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Khaled Hosseini on A Thousand Splendid Suns' Theatrical Debut
Posted by Cybil on February 15, 2017




It's been ten years since the publication of Khaled Hosseini's bestselling novel A Thousand Splendid Suns. This month, the novel about three generations of Afghan women living in the war-torn Kabul is being adapted into a stage play, premiering at the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco.

A review of the play in The San Francisco Chronicle said of the production, "So often in our stories, be they fairy tales or kitchen sink dramas or founding myths, heroism, which is male, is possible only through a sacrifice, which is female and promptly forgotten. In this play, to be a hero is to love; in a world of hate and fear—in any world—there is no more courageous act."

We asked Hosseini, who also wrote The Kite Runner, to tell us what it was like to see his novel come to the stage:


"The idea of adapting A Thousand Splendid Suns for the stage holds great appeal for me. Both as a fan of theater, as someone who appreciates the immense communal joy of this ancient art form, but also as the book's author, one of the first things I made clear to Carey Perloff and Ursula Rani Sarma—the artistic director and the playwright, respectively—was that I wished for this production to be their vision. I wanted to grant them the creative license to explore the story rather than feel constricted by it, the freedom to tell it as it lived in their minds when they first read it.

To me, the point never was to have them prop up Mariam and Laila intact from the novel on the stage but to let the audience experience the story anew through this other portal, to hear what it said to someone other than its original creator.

And then there is the unexpected timeliness of a theatrical adaptation of A Thousand Splendid Suns. It's a tale being retold at a time when we are engaged as a nation in a sometimes contentious debate about the plight of refugees and, among other things, the very nature of our relationship with the Middle East and its people.

It strikes me as a good time to be reminded that whether we worship in a church or a temple or a mosque, or nowhere at all, there are core elements that make up the human experience, things we all share as creatures on this planet that far outweigh our differences. Storytelling reminds us of this easily forgotten fact. And it is all too easy to forget that Laila, Mariam, Aziza, Tariq, and Zalmai might as well be the countless individuals who, at this very moment, are fleeing extremism and violence, the desperate souls crossing the Mediterranean, and other borders and frontiers, risking life and limb, searching for a measure of safety, peace, and dignity.

Political rhetoric has a way of trampling all over human beings as individuals, people with faces. It falls to the artist to shine a light on these faces instead. I hope this play accomplishes that."

Discover more of Khaled Hosseini's works and add them to your Want to Read shelf.

A Thousand Splendid Suns
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The Kite Runner
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nd the Mountains Echoed
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What has Hosseini's writing meant to you? Share your thoughts in the comments.

And check out more recent blogs:
What's New This Week: 7 Great Books Hitting the Shelves
George Saunders on Lincoln, the Afterlife, and Writing a Novel
Sophie Kinsella Talks About Our Social Media Obsessions
What's New This Week: 7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on February 14, 2017

Need another excuse to go to the bookstore this week? We've got seven! Bulk up your Want to Read shelf with these brand-new standalone titles.


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Lincoln in the Bardo
by George Saunders

You should read this book if you like: Literary fiction, Abraham Lincoln, ghosts and graveyards, "the deeper meaning and possibilities of life"



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We Are Okay
by Nina LaCour

You should read this book if you like: YA contemporary fiction, runaways, secret tragedies, powerful female friendship, forgiveness


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Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History
by Bill Schutt

You should read this book if you like: Nonfiction, weird history, anthropology, burial rites, eating people (just kidding?)



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Miranda and Caliban
by Jacqueline Carey

You should read this book if you like: Fantasy retellings, Shakespeare's The Tempest, revenge, twisted love, magic and monsters



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All That's Left to Tell
by Daniel Lowe

You should read this book if you like: Mystery, buzzy debuts, Room, poignant father-daughter relationships, the power of storytelling


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Like a Memory
by Abbi Glines

You should read this book if you like: Contemporary romance, second chances, seaside towns, heartbreak and redemption, boutique clothing stores


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The End of Alchemy: Money, Banking, and the Future of the Global Economy
by Mervyn King

You should read this book if you like: Nonfiction, economics, banking insiders, bold solutions for global problems, durable prosperity, money


BONUS: The wait is over—check out three of the buzziest sequels coming out today!

