Tik-Tok of Oz
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Tik-Tok of Oz (Oz #8)

3.84 of 5 stars 3.84  ·  rating details  ·  4,037 ratings  ·  126 reviews
Last in the series of Baum's captivating "Oz" books, with the Queen of Oogaboo's attempt to conquer the world, the Shaggy Man's search for his lost brother, Tik-Tok's efforts to help, the battle with the Nome King, Polychrome's pitiful plight, and other escapades. 93 black-and-white illustrations by famed Oz illustrator John R. Neill.
Paperback, 302 pages
Published April 14th 1994 by Dover Publications (first published 1914)
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Emily
Mr. Baum, Mr. Baum, Mr. Baum. Really?? Don't you remember that Shaggy and Polychrome met each other and traveled together three books ago? Or that the Love Magnet doesn't need to be seen to work? And why on earth did you change the Nome King's name from Roquat to Ruggedo? Even my 9-year-old remembered that Ozma had told him his name after he drank from the Waters of Oblivion before she sent him back home through the tunnel. If Ozma has the Nome King's Magic Belt, she doesn't need the Wizard to t...more
Anne Langston
I don't know, but as I read this, I wondered whether this book was originally a non Oz book that was reworked to be fit into the Oz series. There are some glaring inconsistencies--for instance, Polychrome and the Shaggy Man not only met in Road to Oz but spent most of the book in each other's company, yet neither seems to know the other in this book, the Love Magnet works differently than in Road to Oz, and for a land that's been cut off, it's remarkably easy for the inhabitants of Oz to get out...more
Shoshana
Feb 22, 2012 Shoshana rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: people
This is actually one of my favorites, but it only gets four (or 4.5?) stars for a few reasons. One of them is the recurring gendered nature of styles of foolishness. I am referring to Ann Soforth choosing to conscript the men of Oogaboo into an army and conquer the world, much the same way Jellia Jamb conscripted an army of girls to conquer the Emerald City back in The Land of Oz, their motivations being they are tired of housework. Which could be a feminist kind of thing, except it's not. They'...more
Wils Cain
It cracks me up how he really tries to wrap up every book as the last and then he introduces the next one by very nicely saying "the kids won't leave me be." I enjoyed all the new characters and finally someone from Kansas other than Dorothy being obnoxious. The story mostly revolves around all new characters with Dorothy thrown in at the end.
Alena
Best part of this story, written in 1914, was when Ozma called the Shaggy Man on a "wireless telephone", a device invented by the Wizard that allowed them to converse with perfect ease without a wire connection. Yes, the Wizard invented cellphones. Crazy!!
Kylie
There's a movie called Return to Oz and I've always wandered about Tik Tok until I worked up to his book in the series. This is a great book especially for reading to children going to bed.
Eric
May 06, 2012 Eric rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: children
Recommended to Eric by: self
Baum continues to create a wonderful world that is fantastical in nature with this particular book. As we get further away from the book that was supposed to end it all (The Emerald City of Oz) we can see some of the joy returning to the writing of the series. He tells stories that entertain and he understands now that his audience wanted more of these stories. He seems to have a deeper respect for what he created with these books by this book than he has in the previous volume (The Patchwork Gi...more
Steve
Sep 14, 2007 Steve rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: everyone
Shelves: adventure
This is my favorite Oz book. It's a story about a young girl named Betsy that gets washed overboard with her mule Hank and winds up in Oz. There she encounters a Rose Princess, the Gnome King, and the Rainbow's Daughter, and Tik-Tok himself, among others. It's also the story of Ann of Oogaboo, the Queen of the smallest kingdom in Oz, who sets out on a mission with an army of 13 officers in a bid to conquer the Emerald City. I mean, come on. The Wizard of Oz? Pshaw.
Jennifer
This is one of the Oz books that I...keep forgetting entirely. Maybe it's that the cast isn't very compelling or memorable, and the plot is more disjointed than usual. I miss Dorothy and Ozma, so I might be a bit biased against Betsy Bobbin, I confess.
Mareklamo
Even roses can be misogynists.
Roselyn - bookmarkedpages
One of the more plot driven Oz books, Tik-Tok of Oz is in fact not about Oz, but other fairy lands. After hearing so much about Oz and seeing the same sights and characters, it was nice to experience other lands. There is not enough substance to Oz itself for it to be the setting of so many books, so by incorporating other lands, the series can extend a lot further. There is Oogaboo where all things grow on trees, the Rose Garden where the flowers are alive, and the kingdom of the Great Titi-Hoo...more
Myles
With Tik-Tok I can cautiously believe that Baum had again become a little interested in his most famous creation. He is still recycling plots, forgetting what he wrote last year, and throwing in the odd reader-suggestion, but this felt like an actual adventure. The first one since Ozma! Ojo's journey in Patchwork Girl felt too episodic and meant nothing in the end.

