The Complete Tommy And Tuppence
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The Complete Tommy And Tuppence (Tommy and Tuppence #5)

3.33 of 5 stars 3.33  ·  rating details  ·  3,991 ratings  ·  247 reviews
All five Tommy & Tuppence novels in a collectable box to coincide with the new BBC TV series. Tommy and Tuppence, two young people short of money and restless for excitement, embark on a daring business scheme -- Young Adventurers Ltd. Their advertisement says they are 'willing to do anything, go anywhere', and their first assignment plunges them into more danger than...more
Paperback, 1800 pages
Published November 4th 2002 by HarperCollins (first published January 1st 1973)
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Troy Blackford
People seem to really dislike this one, but if you go into it understanding it is the last of the books she wrote during the period where her mental faculties were failing, when she was writing things like 'Elephants Can Remember,' it really isn't completely horrible. Tommy and Tuppence are elderly in this story, and much of the banter centers around not being able to remember things - you can tell this was a preoccupation with Christie. Interesting enough as a story though it links a little wit...more
Kathryn
A very tedious, dull and disappointing finale for the Tommy and Tuppence series. Not even sure why she wrote it--and I rather wish I had not wasted my time reading it...
Gavin
The last of the Tommy and Tuppence books from Ms. Christie and I have to say the worst. It's all a bit wishy washy and there's no clear resolution, which is odd for Christie. Until the end I had been expecting a lot more, but it was a bit of a damp squib, sad though I am to say that about one of the Queen of Crime's works.
Laurel Young
"I like people who stick together and enjoy their marriage and go on enjoying it." So says one of the Beresfords' friends, and I agree. The chief charm of Postern of Fate is seeing dear Tommy and Tuppence once more. Unlike Miss Marple and Poirot, who start out elderly and retired (respectively) in the 1920/30s and age very little for the rest of Dame Agatha's career, Tommy and Tuppence age believably over the years. The "young adventurers" were introduced in Christie's second novel, The Secret A...more
Peter
"The last novel Agatha Christie wrote (published 1973), and it can best be described as out-of-focus. The whole thing reads like a first draft; where were her editors? Tommy and Tuppence are back, having just moved into a new house, and they unearth a cold case mystery dating back 60 years to a beautiful spy from pre WWI.

However, Agatha was preoccupied with navel-gazing and recollections of childhood, and the central mystery only occasionally interrupts these endless remembrances. Weirdly, all...more
Tara
I love Agatha Christie. Adore her, even. I read her on practically every vacation, because she's brilliant and fun. Which is why I hated this book so much. It was dreadful for anyone to have written, but especially Christie. Postern of Fate is a mystery with no suspects, no action, no clues, no climax. Did she even have an editor for this? The second to last chapter was a random family reunion that had nothing to do with the story. Perhaps it would've been a good epilogue, but you just don't sti...more
Philip
Forewarned is forearmed: POSTERN OF FATE was the last book Christie wrote, and is and generally conceded to be her worst (actually, she was dictating into a tape recorder at this time, and had been doing so since the late 1960s, which accounts for the rather conversational tone of the later novels). She was still at the height of her powers with 1967's ENDLESS NIGHT (quite a departure for her), but her subsequent decline was marked and swift (it's now believed that an undetected early senility m...more
Ann
This book was okay... the mystery was a little confusing and though T&T were still cute they didn't interact much (if I'm recalling correctly) which is the best part about the books. While I'd *highly* recommened the first three T&T books, I'd not really recommened the last two...
Katharine
I read Postern of Fate because it was on the free shelf at the library and I was looking for something light to read. After a quick flip-through I determined I hadn't read it before, so I brought it home. After I started it I realized why I haven't read it before. It's one of Christie's last novels, written in 1973 or something like that. I've found that the quality of Agatha Christie's writing really deteriorates with any of her later stuff, written after 1965 or so. This is a Tommy and Tuppen...more
Dhuaine
I usually don't review volumes from huge series of similar novels, but I feel I should warn people against this one book. It's atrocious. Everything happens in dialogues, which could be interesting, if only something was really happening. Unfortunately, the dialogues repeat the same things all and over (sometimes even characters themselves realize that they've spoken of something already), revelations are revealed several times, all information is repeated, and all this is mixed with tons of dig...more
Meave
I can't give it two stars because it's Tommy and Tuppence, and I am very fond of them. However, this is another embarrassing example of old Aggie attempting to combine her classic detective style with her later-in-life obsession with New World Order and conspiracy theories, and it's awful. There's no proper resolution, minor characters are picked up and dropped at random, and she bangs on about Mr. Robinson being "yellow-faced" in a really ugly way. Lady, you can't call people "yellow" unless th...more
Susan
I slogged through 4 (out of 6) discs in this audio and finally it defeated me. I cannot believe this was written by the queen of crime as it plodded along since the beginning of the story.