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The Wish Granter
by C.J. Redwine

The second book in the Ravenspire YA fantasy series
(Start off the series with The Shadow Queen)



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Heartbreak Hotel
by Jonathan Kellerman

The thirty-second installment in Alex Delaware thriller series
(Start off the series with When the Bough Breaks)



The Cad and the Co-Ed
by Penny Reid and L.H. Cowsway

The third book in the Rugby contemporary romance series
(Start off the series with The Hooker and the Hermit)




What are you reading this week? Let's talk books in the comments!


And check out more recent blogs:
George Saunders on Lincoln, the Afterlife, and Writing a Novel
Sophie Kinsella Talks About Our Social Media Obsessions
The Books Victoria Aveyard Recommends for Her Own Heroine

George Saunders on Lincoln, the Afterlife, and Writing a Novel
Posted by Cybil on February 13, 2017



On February 20, 1862, Abraham Lincoln's 11-year-old son, Willie, died. The president, already drained from the ongoing Civil War, was distraught—so much so that, a few days later, he allegedly went into the crypt where his son's body was interred and took it out of its coffin. Comfort, anguish, sorrow—nobody has ever been quite sure why Lincoln did it, or even if he did. The tale may be apocryphal.


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George Saunders couldn't get the story out of his head.

The Tenth of December author and short story master made several false starts at the emotional material before finally settling in to write something unusual for him: a novel. The result, Lincoln in the Bardo, uses a variety of voices—historical accounts, Lincoln acquaintances, cemetery spirits of many eras and backgrounds—to express something both personal and universal about that one night in 1862. The following is an excerpt from our full interview that appeared in our February newsletter.

Goodreads: Why the Buddhist "bardo"? Why not "Lincoln in Purgatory"? Or "Lincoln in Limbo"?

George Saunders: I was raised Catholic, and my understanding of purgatory is, you go there until you kind of work off your sins. The distance you are from God is a form of terrible punishment, and after many, many years of this, you can escape. To me that was a little bit—it's like jail. But the bardo idea, the way I reimagined the bardo, you're there kind of by your own consent, in the sense that as long as you continue to have a deluded or confused idea about who you are, you're going to stay there. So these beings are free to leave at any time if they only have the correct realization about their own nature. All they have to do is recognize that they're dead and recognize that they're temporary, and then they can be freed.


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GR: One of your other works is the short story CivilWarLand in Bad Decline. Do you have a particular fascination with this era?

GS: Something about it is just cool to me. Maybe it's the idea that these mythical events that could be out of Homer happened here—where there's now a Chick-fil-A or a mall parking lot. That's always been interesting to me.

I tend to kind of go where my interest takes me without a whole lot of intellectualization about it. To get a work of fiction done, you have to be so deeply interested in it. If something is only intellectually interesting to me, it tends to not be enough to sustain a whole project. But if it's viscerally interesting—if I can get some good jokes out of it, or if there's a verbal reservoir available to me—then I know I can proceed.

GR: Let's get to reader questions. Several readers—Emily, James Figy, Kayla—want to know the difference between writing short stories and writing a novel.

GS: I really had kind of decided NOT to write a novel. I was very proud of the fact that I was not a novelist and very content with being a short story guy. But this material had been nagging at me for all those years, and once I got started, it wasn't long before I realized it was going to be longer than 50 pages. I was constantly telling the book, "You'd better not bloat up. I want you to stay short. If you can be a story, I want you to be a story because you know that's what works for us." So in a sense the book kind of pushed me around a little bit and said, "No, I insist." I was excited to see it wasn't a whole different world. It was just on a slightly bigger frame.

