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The Top 100 Young Adult Books of All Time
Posted by Jade on September 10, 2015

It's September and to get you in the book-loving, back-to-school mood, we've gone through thousands of Young Adult books to come up with this list of the Top 100 YA Books of all time.

These aren't books that your teachers told you to read. (Though there are a few of those in here, too!) No, this list is the Top 100 YA Books as determined by you, the Goodreads members who truly love YA literature. And it's not just a popularity contest. Every single one of these books also has a rating of 4.0 or above, so whether you're a dystopia die-hard who re-reads The Hunger Games every year or a lover of contemporary tales like The Fault in their Stars, take a look at the Top 100 YA Books to be reminded of old favorites and to discover great new recommendations.

How many have you read? Take a look at the list on Listopia.


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Let us know how many you've read!


28 Books That Got You Hooked on a New Genre
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on September 10, 2015

This week we asked on Facebook and Twitter: What book got you hooked on a new genre? Maybe you never liked Fantasy until you started reading A Game of Thrones, or you were a skeptic about YA until Rainbow Rowell stole your heart. Today we've got the top picks! How many hooked you?

MYSTERY AND THRILLER
Very Good Lives
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Our Souls at Night
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FANTASY
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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HISTORICAL FICTION
Very Good Lives
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SCIENCE FICTION
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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YOUNG ADULT
Very Good Lives
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Our Souls at Night
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ROMANCE
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The Cartel
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The Familiar

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HORROR
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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What book got you hooked on your favorite genre?
What We're Reading at Goodreads This Month
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on September 04, 2015

Terry Pratchett once wrote, "If you have enough book space, I don't want to talk to you." Well, here at the Goodreads office, we can never have enough books—or enough book space! Every other month is Book Perk day at Goodreads; each member of the team gets to order a new book for our ever-expanding library. Check out our latest stash!



You can find the full list of titles on Listopia. What will you be reading next?
U.K. & Ireland: Goodreads on Kindle E-Readers and Fire Tablets Now Available!
Posted by Suzanne on September 01, 2015


Good news for our members in the U.K. and Ireland! Your wish has come true. In the coming weeks, Goodreads will be on your Kindle e-readers and Fire tablets!

Just read an amazing quote and want to tell your friends about it? Now you can highlight and share quotes with your Goodreads friends from inside the book. Finished a book and don't know what to read next? Check your Want to Read shelves to see what's captured your attention already or get inspired with personalized book recommendations from Goodreads.

You can access and update Goodreads on all generations of Kindle Paperwhite, as well as Kindle Voyage and the latest generation Kindle. The update will also be available for Amazon's complete range of current-generation tablets, Fire HD 6, Fire HD 7, and Fire HDX 8.9, as well as previous-generation models Fire HD, Kindle Fire HDX 7, and Kindle Fire HDX 8.9.

In addition to sharing favorite passages, seeing your Want to Read shelves, and personal book recommendations, we've included several of our members' favorite features, including:
  • Track what you want to read, have read, and are currently reading,
  • Rate books after you've read them,
  • Keep up with what your friends are reading in your Updates feed and on their profiles, and
  • Add the books you've purchased on Amazon to your Goodreads shelves.

Let's take a tour.


See what your friends are reading

Read reviews from your friends and the Goodreads community

Easily update your Goodreads shelves—mark a book as Currently Reading and rate it when you finish

This news is the latest in a series of updates we have rolled out for our U.K. and Irish members, including these three features on our website:

  • Preview a book on Goodreads—Want to find out more about a book before you add it to your Want to Read shelf or decide to buy it? Click on the "Preview" icon on a book page to read a sample. Preview is available on any of the millions of titles that have a Kindle edition.
  • Listen to a book on Goodreads—Listen to a sample of an audiobook within your browser to help choose your next audiobook. Click on the "Listen" icon on a book page and the audio sample will start to play. You can listen, pause, and resume the sample. Listen is available for any of the 180,000 books that have an Audible audiobook edition. This is currently only available on the Goodreads.com website on your computer or laptop.
  • Add Your Amazon Books on Goodreads—Easily keep track of the books you have read, are currently reading, and want to read by adding books purchased on Amazon—both print and Kindle—to your Goodreads shelves. You can rate and shelve each book individually. We give you full control over which books to add so you avoid adding any book you bought as a gift. (Or any book you'd rather keep private!)

