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Twenty Years After (The D'Artagnan Romances #2)

3.97 of 5 stars 3.97  ·  rating details  ·  12,144 ratings  ·  316 reviews
1898. Twenty Years After is the sequel to The Three Musketeers. Two decades have passed since the famous swordsmen triumphed over Cardinal Richelieu and Milady in The Three Musketeers. Time has weakened their resolve, and dispersed their loyalties. But treasons and stratagems still cry out for justice: civil war endangers the throne of France, while in England, Cromwell th ...more
Hardcover, 818 pages
Published September 10th 2010 by Kessinger Publishing (first published 1845)
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(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Phil
Wow! Just wow! I loved The Three Musketeers, but - if anything - I think that this was even better. Twenty Years After is the second installment in the Musketeers' tale (one that continues into a third part, 'Ten Years Later', which is normally split itself into three, the last of which is The Man in teh Iron Mask). That might be because I didn't' already know the story, but I think it was also because there's now a world-weariness about the four heroes. All now in their forties, they're almost ...more
Dan Gladwell
No one ever talks about Twenty Years After, and it's hard to find out it exists unless you're looking for more information on the Three Musketeers. I think the main reason behind this is just its bulk. It's a huge volume, and it is pretty daunting thinking you will be able to get through all those pages. However, it is still paced very well, and there is a lot of action here. Twenty Years after is much more character driven than Three Musketeers, and the emotional connection you feel to the char ...more
Jessica
I must admit, I didn't like this book at all. Not because it wasn't well written, and not because there was anything wrong with it (there wasn't, by the way), it's just that the characters in the book did not seem like my old "friends", the Four Musketeers! Yes, they were named "D'Argatan", "Athos", "Porthos" and "Aramis" but they didn't seem like the same characters to me.
It's interesting though, if you wanted to find out what happended to all the characters in "The Three Musketeers", but reall
...more
Duffy Pratt
This book pales in comparison to The Three Musketeers only because Mordaunt is a much less interesting villain than his mother, Milady. Again, it would not be too difficult to twist this story so that Mordaunt becomes no villain at all. His goal is simply to avenge the murder of his mother. To that end he stabs a man who was already dying, he kills another of the murderers on a field of battle, and he tries to blow up the remaining four. In his mind, he's simply trying to get for himself the jus ...more
K.
Oct 25, 2009 K. rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: adventure lovers
Shelves: french-lit
Better than "Three Musketeers." Characters are much more developed and fleshed out and mature. More mature and thought-provoking themes. Loved reading every minute of it. Not one dull moment in all its 800+ pages. I love Dumas' sense of humor. d'Artagnan and Porthos really stood out so much more in this one, witty and truly humorous--I really enjoy laughing at true wit in a book. It makes me feel happy.

Dumas plays with history quite a bit and these can't be quite called "historical" in a true s
...more
Luana
Avete mai provato quella sensazione intrisa di un misto di felicità e inquietudine nell’andare incontro ad amici che non vedete da tanto tempo? Felicità per il ritrovamento, inquietudine per la possibilità di trovare qualcosa di sbagliato, o anche più di qualcosa.
E’ con questo spirito che mi sono decisa a leggere ‘Vent’anni dopo’ a distanza di nove mesi dal primo capitolo della rocambolesca saga dedicata ai noti moschettieri. Ero ansiosa di riaprire le pagine di carta a loro dedicate, quasi che
...more
Sarah
I liked The Three Musketeers better, but this was no disappointment; I adore the characters. My only real frustration was that it took so long to get the four of them together.

I kept getting my princes mixed up, and then Condi, Conte and Gondy, and it doesn't help that I read Queen Margot earlier this year and the books have characters with the same family names. But name confusion on the reader's behalf is standard for Dumas, at least for me.

One of my favorite quotes was d'Artagnan's descriptio
...more
Ensiform
An excellent, entertaining, engrossing epic, a series of elegantly arranged adventures and intrigues that really drew me in. It was a rollicking good story, and the characters were brought to life with skill. At first, the situation in the book is a shock: striking down the cherished tradition of "all for one and one for all" in one of the world's great classics, the Musketeers are estranged and apart, and actually on different sides in the Cardinalist-Frondist conflict! But this unfortunate tur ...more
Caitlin K
This book was just as good as the sequel....I am serious! I didnt think it would be as good as the first one, because the three musketeers was seriously amazing, but this book was just as good!! (possibly better??) So just to give you a heads up, my favorite character Comte de la Fere (Athos) did NOT die. Thank gorfo. But somebody else did....so scroll down to read it. remember-its a SPOILER!!!





























