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Hallowe'en Party (Hercule Poirot #36)

3.66 of 5 stars 3.66  ·  rating details  ·  13,982 ratings  ·  712 reviews
Mystery writer Ariadne Oliver has been invited to a Hallowe'en party at Woodleigh Common. One of the other guests is an adolescent girl known for telling tall tales of murder and intrigue -- and for being generally unpleasant. But when the girl, Joyce, is found drowned in an apple-bobbing tub, Mrs Oliver wonders after the fictional nature of the girl's claim that she had o ...more
ebook, 272 pages
Published October 3rd 2006 by William Morrow Paperbacks (first published 1969)
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Pigletto Apart from the fact that Joyce is murdered during a hallowe'en party this book has nothing to do with hallowe'en. So, if you are reading it because…moreApart from the fact that Joyce is murdered during a hallowe'en party this book has nothing to do with hallowe'en. So, if you are reading it because you want to read something spooky or a book that has witches in it or something else associated with hallowe'en then it's the wrong choice. It's just a murder mystery story.(less)
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Community Reviews

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Nov 01, 2015 Carol. rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: mystery fans, Christie fans
While some of Agatha Christie’s mysteries remain immensely satisfying, there are a few that just don’t work, whether from cultural shift or a more experimental approach. I was worried when I picked up Hallowe’en Party; I had been operating with a suspicion that her best work was earlier in her extensive career. However, it wasn’t long before my concern was dismissed as I settled into an engrossing tale of Hercule Poirot investigating a murder at a Halloween party.

Poor Joyce; thirteen and a bit d
mark monday
Choose Your Own Adventure!

You are a truly annoying little girl. A busybody, a liar. Who can trust you? For the good of the community, a-bobbin' for apples you must go – like permanently. But death is not the end! From on high you witness the actions of a strange mustached man and his flighty authoress sidekick. Together they vow to avenge your murder and lay your lovely bones to rest. They believe in your tale of dastardly deeds and murder, the tale that brought you to such an untimely end; thei
Bridgette Redman
I am a big fan of Agatha Christie. I love her writing and have read piles and piles of her books.

So I feel a bit queasy when my first review of one of her books is panning it.

But I can’t recommend this book to anyone—especially not to anyone who hasn’t read Agatha Christie before. You might get the impression that she is a hack, formulaic writer with cardboard characters who all spout the same dialog. You might read this book and think that Agatha Christie writes mysteries with predictable plot
While helping to decorate for an upcoming HALLOWE'EN PARTY a contentious thirteen year old comments that she once witnessed a murder, but when no one believes her, she high-tails it for home, and only a few hours later, after the party, she is found drowned in the apple-bobbing tub........hence another murder mystery to solve for ole Hercule Poirot with his manicured to perfection mustache, too tight patent leather shoes and never-ending search for the truth.

Really enjoyed this one! (perhaps bc

Stephanie Swint
It is Autumn, this week there have been storm clouds in the sky and wind pulling leaves off branches. I am preparing for Halloween and hopefully a horde of trick or treaters who will be knocking on doors in the near future. In my preparation, I was also listening to Christie’s ‘Hallowe’en Party.’ It is a book I have not read by an author I consider an old friend – even if I never met her. Agatha Christie and her beloved Belgian Hercule Poirot are special to me. I watched the series with Hugh Fra ...more
Here's some free advice: If you want to impress people at a party, choose some topic other than "when I was a kid I saw a murder but I didn't know it was a murder and I just figured it out and isn't it awful and aren't I clever."

Cracking good mystery, what what. Halfway through I thought I had it figured out, but it turned out I had only about 5 percent of it right. You expect red herrings in any mystery novel, but this one had about two dozen. I was SO SURE the guy with the fake beard would tur
Reading Agatha Christie is like sinking into a La-Z Boy with a glass of sweet tea. Comforting regardless of the time or season. I habitually re-read her and often don't remember until I am halfway through the book that this is indeed a re-read. My first clue is that I "solve" the mystery too quickly!