In the U.K. and Ireland, Goodreads will roll out to Kindle e-readers and Fire tablets in a free, over-the-air update delivered automatically in the coming weeks to all generations of Kindle Paperwhite, as well as Kindle Voyage and the latest generation Kindle. The update will also be available for Amazon's complete range of current-generation tablets, Fire HD 6, Fire HD 7, and Fire HDX 8.9, as well as previous-generation models Fire HD, Kindle Fire HDX 7, and Kindle Fire HDX 8.9. On e-readers, the personalized recommendations feature will be available on the latest generation Kindle, Kindle Paperwhite (6th and 7th generations), and Kindle Voyage.

How will you know you have Goodreads on your device? For Kindle e-readers, you'll see our friendly "g" on the right of the top navigation bar:



For Fire tablets, from the Home screen, tap on Apps and you'll find the Goodreads icon there. Simply tap on these icons and follow the instructions to link your Goodreads account to your device.




Wondering when your country or device will get this? Goodreads is currently available on Kindle e-readers and Fire tablets in the U.S., Canada, Australia, and now the U.K. and Ireland. We don't have details to share about other devices or about introducing Goodreads to Kindle e-readers or Fire tablets in other countries at this time, but our goal is to provide the Goodreads experience on Kindle e-readers and Fire tablets to as many of our members as possible. In the meantime, other options to consider are our iPhone/iPad app or our Android app, available from the Amazon Appstore for Android or from Google Play.

Let us know what you think!
Want to See Your Favorite Book Quote on the Goodreads App?
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on September 01, 2015



Every time you open our iOS and Android apps we show you an inspiring or thought-provoking book quote. Our members say that it's one of their favorite things about the app! The Goodreads engineering team is ready to update our list of quotes, and we'd love to hear your ideas—please share your favorite quote, or a link to the quote on Goodreads, in the comments below.

If you haven't downloaded the Goodreads app yet, you're missing out! It's the perfect solution to all of your book-lover dilemmas. Not sure what to look for when you're in a bookstore or library? Pull out your phone and check your Goodreads Want to Read shelves! Out with a friend who gives you a brilliant book recommendation or inspired by an author interview on the radio? Add books to your Want to Read shelf even when you're on the go!

For iPhone and iPad owners, you can download the app here.

For Android phone and tablet owners, you can download the app here.

Don't forget to give us your book quote suggestions in the comments below. We'll pick the best and add them to our apps.
16 Books You Wish You Actually Paid Attention to in School
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 29, 2015

Assigned reading can be annoying, but you know what else is? Becoming a grown-up whose responsibilities don't include reading. If you missed out on a classic the first time around, try it now—just think how proud your former English teachers will be!

This week we asked on Facebook and on Twitter: What assigned reading book do you wish you had paid more attention to in school? Check out the top answers below.

Very Good Lives
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Our Souls at Night
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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The Cartel
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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Which book did you sleep through in English class? Did you ever try and read it later?
Plotters vs. Pantsers: Can You Guess Which Side Stephen King and J.K. Rowling Are On?
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 26, 2015

Since the dawn of storytelling, there have always been two types of storytellers: the Plotters and the Pantsers. (If you're wondering, yes, Pantsers predate the existence of pants.) Never heard the terms before? It's simple. Plotters outline and plan the structure of their entire story, while Pantsers prefer to write by the seat of their pants.

To further understand the ancient Plotter/Pantser divide, we've taken a look at how six contemporary authors write their books. Which method of story crafting do you like best?