Read the full interview with Saunders here. Missing out on our newsletters? Be sure to sign up!



And check out more recent blogs:
Sophie Kinsella Talks About Our Social Media Obsessions
The Books Victoria Aveyard Recommends for Her Own Heroine
36 Romantic Book-to-Movie Adaptations
The Best Inspirational Quotes from Books
Sophie Kinsella Talks About Our Social Media Obsessions
Posted by Cybil on February 09, 2017



The first installment of Sophie Kinsella's wildly popular Shopaholic series, Confessions of a Shopaholic, introduces Becky Bloomwood, a financial journalist whose "perfect life" is tenuously supported by crushing credit card debt. The bestselling author has revisited her endearing protagonist over the course of seven more novels.

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In her latest novel, My Not So Perfect Life, Kinsella has a new heroine, Katie Brenner, and examines our present-day obsession with social media and the impulse to project a perfect life through a carefully curated online presence. The following is an excerpt from our full interview that appeared in our February newsletter.

Goodreads: My Not So Perfect Life explores the theme of perception versus reality through the lens of social media. Where did the idea come from?

Sophie Kinsella: I've always written what I see around me. When I started writing Shopaholic, it was because I saw everybody shopping too much, including myself. I've always had radar, whether it's workaholism, whatever the topic is, and I've been fascinated by the explosion of social media.

I think it's brought out a part of us that's always been there. We've always wanted to put our best foot forward and give a good impression. People used to have their portraits painted—this is nothing new, the instinct has always been there. But I think with social media you add a new dimension. You can hide behind it, you can present a front, and it can be that the people you're connected with never see you in person, so these little fictions—which we all indulge in—they never get put straight.

In contrast, we're humans and are built to pick up signals, so you might meet a friend and she starts off saying everything is wonderful, but you pick things up from her expression, or her eyes, or her nervous laugh, and you can get to the truth behind this image. But with social media you don't have that; you just have the image. And it just seems to be the convention that we relentlessly put out information and images, and no one seems to break that convention. So we're stuck in this cycle of "isn't this great?" There's nothing wrong with that, except that it becomes the perception that this is what reality is, and I think if you're feeling insecure, rather than see someone's holiday pictures and think, Well, that's only one side of the story, you can think that's the whole story. It can lower your own self-esteem.

GR: In your latest book, the main character emulates her boss whom she imagines to have the perfect life. Was there anyone you emulated when you were just starting out? Do you ever think about that person now with fresh eyes?

SK: There was nobody in particular I looked at and wanted their whole package, but there were definitely people I would look at—there was an editor on the circuit when I was a journalist, and she was renowned for taking over her magazine at the age of 25. Everybody thought she was amazing, and I got slightly obsessed. How did she do that, and could I be like her? I was nothing like her, which shows how ridiculous it is. And I didn't even really want to be an editor for a financial magazine.

I think it's natural to latch onto people and think, Well, this is my role model, and I'm going to see what they did because you need some sort of guide. Other people I've looked at who have had their children before me, and I've looked at them and thought, What have they done, what decisions have they made? I look at somebody who has been there before me and try to map myself from them. Which can be useful, or it can be really stupid or irrelevant because their life is nothing like my own, and I've learned that. I think I have a natural propensity to compare and contrast. It's such a natural instinct, and can be useful, and can be a red herring.


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GR: I read that you have five children and that there's a 15-year age gap between the youngest and eldest. What differences, if any, have you encountered in raising them? Has technology made it easier or harder? How has parenthood changed from then to now?

SK: I'm far more relaxed! Your first child, you're absolutely paranoid. Every phase you think will last forever—they'll cry forever, you'll breastfeed forever—but you get such perspective after 15 years, and now I'm just so superrelaxed, whatever goes on. They'll all learn to read, they'll all learn to do up their buttons, they'll end up eating vegetables one day. I remember my third in particular, I remembered thinking, "This is fun. I have a baby, and I'm not freaking out."