My favorite Christie's are those with enough clues that we the reader can actually solve the puzzle. This particular story does not fit that mold. Poirot has to jump to conclusions and access informa
While preparing for the upcoming Hallowe’en Party, thirteen-year-old Joyce Reynolds begins boasting about a murder she claims to have been a witness to many years ago. The reason she gives for not coming forward sooner was she didn’t realize it was an actual murder until recently. For the most part, no one took much notice of her ramblings but someone apparently did. At the Hallowe’en Party, Joyce was found drowned in the apple-bobbing tub. The immediate reasoning for her own death seems to be t ...more
Kasia S.
I love reading mysteries because they really made my brain tick. They deliver more than a mindless hobby, which reading can sometimes be and really gear me up and make me alert for clues, suspects and provide with great satisfaction when I find myself on the right track. Having said that, Agatha Christie and her charming books fit that hunger to a tee, I find their slightly old fashioned approach so charming and alluring that I always finding myself craving them. She is still my favorite mystery ...more
Ivonne Rovira
Dame Agatha Christie penned Hallowe’en Party quite late in her career; it was published in the United Kingdom late in 1969. Consequently, readers, more accustomed to mentions of absinthe than of L.S.D. and of manservants than of miniskirts, will find mentions of long-haired hippies and hipsters “wearing a rose-coloured velvet coat, mauve trouses and a kind of frilled shirting and other aspects of the swingin’ ’60s a bit jarring. Don’t let that put you off. Hallowe’en Party has the same clever pl ...more
Laurel Young
Oh, how I love this novel. I re-read it nearly every Hallowe'en. It is the last great novel that Christie wrote featuring Poirot; after this, he appeared in the not-so-good Elephants Can Remember, and then came the final Curtain (actually written many years earlier). It also features Mrs. Ariadne Oliver at her absolute best--one sees so much of Christie in her fictional avatar, especially her wonderful sense of humor. Mrs. Oliver is allowed to express many thoughts on the trials of writing myste ...more
Sophie Hannah
Enjoyable, but not one of Agatha's best books. The solution felt weirdly detached from the mystery.
Susan Johnson
I first read this book 40 years ago and after reading it again had to drop a star. Still I loved the actual Halloween party. I liked the bobbing for apples that I did in my youth but doubt it's done now. I liked the flour tower and showing pictures of future husbands. It made me very nostalgic. I would love to see the quarry garden.

After all these years it still holds its own and makes me remember how I got hooked on mysteries.
Mrs Ariadne Oliver visits her friend Poirot in an agitated state of mind. She has recently attended a Halloween Party given for children and teenagers. A shocking death occurs which sets the small village of Woodleigh Common on the defensive. Poirot finds that evidence is not easy to gather, neighbours are vague, evasive, curiously unsympathetic and self-involved.

Published in 1969 this is a later novel by Christie. The changing times, both in society and in the criminal justice system, are often
An interesting case for M.Poirot. A young girl is found drowned in the keg of bobbing apples at a Hallowe'en party just hours after declaring she had witnessed a murder. Poirot must discover if there are two murders to be solved or just one. This was an intricate little mystery and I honestly couldn't figure it out right til the end.
not a ton of Halloween stuff, but still enjoyable nonetheless, kicking off my Agatha Christie reading.
So my month of Halloween/Horror themed books for October continues as I give "Hallowe'en Party" by the fantastic Agatha Christie as whirl. Yes, I know this isn't a horror book, but I am a huge Agatha Christie fan and this "Halloween" themed book fit perfectly into October and I wasn't dissapointed.

The following may or may not contain spoilers:

A young girl named Joyce attends a Halloween party in a small English town and announces at the preperations of the party that she had once witnessed a mur
So much for my silly Halloween books resolution; this book was terrible.

The premise is that a girl named Joyce gets killed at a Halloween party hosted by the control freak Mrs. Drake. She is drowned in a bucket used for bobbing for apples in the library of Mrs. Drake's home. The authoress Ariadne Oliver is at the party and she senses there is more to this death than a random act of violence. She brings in Poirot to investigate.

The first 1/2 of the book was nothing but Poirot going around and int
I really enjoyed this book up until the end. The resolution wasn't clear to me - for example, how did the two teenage boys know that Miranda was being abducted by one of the murderers? Earlier on in the book, their guesses about the identity of Joyce's murderer wildly miss the mark, so how did they suddenly catch on to the whole plot? I also don't understand why Miranda realised that she had seen a murder years ago, but then later expressed surprise that one of the perpetrators was considered a ...more
It took me a little longer to finish this book because of the actual Halloween activities. It was worth it. I love how AC lays out everything and then the slow reveal. This story was awesome and even though the events don't happen on the actual date of Halloween, they are sufficiently creepy for the season. It was a great read!
When I found this at the used bookstore, I was sure it would be the perfect read for Halloween. Things didn't quite go as planned for me that day so I ended up finishing the following morning. And, you know, that was fine. This isn't horror and it didn't tickle any of my Hallowe'en fancies. The name is simply due to the fact that the mystery begins at a children's Halloween party.