The Plotters
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JOHN GRISHAM
"I don't start a novel until I have lived with the story for awhile to the point of actually writing an outline and after a number of books I've learned that the more time I spend on the outline the easier the book is to write. And if I cheat on the outline I get in trouble with the book."


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R.L. STEIN
"If you do enough planning before you start to write, there's no way you can have writer's block. I do a complete chapter by chapter outline."


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J.K. ROWLING
"I always have a basic plot outline, but I like to leave some things to be decided while I write." (While this may sound like Rowling's verging on pantser territory, take a look at her "basic plot outline.")



The Pantsers
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MARGARET ATWOOD
"When I'm writing a novel, what comes first is an image, scene, or voice. Something fairly small. Sometimes that seed is contained in a poem I've already written. The structure or design gets worked out in the course of the writing. I couldn't write the other way round, with structure first. It would be too much like paint-by-numbers."


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PIERCE BROWN
"Some writers are plotters… I, on the other hand, have the curse and rabid delight of being a pantser. I sit down at my computer every day praying for a lightning strike. Common symptoms include pacing, an abnormally clean house, frantic cups of joe, and middle-of-the-night writing breakdowns."


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STEPHEN KING
"Outlines are the last resource of bad fiction writers who wish to God they were writing masters' theses."



Can you tell the difference between a plotted and a pantsed book? Which do you prefer?

15 of Your Biggest Book Pet Peeves
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 22, 2015



Last week we asked on Facebook and on Twitter: What's your biggest book pet peeve?* Check out the top answers below!


1. "Peeps who leave crumbs behind between pages!! #ew" (Joyce B)

2. "When publishers change book covers mid-series! Biggest book pet peeve EVER…"(Amanda White)

3. "My Kindle battery dying!" (Hannah DesWonn)

4. "Seeing someone turn a book inside out by folding it in half while they read. The front and back should never meet!" (Mopsy Prewett)

5. "People who forget that they borrowed a book from you." (Nadia Malik)

6. "When someone rips out the pages of a book. How is the book supposed to make any sense when there are missing pages in it?" (Trish Welsh)

7. "Those strange mystery stains that are usually found between the pages of library books. Did someone spill coffee? Or slash their fingers open with a paper cut? Who knows?" (Traci Mccarty)

8. "Highlighting! Who are these savages?" (Anna Moloney)

9. "Library books last read by a nose picker." (Grace Minnick Hickox)

10. "Paperback covers that delaminate and warped hardcovers." (Paul Wichert)

11. "Dropping books in the toilet. Not that it's ever happened to me…" (Devyn Price)

12. "Broken spines are okay, unless it's a SINGLE crack right in the middle of the spine. That's the WORST." (Charlie)

13. "Dog-eared pages drive me crazy." (Elizabeth Newby)

14. "Sand stuck between pages from reading on the beach." (Ellen)

15. "Movie edition book covers…shudder." (Hollie Ruthless)


Did your book pet peeve not make the list? Then share it with us in the comments!

*And for those of you who have zero pet peeves, maybe Chhandra Bewtra can speak for you: "None. A book is precious, even with disfigurements."


20 Favorite Last Lines from Books
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 18, 2015

Parting is such sweet sorrow, especially when it comes to saying goodbye to a good book. Last week we asked on Facebook and on Twitter: What's your favorite last line? Today we've got the top answers. Did yours make the list?

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"I am haunted by waters."
A River Runs Through It
by Norman Maclean


"It is not often that someone comes along who is a true friend and a good writer. Charlotte was both."
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Charlotte's Web
by E.B. White



"'Well, I'm back,' he said."
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The Return of the King
by J.R.R. Tolkien



"Isn't it pretty to think so?'"
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The Sun Also Rises
by Ernest Hemingway



"All was well."
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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
by J.K. Rowling



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"But there are much worse games to play."
Mockingjay
by Suzanne Collins


"The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed."
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The Gunslinger
by Stephen King


"It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known."
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A Tale of Two Cities
by Charles Dickens



