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Where the Body Meets Memory: An Odyssey of Race, Sexuality and Identity
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Where the Body Meets Memory: An Odyssey of Race, Sexuality and Identity

3.67  ·  Rating Details  ·  55 Ratings  ·  11 Reviews
In Turning Japanese, poet David Mura chronicled a year in Japan in which his sense of identity as a Japanese American was transformed. In Where the Body Meets Memory, Mura focuses on his experience growing up Japanese American in a country which interned both his parents during World War II, simply because of their race. Interweaving his own experience with that of his fam ...more
ebook, 288 pages
Published September 29th 2010 by Anchor (first published 1996)
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Lamski Kikita
Don't get me wrong; this book is beautifully written. The author tells the story of his heritage and his family history that lead him towards being, or not being, his heritage in a very beautiful manner. I just couldn't get myself to enjoy a biography, of sorts, at all. I like to learn of people's different experiences and how race affects other factors like sexuality and identity, but I don't think it is that interesting to read, and for 300 pages... I really couldn't get myself to finish the b ...more
sdw
Dec 13, 2008 sdw rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Where the Body Meets Memory: An Odyssey of Race, Sexuality and Identity - the title captures this montage of memories, histories, and critical race analysis well. The book moves between Mura's attempts to imagine his parents' and grandparents' experiences with internment and his process of understanding and analyzing his sexuality, including an open relationship forged at Grinell in the midst of the counter-culture, and the way that race (particularly the way race is written on the body and int ...more
Stephen
Aug 08, 2007 Stephen rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The best memoirs are brave in the sense that I think the memoirist must be willing to convey as openly as possible certain "truths" about his or her life. David Mura's odyssey is detailed her through his strained connections to his sexuality, which revolve so much about his desire to reclaim a certain lost virile masculinity that is no doubt tied to not only his racial background, but the experience of his parents, who were both interned. I found the memoir willing to jump into the "muck" of the ...more
Wade
May 28, 2010 Wade rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book is squeamishly honest, incisive, and original in its examination of male heterosexuality and the impact of racism and particularly Japanese-American reactions to the internment camps and social mobility. Not only is this book instructive - good for use in academic settings - but it's also entertaining, interesting, and well-written.
meredith
Mar 11, 2007 meredith rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Unfortunately, I don't remember enough to comment too extensively...except that somehow Mura was able to relate an evening of masturbating while driving drunk on his way to a strip club, and somehow make it...interesting, aside from the shock value. Also, I met Mr. Mura, and he was quite nice.
Laura
Oct 21, 2012 Laura rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book was very interesting, and it got me thinking about things I never considered before. His writing is honest and raw, which makes it an easy read. I really learned a lot, and I really enjoyed his sense of voice. Definitely a good read!
Cynthia
Dec 30, 2007 Cynthia rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
i didn't like this book that much. i wasn't too into the cry-me-a-river feel to the whole book about a sansei who had a bunch of identity issues and only has relationships with white women.
Donnelle
Jan 11, 2010 Donnelle rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
sexual addiction . . . a topic not freely discussed ... here, Mura brings it to the light . . . with truth and passion . . . a powerful read.
Paolo
Aug 09, 2007 Paolo rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone.
A complicated, powerful, and engrossing memoir about white love, in all its discontents.
Mike
Mar 17, 2011 Mike rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A brave openness that Is rare.
Ruth
Lots of navel-gazing.
Serena
textbook
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David Mura (born 1952) is a Japanese American author, poet, novelist, playwright, critic and performance artist. He has published two memoirs, Turning Japanese: Memoirs of a Sansei, which won the Josephine Miles Book Award from the Oakland PEN and was listed in the New York Times Notable Books of the Year, and Where the Body Meets Memory: An Odyssey of Race, Sexuality and Identity (1995). His most ...more
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