I took a ton of notes while reading but I think I'll just keep the review short and simple. Hallowe'en Party was jus
This is very much a later Christie novel – written in 1969 and virtually one of the last Poirot novels she wrote. Poirot is very much, like the author I suspect, feeling his age. We meet him bemoaning the fact that a friend is probably cancelling a visit and contemplating another dull evening, when he gets a call from his old friend, Mrs Ariadne Oliver. Mrs Oliver, a crime author, had been visiting a friend and helping with the organisation for a joint Halloween/11+ party for some children. Duri ...more
Proof that, even at her most middling, Christie was a mastermind at these kinds of stories, since the mystery is tight, surprising and kissed with a bizarre kind of genius I've never seen another mystery writer replicate.

This was the first of Christie's novels that I read, in my teens; my great aunt's book club edition, with it's bold orange and black cover, proved too great a lure for me, a lover of all things Halloween. And the book is seeped in the atmosphere of the autumnal season, from the
Nancy Oakes
This is a reread especially for Halloween which is coming at the end of this month.I didn't like it as much this time around as I did the first time -- I must somehow and despite myself be gaining a semblance of reading maturity.

Having recently watched the excellent dramatization of this book on DVD (with David Suchet, of course, as Poirot and Zoe Wanamaker the absolutely perfect Ariadne Oliver), I figured I'd give Christie's Hallowe'en Party another go in book form. After finishing it late yes
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
During the preparations for a Halloween party a young girl, Joyce, proclaims that she once saw a murder done. Nobody believes the girl, even though she insists it’s true, and the preparations for the party are finished without anyone paying anymore attention to the girl’s statement.
Later that evening, after the party has taken place and everybody is going home again, young Joyce is found, drowned in the bucket that was used for apple bobbing.
Mrs. Ariadne Oliver, an author of mysteries and friend
Samantha Pedroza
Well there you have it! If you're going to blab the jab then take the stab or in this case apple bobbing drowning. I enjoyed myself! Once again my AC doesn't fail me! The majority of the book is a series of interviews very little happens off that besides the ending and a few sore feet and majestic garden quarry side drawings, but I found myself forming an ending and having it be shot down by a clue. I was surprised by a pairing I'll say that much is for sure! Overall a good quick read for the pe ...more
I read somewhere that Agatha Christie found Hercules Poirot insufferable towards the end of her life but kept on writing about him because fans loved him. I agree -- I also found him insufferable. I haven't read mysteries in awhile although when I was little, I read a lot of Nancy Drew, Boxcar Children and the Bobbsey Twins -- but I prefer mysteries where everything is not what it seems and I can't figure out in the first chapter what will happen in the rest of the book.
Ruthie Jones
Hallowe'en Party was published in 1969, and Christie peppered this story with references of the time such as LSD, hippies, and even computers. I'm not sure if her personal preferences are shining through in this story, but if they are, it means she wasn't too happy with society in the late 1960s. And almost every page makes some sort of remark about people who are mentally insane, mentally unstable, and mentally retarded. Apparently, everyone is a nut, and children are either stupid or liars.

3.5 Stars

The ending made up for a dull middle portion. I did guess the culprit/culprits but the motives were way different than what I thought. Dame Christie never fails to surprise and shock me.
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Agatha Christie also wrote romance novels under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott, and was occasionally published under the name Agatha Christie Mallowan.

Agatha Christie is the best-selling author of all time. She wrote eighty crime novels and story collections, fourteen plays, and several other books. Her books have sold roughly four billion copies and have been translated into 45 languages. She is t
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Other Books in the Series

Hercule Poirot (1 - 10 of 43 books)
  • The Mysterious Affair at Styles (Hercule Poirot, #1)
  • The Murder on the Links (Hercule Poirot, #2)
  • Poirot Investigates (Hercule Poirot, #3)
  • The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Hercule Poirot, #4)
  • The Big Four (Hercule Poirot, #5)
  • The Mystery of the Blue Train (Hercule Poirot, #6)
  • Black Coffee (Hercule Poirot, #7)
  • Peril at End House (Hercule Poirot, #8)
  • Lord Edgware Dies (Hercule Poirot, #9)
  • Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10)

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