A young woman sets out to expand her kingdom with an army consisting of a single private and a pack of lazy officers runs into the di...more
Michelle
Tik-Tok of Oz doesn't fit comfortably into the rest of the series (not that, by book 8, the stories all fit nicely together). Editor Peter Glassman notes that Baum wanted to write a musical play based on Ozma of Oz, but had already sold the theatrical rights. As a workaround, the ever ambitious Baum basically re-wrote the story in play-form starring Betsy Bobbin and Queen Ann Soforth to replace Dorothy and Ozma.

Later, the play got re-worked into Tik-Tok of Oz. Like all of the Oz books, this one...more
Will Waller
Tik-Tok of Oz was a strange departure from the typical format of the Oz books thus far. There was little to no Dorothy, Toto, Glinda, or Ozma. Instead, action focuses on other characters who had heretofore been sideline characters like Tik-Tok and the Shaggy Man. I can sense that the author, Baum, got frustrated with Dorothy and the rest and perhaps believed them too predictable for his taste and wanted to dwell on others rather than the Usual Suspects.

This book is probably my favorite because...more
Elinor  Loredan
Baum certainly had a fertile imagination! The complexity of this story, in places, events, and magic, is astonishing, and even bewildering. My favorite fairy features (to borrow his alliterative style of naming chapters) are the book trees in Files' orchard, Glinda's Magic Book, the light maidens, and the metal forest. The Love Magnet is controversial: if we could make people adore us by force with a device, would we use it?

In Tik-Tok are combined 'ordinary' folk--Betsy, Hank, Shaggy--and extrao...more
Judi
I loved the Oz books as a child. I drew maps of the four lands of Oz and I spent a lot of time engaging in Oz related play. I remember the thrill I felt at The Book Table (our local bookstore) at seeing a new set of Oz books that came out in Paperback when I was about ten. We had Tik-Tok of Oz in my home growing up - I believe it was my Mother's book originally, though she got it used from somewhere else, there is a name and address in Visalia CA on the front page. In fact, the copyright date of...more
J.J. Lair
This book has a few twists from the start. Princess Ann sounds snobby and impatient in chapter one. She decides to conquer a land just to have a better place to rule. Oh, great another conquering Oz story.
The next few chapters tell about Betsy, Hank, the returns of Polychrome, Shaggy Man and TikTok. They join together to help Shaggy find is lost brother, which is believed to be with The Metal King. The Metal king has a long eared listener who can hear what people say in other lands and he learn...more
Therese
$0.0

This book is a departure from the other Oz books although it is filled with adventure and many other interesting characters and creatures.

Betsy Bobbin and Hank (her donkey from Oklahoma) are shipped wrecked in the land of Oz and come across Queen Ann and her unusual army of 18. Soon they are joined by Rose, Polychrome, and the Tik-Tok appears in the story because he is looking for Shaggy Man who has somehow gotten to the land from our land and is imprisoned by the evil King Nome. When he dis...more
Melani
This is one of the more enjoyable OZ books, for all that it also highlights some of the big problems the OZ books have. I think it’s so successful because there it is a voyage novel, rather than one where the characters try to solve a problem. Thus Baum’s problems with plot aren’t quite as evident here. And so long as you accept that it follows the formula of, characters form a party and go on various adventures then this novel is an easy read.

I do have problems with it though. The first is the...more
Alex Scales
Aug 03, 2012 Alex Scales marked it as bookstobuy  ·  review of another edition
These past few months have been pretty bad for me and to deal with it I've been trying to just focus on my art and let the rest of the world fall away. But even that's starting to lead to an existential crisis of sorts. I feel like I'm missing something. Some sort of revelation or some sort of element I need to infuse into my life. Into my art.

So now I'm being all nostalgic and revisiting things that were a big deal to me as a kid, like Tik-Tok of Oz. My dad bought this for me waaay back (from t...more
Margaret Taylor
Or, what happens when you take a book that you vaguely remember from your early childhood and re-read it as an adult.