Dear Charles I,
It is very unfortunate that you had to die. It's not like anybody elected you to be king
...more
Erika L. Miller
This is a wonderful story and only does justice to the original Three Musketeers story. This book is just not a sequel to the story but an excellent continuation of the story. The characters have changed and yet they have remained the same. d'Artangan is still the confident Gascon who has an idea and ambition for everything, Athos is still the loyal, nobel and honest cornerstone of the group, Aramis the loveable playboy who finds himself at odds with his ambitions of the past and desires for the ...more
Judy
Book 2 of the D'Artagnan Romances

The Musketeers re-unite to fight Milady's son, Mordaunt. The book is chock full of the same humor that made The Three Musketeers a classic. As usual, Dumas tweaks history to fit his novel's needs, but even so, I'm an even more confirmed Dumas-o-phile. I'm looking forward to reading Vicomte de Bragelonne next year.
John
If he's not the greatest writer that ever lived, he's in the top five. I've read 3 of his books in the past year and all 3, The Three Musketeers, The Count of Monte Cristo and now, Twenty Years After, are 3 of my favorite of all time (The Count is in my top 3, if not the top). Twenty Years After takes place 20 years after the end of The Three Musketeers. Our 4 heroes are a bit older, but just as heroic, faithful and downright fun to follow!!! Pick this up and I guarantee you won't put it down qu ...more
Zohar - ManOfLaBook.com
Twenty Years After by Alexan­dre Dumas is the sec­ond book in what is now knows as the d’Artagnan Romances (the first being The Three Mus­ke­teers and the third being The Vicomte de Bragelonne). As in the pre­vi­ous book, the novel was seri­al­ized in 1845 before being pub­lished in book format.

The novel’s plot is com­pli­cated and would take more than a few lines to sum up. The son of “Milady”, the two-faced Mazarin smug­gle the young king and his mother from Paris which is becom­ing hos­tile t
...more
Misfit
It's been twenty years since the close of The Three Musketeers, and only D'Artagnan remains in service to the French Crown. Richelieu is dead and his protege Mazarin now holds the power behind the throne. Anne of Austria rules as regent for her young son, and civil war threatens France.

D'Artagnan is sent to bring the Musketeers out of retirement, but they find themselves at odds between the two sides in the civil unrest. D'Artagnan wants to be promoted to captain and Porthos who wants to be a b
...more
Old-Barbarossa
Great sequel to The Three Musketeers. All older, but not necessarily wiser.
More complex plot.
A civil war in Britain and one simmering in France; vengance; betrayal; mixed loyalties; horses ridden to death in the chase. And these gents drink...lost count of the number of bottles of wine that are consumed. They don't like the ale in England much though. But this thirst for fine wine proves to be a boon later in the story.
Who is the mendicant friar that D'Artagnan recognises? Is Mordaunt Athos' son
...more
Sam
Just as good as the original but in it's own way this book sees us rejoin with D'Artagnan, Portos, Athos and Aramis two decades after the Three Musketeers at a time of civil unrest, disobedience and war. We follow the four friends as they travel their seperate paths to England and the attempt by a brewer's son to de-throne Charles I bringing them face to face with their past in the form of Mordaunt, the son of Milady, bent of revenge for what he sees as his mother's murder. Although the four fri ...more
Blanka
this book was definitely a good read, but there were a lot of things about it that i didn't like as much as the three musketeers. for example, the fact that the four became separated because of all the political technicalities and all the depressing affairs of Charles I. :/ this book got way more political than the three musketeers did and it was kind of a chore to read it if you will. anyway... i still recommend it if one is familiar with the characters and their background because just to be a ...more
Natasha
Oh yes, I really enjoyed reading this. I read "The Three Musketeers" some years ago and it felt like coming back. It didn't matter at all that the characters were twenty years older. They were still very much the same, except maybe Aramis, whom I liked even better in this volume. I love the way the freindship between the four men is portrayed. From today's point of view one would even say there might be more than friendship between them, but of course male friendship was seen in a different way ...more
GoldGato
Dumas was the master of truly getting the reader so involved in the narrative, that we forget we are long past the age of swordplay. As the second volume in the Musketeer collection, Dumas brings us back together with the main characters while focusing on La Fronde, the French Civil War that raged as Louis XIV was coming of age. Athos, Porthos, and Aramis return, along with D'Artagnan of course, and we also see where Dumas is going with the future, as Raoul is introduced.

While the original Thre
...more
Fanda Kutubuku
This is the sequel of The Three Musketeers, depicted the four musketeers after twenty years of separation. Only d'Artagnan who was still serving the Kingdom (now ruled by Anne of Austria--because King Louis XIV was still a boy, together with Cardinal Mazarin). Athos and Porthos have live quietly in their chateau, while Aramis served the Church as an abbe.

