The Loudwater Mystery
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The Loudwater Mystery

3.13 of 5 stars 3.13  ·  rating details  ·  15 ratings  ·  5 reviews
Lord Loudwater was paying attention neither to his breakfast nor to the cat Melchisidec. Absorbed in a leader in The Times newspaper, now and again he tugged at his red-brown beard in order to quicken his comprehension of the weighty phrases of the leader-writer; now and again he made noises, chiefly with his nose, expressive of disgust. Lady Loudwater paid no attention to...more
ebook, 281 pages
Published December 2nd 2010 by Pubone.Info (first published 1920)
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Marts  (Thinker)
Lord Loudwater isn't well-liked, so when he's found murdered it takes quite alot to figure out which one of the suspects could have committed the crime...
Loudwater is murdered pretty early in the tale so the rest of it really covers all the mysterious elements attached to finding the murderer... I won't mind recommending this to classic mystery lovers...
Judy
A murder mystery -- almost anyone could have murdered Loudwater but discovering the actual killer took almost the entire story. For that fact, and that I liked all the "good guys" (and gals), I couldn't imagine any of them having done it. I don't like mysteries in which I can guess who committed the evil deed. This one kept me suspecting all and none.

France-Andrée
There was nothing original in the story. I enjoyed the characters, but the murderer is so easy to guess it takes away all the fun of it. (view spoiler).
Thom Swennes
It is not a question of winning or losing but ultimately how you play the game. This is a typically British attitude of fair play. A luckless kiss and thunderous snore form the basis for this early 20th Century murder mystery. Lord Loudwater was loved by none, feared by many and hated by all. When he is inexplicably found fatality stabbed with a letter opener, the list of suspects seems endless. Love and romantic intrigues only add to the ambiguities of the case. This spoof was published in 1920...more
Christy Parker
This book was originally published in 1920. It is well-written and entertaining. Some of the word choice may be antiquated for today's reader, but I did not find that this was prevalent.

I thought that this book had quite the surprise ending, as good murder mysteries should. I am rarely surprised by the reveal in a mystery, I've usually got it figured out by the time the author reveals it. If I haven't got it completely sussed, I at least have strong suspicion. That was not the case with this no...more
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Edgar Alfred Jepson (1863 - 1938) was an English writer, principally of mainstream adventure and detective fiction, but also of some supernatural and fantasy stories that are better remembered. He used a pseudonym R. Edison Page for some of his many short stories, collaborating at times with John Gawsworth, Hugh Clevely and possibly Arthur Machen, long-term friends.

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