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The Bride of the Mistletoe

liked it 3.0  ·  Rating Details ·  7 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - Any one about to read this work of fiction might properly be apprised beforehand that it is not a novel: it has neither the structure nor the purpose of The Novel. It is a story. There are two characters - a mid ...more
Paperback, 132 pages
Published January 12th 2005 by 1st World Library (first published 1909)
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Cheryl Sailor
Nov 07, 2016 Cheryl Sailor rated it really liked it
More than anything, The Bride of the Mistletoe is a tragedy at its core. The author blends the tragedy with lush descriptions of nature, particularly trees and of course his native state of Kentucky.

The story involves two middle aged people in a Kentucky farm house who have had children, have had deaths in the family and have intimately shared each others lives and thoughts for decades. The tragedy comes wrapped on Christmas eve, also significantly their wedding anniversary, in a gift from the h
...more
Sherry Chandler
Jan 17, 2009 Sherry Chandler rated it it was ok
Set aside the racism ("frolicking servants"), sexism (a wife whose world revolves around her husband), and purple prose style, this is an odd little Christmas tale in which Allen seems to be trying to make a parallel between a modern marriage and a legend that ancient druids sacrificed a mistletoe bride to the god of the oak tree.

As you may gather, it seems to be a species of horror story.

Allen is considered Kentucky's local colorist. Mark Twain is the only writer who rose above that genre. Alle
...more
Jacqueline
Oct 20, 2013 Jacqueline rated it it was ok
Very old fashioned writing, but has lasting value as insight into the nineteenth century.
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James Lane Allen was an American novelist and short story writer whose work often depicted the culture and dialects of his native Kentucky. His work is characteristic of the late-19th century local color era, when writers sought to capture the vernacular in their fiction. Allen has been described as "Kentucky's first important novelist."
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