When I was a little kid, I remember going to Grandma’s house to look at her shelves of first-edition Oz books. A lot of people don’t realize that Oz was a series – there was way more to in than The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. They had these fabric bindings that were falling apart at the edges and these wacky lineart illustrations. We kids would get stern injunctions from the adults ar...more
Jason Pettus
(Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally. This review covers all 14 of the Baum Oz books, which is why it's found on all 14 book pages here.)

I think it's fairly safe by now to assume that nearly everyone in Western society is familiar with The Wizard of Oz, most of us because of the classic 1939 movie adaptation; and many realize as well tha...more
Susan
This is dating myself, but going on the old school American Idol judging scale, this book wouldn't register above a "just a'ight" from Randy. It's sort of a placeholder in the Oz saga, mostly because Baum feels like he's plagiarizing himself. The reader can't escape that uncanny deja lu feeling. The book's heroine, the too-cutesily-named Betsy Bobbin is a victim of a shipwreck (remember Dorothy going overboard at the beginning of Ozma of Oz?) and continues from there as nothing more than a Dorot...more
Richard
Baum has redeemed himself in my eyes with this, the eighth book in the series of Oz books. Despite the title, the book is primarily about the quest of the Shaggy Man to rescue his brother from the arch villain of Oz, the Gnome King. Despite having his entire memory erased in the previous book, he is still as evil and nasty as ever.

One of the things that had started to turn me off on the Oz books was how the end of the story seemed to come out of nowhere and tie up all the lose ends in a couple o...more
Mathew Walls
I didn't enjoy this one as much as the others. There was nothing really new in it, mostly just the nomes and characters from previous books. Betsy is indistinguishable from Dorothy, to the point that I can't understand why she exists at all. This book could easily have been about Dorothy instead and been almost identical. Also, I don't care for the shaggy man, I find him mildly irritating.
Meg McGregor
Tik-Tok of Oz is a very fun read! Most of the action takes place outside of OZ in the Nome Kingdom. Ruggedo is up to his old tricks and Baum introduces several new characters to the reader. Among them are Trot, Shaggy Man's Brother, and Hank, the Mule.

There are several plots intertwining which I feel make the book much more pleasant to read and enjoy.

Thoroughly entertaining, I enjoyed reading this book again.
Danns
It was great to be back to reading the Oz series with Avery. The cast of characters this time is fresh with Betsy Bobbin, Hank the Mule, Ozga and the Oogaboo entourage. Even more, we have our favourites Shaggy Man and Tik-Tok returning to round out the group. Ruggedo as the nemesis of the book always makes for good times.

How it started and where the story while it flowed was surprising to the both of us. The flow was great, that it was, and the pace held our attention without fail.

Finally the r...more
Fizzgig76
Betsy Bobbins and her mule Hank are shipwrecked in Oz and join the Shaggy Man, Queen Ann, the Army of Oogaboo, and Tik-Tok on a quest to rescue Shaggy Man's brother from the Nome King. As a stand alone book, Tik-Tok isn't that bad, but as part of the series it is pretty weak. There are errors in the story (Polychrome has met Shaggy before but both don't seem to remember and just possessing the Love Magnet causes people to love the owner...not seeing it) and Betsy Bobbin in this book is literally...more
Julia Brumfield
This was more or less a repeat of all the previous Dorothy stories that were combined together although with a somewhat new cast and another fairy-world that was thrown in. With the exception of a few spots it was definitely more or less a repeat while the ending was more or less dissatisfactory in more ways than one.
D M
here is the eighth book in the Oz series.

i have to say i am beginning to tire of the Baum books. the story felt regurgitated -part 'wonderful wizard of oz' and part 'ozma of oz.' betsy bobbin and hank are dorothy and toto. and i dont see the importance of tik-tok for which the book is titled. it should more aptly be titled 'the shaggy man of oz' since it revolves around him searching for his ugly brother. (side note: the shaggy man gets his own book in 1949 by baum scholar jack snow)

apart from...more
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Lyman Frank Baum was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American children's literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works (55 novels in total, 82 short stor...more
More about L. Frank Baum...
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (Oz, #1) Ozma of Oz (Oz, #3) The Marvelous Land of Oz (Oz, #2) The Road to Oz (Oz, #5) Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (Oz, #4)

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