude to reincarnation? A portal to Heaven or Hell? Complete extinction? Union with all life? Or something else? All of these views can at times be comforting, yet people usually fear death, quite regardless of what they claim to believe.

In the natural world, killing seems a casual affair. Human beings, of course, kill on a massive scale, but most of us can only kill, if at all, by softening the impact of the deed through rituals such as drink or prayer. The strike of a spider, a heron, or a cat is swift and, seemingly, without inhibition or remorse. They pounce with a confidence that could indicate ignorance, indifference, or else profound knowledge. Could this be, perhaps, because animals cannot conceive of killing, since they are not aware of death? Could it be because they understand death well, far better than do human beings?

If animals envision the world not in terms of abstract concepts but sensuous images, the soul might appear as a unique scent, a rhythmic motion, or a tone of voice. Death would be the absence of these, though without that absolute finality that we find so severe. Perhaps the heron that snaps a fish thinks his meal lives on, as he one day will, in the form of currents in the pond.”
6 likes
More quotes…