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My Own Private Germany: Daniel Paul Schreber's Secret History of Modernity
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My Own Private Germany: Daniel Paul Schreber's Secret History of Modernity

4.20  ·  Rating Details  ·  20 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
In November 1893, Daniel Paul Schreber, recently named presiding judge of the Saxon Supreme Court, was on the verge of a psychotic breakdown and entered a Leipzig psychiatric clinic. He would spend the rest of the nineteenth century in mental institutions. Once released, he published his Memoirs of My Nervous Illness (1903), a harrowing account of real and delusional perse ...more
Hardcover, 240 pages
Published May 5th 1996 by Princeton University Press (first published April 15th 1996)
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Andrea
Mar 22, 2012 Andrea rated it it was amazing
Santner slowely develops a daring and inspiring theory of modernity by closely reading Schreber's Memoirs together with a number of Schreber's contemporaries. He intertwines Freud's reading of the Schreber case with institutional crisis of psychoanalysis, Benjamin's remarks on decay and violence, Foucault's insights in the 19th century progress of psychiatry, the rise of anti-Semitism in the 19th century, and Kafka's fictional world. It took me a couple of days to read the book, the argumentatio ...more
Chris Schaeffer
Nov 13, 2011 Chris Schaeffer rated it really liked it
An excellent study of Schreber, cited by Zizek throughout the mid-90s and onwards if that's your kind of thing. Santner's reading of Schreber is really admirably flexible and supple, and he even takes a conciliatory stance towards Freud, but sometimes he struts his stuff a bit, gets a bit too absolute. Really lovely though, and very useful for a wide range of fields. Great little reading of Certeau near the end too, and his employment of Sedgwick was so elegant I started laughing in dumb fucking ...more
Bradley
Mar 14, 2009 Bradley rated it liked it
Daniel Schreber was crazy. What this book points out is Schreber was less crazy than his parents and Germany society is even crazier still!
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