"All their life in this world and all their adventures had only been the cover and the title page: now at last they were beginning Chapter One of the Great Story which no one on earth has read: which goes on for ever: in which every chapter is better than the one before."
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The Last Battle
by C.S. Lewis



"Are there any questions?"
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The Handmaid's Tale
by Margaret Atwood



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"Don't ever tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everybody."
The Catcher in the Rye
by J.D. Salinger


"The old man was dreaming about the lions."
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The Old Man and the Sea
by Ernest Hemingway



"Tomorrow is another day."
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Gone with the Wind
by Margaret Mitchell



"One bird said to Billy Pilgrim, 'Poo-tee-weet?'"
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Slaughterhouse-Five
by Kurt Vonnegut



"He would be there all night, and he would be there when Jem waked up in the morning."
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To Kill a Mockingbird
by Harper Lee



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"When I stepped out into the bright sunlight from the darkness of the movie house, I had only two of things in my mind: Paul Newman and a ride home..."
The Outsiders
by S.E. Hinton


"Oh, my girls, however long you may live, I never can wish you a greater happiness than this. "
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Little Women
by Louisa May Alcott



"He loved Big Brother."
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Nineteen Eighty-Four
by George Orwell



"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."
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The Great Gatsby
by F. Scott Fitzgerald



"I am haunted by humans."
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The Book Thief
by Markus Zusak




Don't see your favorite last line? Then share it with us in the comments!
7 Little Known Facts About William Goldman's The Princess Bride
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 13, 2015



Happy birthday, William Goldman! The award-winning American novelist, playwright, and screenwriter turned 84 this week. To help celebrate his narrative genius, we've gathered a few surprising facts about his beloved fantasy classic, The Princess Bride.



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1. Goldman's daughters gave him the title for the book.
Before Goldman began writing The Princess Bride, he told his two young daughters, "I'll write you a story. What do you want it to be about?" One said "a princess" and the other said "a bride."

2. The Princess Bride is as an abridged version of a book that does not exist.
Or at least that's what Goldman would like you to think. He presented his book as an abridged version of the "original" (i.e. fictional) Princess Bride, written by S. Morgenstern (a fictional person). The literary device let Goldman gleefully write only the "good parts" of his own story.

3. Goldman experienced an embarrassing moment of panic on the set of the film adaptation.
Because he wrote the book and the screenplay for The Princess Bride, you might think Goldman would know what to expect on set. You would be very wrong. On the first day of filming, he ruined the first few takes with a barely audible prayer chant. And then, during the scripted scene when Buttercup's dress catches on fire, Goldman panicked and screamed, "Oh my god! Her dress is on fire!"

4. The countries are named after old coins.
The Florin, where Prince Humperdinck reigns, is the name of an Italian gold coin once minted in Florence; and Guilder, the neighboring country Humperdinck was (spoiler alert?) going to murder Buttercup to start a war with, is the name of a Dutch gold coin.

5. If Princess Bride ever got a sequel, it would be called Buttercup's Baby and Stephen King would write it.
Goldman included this juicy tidbit in later editions of The Princess Bride. Unfortunately, King shot it down as a silly joke between friends on his website—but we're not so easily fooled. (Plus, we just really, really want to know what a Princess Bride tale as written by King would look like.)

6. Goldman was able to look back at the book "without humiliation."
"I [don't] like my writing," Goldman said. "I wrote a movie called Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and I wrote a novel called The Princess Bride and those are the only two things I've ever written, not that I'm proud of, but that I can look at without humiliation."

7. You can request a missing scene from The Princess Bride.
…You just won't receive it. Instead, you'll get a delightfully nutty automated response from Goldman, detailing the fictitious legal troubles surrounding the missing scene. (A Florinese lawyer named Kermit Shog is involved—you know you want this in your inbox.) "Request" your own missing scene here!




Have you read The Princess Bride? Watched the movie? Tell us what you think of Goldman's tale in the comments!