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The Well of Stars (Marrow #2)

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3.72 of 5 stars 3.72  ·  rating details  ·  348 ratings  ·  29 reviews
In The Well of Stars, Hugo award-nominated author Robert Reed has written a stunning sequel to his acclaimed novel Marrow. The Great Ship, so vast that it contains within its depths a planet that lay undiscovered for generations, has cruised through the universe for untold billions of years. After a disastrous exploration of the planet, Marrow, the Ship's captains face an ...more
Paperback, 448 pages
Published February 6th 2007 by Tor Science Fiction (first published 2004)
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(showing 1-30 of 696)
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Derek
As I read this book, I realized that the closest comparison I could make was to Doc Smith. There's the same epic sense of scale, both in the events that occur and in the sheer size, distance, and lengths of time involved, and also the same steely resolve of the characters as they manufacture superweapons and battle in some awesome, over-the-top war against completely bizarre invaders.

Strangely, the most interesting characters are not the transhuman Captains, those hundred-millenia-old superhuma
...more
Kersplebedeb
Brilliant, absolutely brilliant for the first half. Second half a bit less so, and the ending was utterly "out of nowhere" and anticlimactic (i.e. if this was a tv show, it would end with a "to be continued next week"... only it's been a few years since this book came out and no news of when to expect the sequel.)

Reed's story takes place on The Great Ship, a giant artifact (big as Jupiter, and hollowed out) that may date from the beginning of the universe, and which humans colonized and turned i
...more
Josiah
Have you ever read a book and been so in love with the setting that you wish you could spend more time there and didn't care about characters or plot or anything else? After finishing Marrow, I was somewhat underwhelmed by the actual story, but was quite in love with the planet sized spaceship and its passengers. I considered myself acutely lucky, then, to have run across this book, which I didn't even know existed, while reading its predecessor. I was able to set down the one and begin immediat ...more
David Windsor
Sep 07, 2011 David Windsor rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: apat
Well of stars boasts hands down the single coolest weapon I've ever read about in any work of fiction to date. A chain of superconducting magnets, each holding in its field a singularity, spun up around a central gravity at relativistic speeds, and positioned in the path of on comming planets so that they can be split in half and their energetic cores consumed for energy and materials.

It stokes the fire of my science fiction love for all things VERY big.
Nicolas
Ce roman est la suite de le grand vaisseau. Et si dans le premier tome le big dumb object était le vaisseau lui-même, il s'agit cette fois-ci d'une nébuleuse ... Et je ne vois pas comment on peut faire plus énorme comme objet bizarre.
Il y a donc des trous noirs par milliers, des créatures encore plus étranges que dans les tomes précédents, des humains quasi-immortels aux pouvoirs quasi-divins, et tant d'autres choses superlatives.
Je trouve étonnant que chacun des tomes de cette histoire arrive à
...more
Bruce
While Reed can have a slightly annoying style, I've always enjoyed his work. This is another good one, full of interactions and battles on a pleasantly cosmological scale.

I enjoy his work much more than currently popular authors Alistair Reynolds and Ken McLeod, whose work I cannot tolerate.

Not a perfect book, but enjoyable. NB: sequel to Marrow. Stands mostly on its own, and leaves room for more...
Nemo
A very good hard sf space opera somewhat reminiscent of true modern classics of the genre, like Vernor Vinge's A Fire Upon the Deep. I enjoyed it greatly, especially for its truly gargantuan scope and inventiveness, it truly lives up to Clarke's law about sufficiently advanced technology.
Ed Tinkertoy
This book is the followup book to Reed's book "Marrow". I did not like this one any better than Marrow. It's pure fantasy, not science fiction. I did not really read all of the book. After about 30% of it on my Kindle I skimmed it the remainder of the way to the end, reading a paragraph or two or a chapter here and there. I was trying to see if anything peaked my interest enough to read it more closely. Then I read the last two chapters to see how the story ended. The ending, in my opinion, was ...more
Rachel
Made it to page 53. See previous updates. Better luck next time? DNF.
Roddy Williams
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Lord Humungus
I read Robert Reed mostly for his ideas and concepts, not because of his superior storytelling or character development. This sequel to Marrow didn't even have the novelty of introducing the Great Ship and Marrow itself, something both the novella and book used to keep the reader engaged. Here, high concept physics is flying all over the place, which though certainly inventive, doesn't serve as a hook to keep you turning the page (except to get through it faster). The characters are paper thin, ...more
Niall519
Interesting one. I hadn't realised it was a sequel prior to page 1, and continued not o realise that for some time. So it can be read without having read Marrow first, although I'm sure it would improve if one did have the backstory. I also suspect there's a third to come, based on the ending.