Dumas plotting them all to have a bittersweet reunion, this time they were at two opposite sides, and must went through disputes and trusting c
...more
William P.
I love Dumas. I admit it. The D'Artagnan Romances are often silly, but they're a lot of fun. I can see why this, the sequel to The Three Musketeers, is often overlooked in favor of the first book and Iron Mask, but it deserves a read anyhow. It is a true sequel and has some really wonderful stuff in it. I admit to being a sucker for working fictional characters into (more or less) real historical events the way Dumas did. It makes the whole thing seem fantastical and amazing, and yet most of the ...more
Sibylle
I think 20 Years After is one of the few times I liked the sequel better than the original. The Musketeers are much older now; most of them aren't even Musketeers anymore. But once again, they are called to duty. How will they react? Will they come together once more?

I loved seeing how Dumas envisioned the aging Musketeers and their views on their duty. They are no longer young and idealistic. There's a lot of realism in the book. I really, really loved it.
Stefania T.

Dumas non delude mai le aspettative (pur se queste sono ormai alle stelle che più stelle non si può).
Divertissement allo stato puro, da accettare per ciò che ha la pretesa di essere: una fuga dalla realtà, all'insegna del divertimento e dell'avventura.
Regina Andreassen

I am super fan of The Three Musketeers and I have both The Three Musketeers and Twenty Years After indeluxe, vintage editions and I pride myself of it (I have the right, yeah? ;) ); yet, to me, Twenty Years After is better! I highly recommend it!
Jeff Collett
I wonder if Dumas has written something I won't like. Here is one of my favorite lines from this one.

"I would follow him to hell, and that is saying not a little, as I believe him entirely capable of the descent."
Mickey
While this book was not as good as Three Musketeers, it was still great. I really don't understand why it takes so much shit.
Gabriel C.
Well, it's not as good as the first one. When you canonize these guys and make them impossible to beat, it takes a lot of the fun out of the adventure. I also think this really wants to be read back to back with the first one because it takes a lot of fun out it, too, when you don't remember who is whom.

I like very much the different petty bitternesses but the way the book seems to have made up its mind that the aristocracy is pretty awesome after all is quite a shitty pill to swallow after the
...more
Kerstin Olcott
The second book in the Three Muskateers series. The fearsome four find eachother after twenty years apart and rejoin their conquest for adventure and gentlemanly duty.

D’Artagnan has a much more defined role in this story. His Gascon sense of humor and bravery combine with a more mature mind and strong wit, pushing him into the role of de facto leader of the group. It changes the dynamics of the band of muskateers and makes d’Artangnan a more interesting character than he was in the first book.

I
...more
Erica
Well, I didn’t like it as well as The Three Musketeers, but then again, just as Dumas defined a genre or romantic, swashbuckling adventure with TTM, perhaps with this story he defined its sequel. All the romanticism and adventure continues, and our four heroes are much more mature, and more deeply defined, than before, but the villains just aren’t as interesting—really, how can you top Milady? Her son is just as psychotic, but he only shows up for maybe half of the book and is merely a caricatur ...more
Ilze Folkmane
"Twenty Years After" indeed is, as the back of my copy of the book says, 'a sequel worthy in every respect of the original'. It is well written, humorous, entertaining and sincere, but the thing that made me give it 4 stars instead of 5 probably were the twenty years that had passed. I miss the musketeers being young, arrogant and together in absolutely everything.
I liked how in the first book d'Artagnan was 'at the age of foolish hopes'. However, the twenty years that he spent without his frien
...more
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Editors? 2 7 Sep 21, 2014 07:44PM  
Best English translation? 4 48 Jul 06, 2014 10:50AM  
Mordaunt vs The Count 3 27 Aug 16, 2008 08:28AM  
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4785
This note regards Alexandre Dumas, père, the father of Alexandre Dumas, fils (son). For the son, see Alexandre Dumas.

Alexandre Dumas, père (French for "father", akin to Senior in English), born Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie, was a French writer, best known for his numerous historical novels of high adventure which have made him one of the most widely read French authors in the world. Many of his no
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More about Alexandre Dumas...

Other Books in the Series

The D'Artagnan Romances (8 books)
  • The Three Musketeers
  • Los tres mosqueteros, 1 (Las novelas de D'Artagnan, #1.1)
  • Los tres mosqueteros, 2
  • Vicomte de Bragelonne (The D'Artagnan Romances, #3.1)
  • Ten Years Later
  • Louise de La Vallière (The D'Artagnan Romances, #3.2)
  • The Man in the Iron Mask (The D'Artagnan Romances, #3)
The Count of Monte Cristo The Three Musketeers The Man in the Iron Mask (The D'Artagnan Romances, #3) Robin Hood The Black Tulip

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“Friendship throws out deep roots in honest hearts, D'Artagnan. Believe me, it is only the evil-minded who deny friendship; they cannot understand it.” 11 likes
“Now an enemy is never so near and consequently so threatening, as when he has completely disappeared.” 10 likes
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