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Dot.Con: How America Lost Its Mind and Money in the Internet Era

3.77  ·  Rating Details ·  211 Ratings  ·  14 Reviews
The Internet stock bubble wasn't just about goggle-eyed day traderstrying to get rich on the Nasdaq and goateed twenty-five-year-olds playing wannabe Bill Gates. It was also about an America that believed it had discovered the secret of eternal prosperity: it said something about all of us, and what we thought about ourselves, as the twenty-first century dawned. John Cassi ...more
ebook, 416 pages
Published October 13th 2009 by HarperCollins e-books (first published January 1st 2002)
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Carrie
Oct 06, 2008 Carrie rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: People who don't understand how the stock market works
I was afraid that this book was going to be annoying and only slightly informative, but I was pleasantly surprised to find that it was the other way around.

It was particularly interesting to be reading this as the world is experiencing the effects of another investment bubble (especially the author's optimistic prediction in the afterword, written in 2002, that another crash would be decades away).
Lucas
Apr 17, 2011 Lucas rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
It's especially fascinating to read now as it seems likely we'll have to refer to the events in this book as the first internet bubble. The new bubble at least would primarily wipe out venture capital investments- though I'm suspicious that if enough money was tied up in VC then the consequences of a crash could be bad for the rest of us in as in the way of the 'shadow banking system' of a few years ago was.

Valuations of companies derived from the share price when only 10% of shares are availabl
...more
Tommy /|\
Dec 10, 2010 Tommy /|\ rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Mr. Cassidy writes an excellent historical account of the dot.com bust. He spices the historical information with good descriptions of why certain things were done according to "business rules." Having worked for a defunct .com myself, I found this book to be quite informative about the one end of business all the technicians and developers didn't want to know about -- the cash flow. Looking back, many of the warning signs that Mr. Cassidy notes were there for all of us in the company to have se ...more
Tom Darrow
I read this book for an American Business history class in college. The class was great, and the lesson the professor taught on the topic of internet companies and the "dot com revolution" was also good, but this book was not. It was very dry and technical. Also, his conclusion (that the blame for the boom and bust of the revolution lies with millions of Americans, not specific people) is very naive and lukewarm.
Myles Nester
A good overview of the dot com bubble but perhaps written a little too close to the time to really place it into context. It often feels like the author doesn't want to understand the characters involved, or the causes of the bubble itself.

Its a competent and detailed analysis of an interesting economic era but I am still waiting for a book that really gets to grips with the dot com bubble in all its wilful insanity.
Myles Nester
A good overview of the dot com bubble but perhaps written a little too close to the time to really place it into context. It often feels like the author doesn't want to understand the characters involved, or the causes of the bubble itself.

Its a competent and detailed analysis of an interesting economic era but I am still waiting for a book that really gets to grips with the dot com bubble in all its wilful insanity.
Caitlin
May 02, 2011 Caitlin rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I read this while I was in college, but didn't truly appreciate it. I re-read it because I'm starting to notice a familiar trend with online businesses that make no profit and yet balloon in price. I wonder how long until the next bubble bursts?

Very well written, and educational. Definitely a must-read for anyone whose business is in software, the internet, or stock trading.
Byrne
Dec 03, 2016 Byrne rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
This book seemed more insightful when the NASDAQ 100 was under 2,000. The author knows more or less what happened, but doesn't really know why. Anyone who shared this skepticism about the Internet and shorter the stocks accordingly would have been broke by 1997, and then broke again some time in the mid-2000s.
John Levon
An entertaining read on the previous previous madness in the stock market. Written shortly after the dotcom crash, in a pre Google world, it's nowadays even more entertaining for how parts of it have dated amusingly (the AOL TimeWarner merge was "shrewd", no-one will ever buy clothes over the net, etc.).
Jeremy Raper
Jun 20, 2013 Jeremy Raper rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Excellent account of the Internet bubble in all its facets. Requires reading for anyone who lived through it, invests in tech stocks, or is interested in bubble formation generally
VitaminCaim
Apr 13, 2015 VitaminCaim rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Good info n shit
Sheryl
Sep 19, 2007 Sheryl is currently reading it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: entrepreneurs
The history of the commercialization of the Internet is a must read for entrepreneurs and those who enjoy technology.
Joseph Raffetto
Dec 08, 2012 Joseph Raffetto rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: business
I found the history of bubbles in TV and Radio to be analogous of the Internet craziness. If anyone had a sense of business history, they would have seen that the bubble would be bursting.
Larsenross
Mar 27, 2012 Larsenross rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Larsenross by: my son
This book is about the wild west in the computer age.

This is a sad story of deception. A typical Wall Street story that took place in Silicon Valley.
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John Cassidy is a journalist at The New Yorker and a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books. He is the author of Dot.con: How America Lost Its Mind and Money in the Internet Era and lives in New York City.
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