It scores points for really, really big objects in space; exploration and contact themes; and a fair number of interesting ideas and technologies. Like some other reviewers, I think the characters are a bit
...more
Sara
The writing is dense and easy to get lost in (which can be a good or bad thing, depending on your perspective). A handful of times I passed through an adjective so awkward it took me out of the book thinking "ugh, really? *That's* the best word he could think of here?" But I'm forever harping that modern fiction has lost sight of the importance of plot, and this book has quite the story arc, so it gets bonus points for remembering to tell a good tale.
Kenneth
From the beginning I was a bit lost with this book, most likely due to lacking read the first book Marrow by Robert Reed. The book itself once I finally forced my way through, was very well written and included an interesting concept of humanity and life that was refreshing. I will re-read the book later this year once I pick up it's predecessor, hopefully with the second read though I'll understand more behind the story-line and be able to grasp some of the underlying intents Robert included, a ...more
Pzikmanis
This is way future Sci Fi with an incredibly grand time scale. This is the sequel to Marrow. Just as good as the first book. And it appears to be the final book, but there is a possibility for more...
Daragh
Not quite as successful as it's predecessor and I agree, the characterization loses out a little to the plot, but it is a good read, but suffers from an abrupt anti-climactic ending, which is clearly the path to a second sequel. Hopefully it will be the Vortex to the predecessor's Axis (a reference to Robert Charles Wilson's series of books - Spin, Axis and Vortex - the middle book being the weakest).
Reed certainly seems to know his science and it is satisfying enough, it takes the foreground a
...more
Norman Howe
You wouldn't think "Pulse-pounding suspense" and "generation spaceship" would go together in the same review"," but they do.
Ben Cops
I'm really writing this because the every other review on Amazon states that this is disappointing, or loses its way half way through. I couldn't disagree more. Where Marrow looks in, The Well of Stars looks out and delivers a constantly exciting, well written, technically involving and deeply sinister tale of... (well I don't believe in reading the back cover before the book so won't go any further).

If you enjoyed Marrow, please please give this a go. I've read some cracking scifi in 2010 and
...more
Richard Wood
Good sequel; original ideas
Andrew
Actually enjoyed this more than Marrow. Was interesting to see more of the universe outside the ship.
Krait
Mar 10, 2010 Krait marked it as to-read
Shelves: science-fiction
I'm going to shelve this one until I (possibly) read Marrow. The plot seems rather disconnected, with perspectives jumping about all over place and time. For me, to be in only 150 pages after 4 days does not bode well for a completed reading...
Rod Hyatt
I thought that the great ship as a place was fantastic. But the story didn't help me feel, smell or taste anything. For all the never ending explanation from the author, it just didn't draw me in. It kept me reading till I finished it but I never take this long to get through. Its not the story or the characters, its the writing.
Jason Sanford
A good read, with lots of action and moments of philosophical insight which resonate with the reader. Lovers of Reed's Great Ship will enjoy this novel. My only complaint is that too many new loose threads appeared at the end of the novel, almost as if this was supposed to be the second book in a trilogy instead of a stand-alone novel.
mister
the story goes on!! the scale of things in this book are truly staggering. life-spans, distances, the ship Marrow itself. lot's a fun!
Kristi Thompson
Good read (less engaging than Marrow)... but not an ending. Needs and lacks a sequel.
Dmadden
Mar 03, 2010 Dmadden is currently reading it
I'm breathlessly waiting to see where he will go from "Marrow". Stay tuned.
Bill
I hate to give up on a book, though I found it rather plodding.
Chris
Good sequel. I hope there's another!
Joel
Dec 06, 2007 Joel rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Hard Core Sci-Fi readers
Shelves: sci-fi, favorites
Good Sequel to an original (Marrow)
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