Not only that, she wrote the Beresfords as doddering seniors who seemed to ramble on about the smallest, inconsequential things. Tuppence more so than Tommy. For all intents and purposes, I could have been having tea with the dear and I would get the same story. There was alot of irrelevant stuff going on.

Tomm...more
Tali
I'd heard a lot, mainly here on Goodreads, about this being Christie's last novel, but it's also one of the most confusing of her novels. There's lots of talking, and when I say lots of talking, I mean that it could probably do with being about 100 pages shorter. The idea behind the mystery is intriguing, but so much time is spent getting to it and then lots of time wasted investigating the past that I found myself flicking forward to see how many pages I had left before it was all over. The mos...more
Sammy
In which a retired pair of amateur detectives discover an age-old mystery right under their noses.

So it has come to this. "Postern of Fate" was Agatha Christie’s final written work, and it is undoubtedly her worst. Yes, worse than those tawdry thrillers she churned out in the 1920s, or the spurious supernatural short story collections of the ’40s. In her defence, the octogenarian Dame Agatha was probably suffering from early onset dementia, but her editors should’ve seen sense in not damaging he...more
Clint
This was my first Agatha Christie book, read because my girlfriend really likes her and wanted me to read it, and man, it beats Madam Bovary as a book that I finished but was left forever scarred by due to its awfulness. It wasn't even a mystery, just a couple of old farts saying the same things over and over again, "So something happened here, you know, you here some things, something happened then, a long time ago, and people say things, and some things some people don't want other people lear...more
Vanessa Panerosa
This book starts off very strongly. The premise is exciting, eerie and provocative. However, I must say it's the worst Christie novel I've ever read. I finished it yesterday and am still so utterly confused by the ending. There's a whole list Tuppence makes full of "clues" and many of them are never answered or even touched upon. There are no real suspects or even solidified characters. The ending is lackluster with no twist or even resolution and a great deal of the novel is long dialogues that...more
Nancy McKibben
May 13, 2014 Nancy McKibben rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Christie fans
Shelves: mystery, reviewed
Postern of Fate
By Agatha Christie

I thought I had read most of Agatha Christie’s work, but an article about a BBC series planned for 2014 to celebrate Christie’s 125th birthday alerted me to Tommy and Tuppence, the married sleuths of four novels and a book of short stories. The books were not that easy to locate, and I ended up first reading The Secret Adversary, the first book, published in 1922, followed by Postern of Fate (dreadful title!), the last book in the series, published in 1973. Tommy...more
Nancy
I love Agatha Christie, and I love Tommy and Tuppence (the main characters in this book), but this book is...not good. It doesn't hang together at all; there's nothing clever about it; the writing is all over the place. My understanding is that while this wasn't the last Christie published, it was the last Christie written, and I think she was kind of losing it. Please don't read it if you've never read Christie. It'll ruin her for you, I'd bet, and she doesn't deserve that.
Sylvester
Absolutely love the way this story begins - Tuppence, looking through old children's books in the house they have just bought, finds a very disturbing message (I won't give it away), and is off on another hunt for the truth. Yes, the rest of the book goes downhill, however, I still enjoyed it - and considering all the new light cast on Christie's life, I can only shake my head in amazement at what this wonderful woman accomplished in spite of everything.
minky_monster
Masih dari buku pinjeman readingwalk.

Rasanya dulu gw pernah megang buku ini, tapi ga yakin apakah dibaca ato engga, soalnya itu buku pinjeman kakak gw, dan baru sehari-dua hari udah dibalikin lagi, jadi kayaknya belom yah. Mana judulnya aneh, dan katanya ceritanya ga jelas. Intinya ini adalah pertama kalinya gw betul-betul baca.
Merupakan seri Agatha Christie yg kurang begitu populer, yang menampilan pasangan Tommy dan Tuppence Beresford. Mereka adalah agen intelijen Inggris, yang sudah beberapa...more
Jann Barber
For September, our mystery book club members are to read a book by Agatha Christie. I have been a fan of hers since I started reading her books decades ago when I was a teen.

