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True to Our Feelings: What Our Emotions Are Really Telling Us

4.14  ·  Rating Details ·  57 Ratings  ·  5 Reviews
We live our lives through our emotions, writes Robert Solomon, and it is our emotions that give our lives meaning. What interests or fascinates us, who we love, what angers us, what moves us, what bores us--all of this defines us, gives us character, constitutes who we are.
In True to Our Feelings, Solomon illuminates the rich life of the emotions--why we don't really und
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Hardcover, 304 pages
Published November 1st 2006 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published February 1st 2001)
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Charles
Nov 03, 2011 Charles rated it it was amazing
Shelves: psychotherapy
Here a contemporary philosopher provides his highly-readable thoughts on how emotions form the turning center-point of our cognitions. His basic idea is that emotions are a way of knowing the world, his central thesis is that developing emotional integrity is the purpose of a higher life. Very rewarding to read, with applications for daily life as well as philosophical appreciation.
Steven Wright
Sep 08, 2012 Steven Wright rated it it was amazing
Finally someone to speak eloquently of the importance of the emotions for a meaningful life
Larisa
Dec 18, 2016 Larisa rated it it was ok
This book occupies the unholy middle ground between an academic text and a popular one. It is all over the place, and some of the places it goes seem apt while others seem deeply mistaken. And, for the pedants at home, he misquotes Hobbes! Alas.
Eva
Jan 28, 2017 Eva rated it it was ok
Despite my interest in cognition, I could not get into this book at all. It took me three years to get through it, and that only by, in the end, skimming the last two chapters. Didn't seem to have a coherent thesis or presentation.
Диана
Oct 19, 2014 Диана rated it it was amazing
A really good book. A rare thing in the otherwise dispirited world of academic writing.

Note to self: still have a few chapters to go as I have to return the book to the library.
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Robert C. Solomon (September 14, 1942 – January 2, 2007) was a professor of continental philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin.

Early life

Solomon was born in Detroit, Michigan. His father was a lawyer, and his mother an artist. After earning a B.A. (1963) at the University of Pennsylvania, he moved to the University of Michigan to study medicine, switching to philosophy for an M.A. (1965)
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