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Church in the Present Tense: A Candid Look at What's Emerging

3.78  ·  Rating Details ·  49 Ratings  ·  6 Reviews
Four influential authors discuss important cultural, theological, philosophical, and biblical underpinnings and implications of the emerging church movement.
ebook, 176 pages
Published February 1st 2011 by Brazos Press
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Bill
Really looking forward to this read!! (OK...I'm supposed to say this...my professor is one of the authors)

Alright...after now reading some of this book, I can honestly say that this is good stuff! I have especially enjoyed Clark's thoughts on consumerism as a religion in competition with Christianity (chapter 3).

His quote, "...at the end of the day we end up 'consuming' mission rather than doing the dirty work of bringing about a concrete church and mission" is a call to action, not mere theolo
...more
Ryan
Aug 08, 2012 Ryan rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
In Church in Present Tense the editor brings together four authors (three and himself) of the Emerging Church movement to discuss four topics: philosophy, theology, worship, and scripture. Each author writes two chapters. Views of each chapter differ (particularly in philosophy), but it is not a response and critique, but rather, in typical emergent fashion, a coexistence of difference. The book had high and low points throughout the book. Corcoran offers a decent overview of "chastened realism. ...more
Ben Zajdel
This collection of essays on the Emerging Church is a fascinating look at the philosophical underpinnings of a controversial and popular movement.

Some of the topics covered:

Kevin Corcoran discusses emergents and philosophical realism, and what side of the fence they fall on. Peter Rollins has a couple of essays, and shares some interesting thoughts on the conflicting nature of accepting an identity in Christ while still retaining an identity that makes up a person. Jason Clark talks about cons
...more
Curtis
Jul 28, 2015 Curtis rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-again
This is a fantastic series of essays and introduced me to great thinkers like Jason Clark and Kevin Corcoran. At a time when my own 'emerging church' (as it was labelled early on) community has closed its doors, these essays have helped clearly frame some of the difficulties and pitfalls of similar communities. Corcoran's essay on philosophical realism was helpful in framing an appropriate response to stronger antirealism tendencies I've come across in various conversations. Clark's on consumer ...more
Dwayne Shugert
Mar 01, 2013 Dwayne Shugert rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Brilliant! Church in the Present Tense, gives us a deeper understanding of the emerging church in both theological and philosophical terms. Having these four scholars (Scot McKnight,Peter Rollins, Kevin Corcoran and Jason Clark) write "side by side" was a great mix of what is emerging in faith, church, Christianity. At times it conversation was bogged down in philosophical jargon but if you read and think deep and stay the course it is well worth it.
Idiosyncratic
Interesting, although I find Peter Rollins, way, way, WAY too esoteric. I can't help thinking the IKON Community must be full of PhDs in philosophy.
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Scot McKnight is a recognized authority on the New Testament, early Christianity, and the historical Jesus. McKnight, author or editor of forty books, is the Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL. Dr. McKnight has given interviews on radios across the nation, has appeared on television, and is regularly speaks at local churches, conferences, colleges, and seminaries in the ...more
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