This book is one of the few she wrote about Tommy and Tuppence Beresford. They are retired by now, yet manage to stumble onto evidence that at least one, and possibly two murders occurred in the house they have just bought. At the time, the deaths were explained logically, but Tommy and Tuppence start digging and find that t...more
Rachel
This was horribly written, much to my dismay. Most of the dialogue was rambling and irrelevant, so I skimmed. I do not skim! The resolution was out-of-the-blue and practically meaningless. Little plot, few characters...shocking from Agatha Christie! Our main duo was boring, and I'd adored them in all the earlier books.
Darius
Agatha Christie wrote many great books, but unfortunately this one is the worst I have read. Maybe because it was her last book, written when she was 82. The plot was confusing with all those unnecessary politics, so many meaningless dialogues, some chapters in the beginning can be excluded and actually nothing will change. There was no mystery or that feeling when you are rushing through the book to reach the end to find out who is the murder. To be mentioned the ending by itself was more than...more
Julie
If it wasn't Agatha Christie, I would have given it one star. It was really quite bad. However, it is Christie's last book (others were published after this one, but actually written earlier) and I really wanted to get through it, so I did.

On the bright side, Tommy and Tuppence are back. Their interplay is as fun as always and this time they have a delightful Manchester Terrier, Hannibal, who is a very well written character.

On the less bright side, the mystery is just a mess, the pace is snail...more
writer...
Abridged Audio Renaissance Audiobook
Publisher: St Martin's Press
Length: 3 hrs

Agatha Christie's final novel bringing a historical wartime event into the present day lives of Tommy and Tuppence Beresford's retirement...

Interesting premise begins the story as Tommy and Tuppence move into their house purchased with intent to retire. Going through books left behind, Tuppence is suspicious of underlined phrases she discovers in a copy of The Black Arrow. An astonishing message results that sets her o...more
Lola
This is one of her later books. I heard on NPR about a study that analyzed Agatha Christie's work and found that toward the end, as dementia set in, she used fewer unique words and more "empty words" such as "something," "anyone," "anything," etc. I don't recall meeting more of those words here, but this book is pointlessly drawn-out and dull, with oddly repetitive dialogue that often serves no purpose. There are so many throwaway references to one of the protagonists' previous cases that they s...more
Amina
My first Agatha Christie book. Not a good one. So Mary Jordan did not die naturally. You find out how unnatural her death was pretty soon into the book. And naturally you don't believe that's really what happen because hey this is a mystery and mysteries don't get disclosed until the end; but it turns out it is how it went down. Then there are these little mysteries like how did Alexander Parkinson know about Mary's unnatural death. Whats inside truelove and Mathilde. Why old Isaac was killed. B...more
Michiyo 'jia' Fujiwara
"Apa yang menyebabkan kematiannya?" "Ada orang yang membawa daun foxglove yang tercampur dengan daun bayam dari kebun. Dan mereka memakan tanpa sengaja. Tapi itu tak akan membuat orang mati.""Ya", kata Tuan Robinson. "Tapi kalau ada yang memasukkan digitalin alkaloid keras dalam kopi yang akan diminum Mary Jordan, atau dalam koktailnya, maka orang akan menyalahkan daun foxglove itu, dan kejadian itu dianggap 'kecelakaan'. Tapi Alexander Parker atau siapa nama anak itu? - dia terlalu tajam untuk...more
Kurt
I think this book could only have been this bad on purpose. I got the distinct impression that by this point in her career, Agatha Christie was ready to write some simple little stories about cozy villages and content retired people, but perhaps her editors and fans kept demanding murder mysteries, so she gave them one of the worst possible examples. Throughout the book, she stubbornly refuses to flesh out any suspects, and all of the action takes place offstage (for example, Tommy will arrive h...more
S_pumpkin
Осталась очень разочарована произведением. При том, что большую симпатию испытываю к тем романам Агаты Кристи, в которых поднимаются вопросы многолетней давности и раскрываются загадки прошлого, эта книга не вызвала ничего, кроме уныния. Здесь раскрытие преступления, покрытого слоем пыли это не выуживание улик по одной, поиск потерянных и забытых свидетельств, что лично меня всегда привлекает,ведь процесс этот гораздо более сложный, чем бег по горячим следам. Отнюдь, здесь это пересказ чужих пус...more
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Agatha Christie L...: April 2017 - Postern of Fate 1 2 Aug 15, 2014 08:57PM  
Postern of Fate vs Elephants Can Remember 4 15 Jan 08, 2014 07:32AM  
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Agatha Christie also wrote romance novels under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott, and was occasionally published under the name Agatha Christie Mallowan.

Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller was born in Torquay, Devon, England, U.K., as the youngest of three. The Millers had two other children: Margaret Frary Miller (1879–1950), called Madge, who was eleven years Agatha's senior, and Louis Montant Miller (1880...more
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“You don't appreciate a faithful husband when you've got one,' said Tommy.
'All my friends tell me you never know with husbands,' said Tuppance.
'You have the wrong kind of friends,' said Tommy.”
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“I suppose without curiosity a man would be a tortoise. Very comfortable life, a tortoise has. Goes to sleep all winter and doesn't eat anything more than grass as far as I know, to live all the summer. Not an interesting life perhaps, but a very peaceful one.” 0 likes
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