And obviously the world has changed, and I think I'll have to be more vigilant about technology than I was with the first children because it's just a different matter. I haven't really let them have technology very young. I'm afraid we're the mean parents who wouldn't let them play the computer games or have a phone very early. It's a fascinating topic. I wrote a young adult book called Finding Audrey, and there's a secondary character called Frank, the brother, who's completely addicted to computer games and has an ongoing battle with his mother about it, which is the comic release. And let's just say I've had some family research on that.

Read the full interview with Kinsella here. Missing out on our newsletters? Be sure to sign up!


And check out more recent blogs:
The Books Victoria Aveyard Recommends for Her Own Heroine
Rereading Is Here! Let's Say It Again. Rereading Is Here!
36 Romantic Book-to-Movie Adaptations
The Best Inspirational Quotes from Books
A Rebel's Reading List: The Books Victoria Aveyard Recommends for Her Own Heroine
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on February 07, 2017



Books contain a great deal of power. No one knows this better than Victoria Aveyard, author of the Red Queen series which brings superhero-like abilities into a YA fantasy world. As King's Cage, the third entry in the series, hits bookshelves, Goodreads asked Aveyard to share the books that would help her beleaguered heroine, Mare, rise up against her tormentors.


When Glass Sword ended, Mare was left in chains as a sacrifice to save her friends, a prisoner to protect a rapidly expanding rebellion. Her path to imprisonment was fraught with fatal missteps and horrific choices. She is, after all, a teenager barely keeping her head above water. She is bound to fail, to fall. And hopefully, eventually, move forward. Rise. Resist.

There is no greater weapon in the world than words, and now, with all Mare's other weapons taken away, they are the only ones left to her. If given the chance, she would leap for books to strengthen her mind, her heart, and her determination to survive. Against a broken boy king, in the face of a totalitarian government bent on dividing, conquering, and controlling her world, Mare might find solace in a few books familiar to us.


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Within Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling, the boy wizard faces a world like Mare's, under the tyrant thumb of Professor Umbridge, and the willfully ignorant, ineffectual Ministry seeking to deny the growing terrors of Voldemort's return. Though it features the last rays of sunlight before night falls on the Wizarding World, there is hope in this book, and hope will keep Mare alive.



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Between the pages of Wolf by Wolf and its sequel, Blood for Blood, both by Ryan Graudin, Yael, a rare survivor of the Holocaust has extraordinary powers. He is the key to overthrowing a victorious Nazi Reich and the Empire of Japan. Her courage, strength, and constant struggle with her own morality would comfort Mare, who also seeks balance between becoming a hero and becoming a monster.



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William L. Shirer's The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, chronicles the seeds of Hitler's Nazi empire through the end of World War II. It holds necessary wisdom for Mare…and for anyone who believes in understanding history so that it might never be repeated. Recognizing the gathering clouds of tyranny is the best way to weather, and defeat, the coming storm.



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An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir would be more than welcome in Mare's imprisonment, another testament to rebellion, resistance, and the indomitable strength of women who fight back in every way they can. In Laia, a daughter of a people subjugated by another crushing empire, Mare would find not just comfort and determination, but understanding. They are both flawed in their pursuit of freedom, and in this, there is no shame. There is great importance in the flawed female. A phrase that, in truth, means, the real female. A real person. For there is nothing and no one without flaw or imperfection. To see that reflected in An Ember in the Ashes would be a gift to Mare, one that might help her heal scars inside and out.




Victoria Aveyard's King's Cage is on sale now. Add the entire series to your Want to Read shelf!

Red Queen
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Glass Sword
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King's Cage
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What books would you recommend to Mare? Share them with us in the comments.

And check out more recent blogs:
Rereading Is Here! Let's Say It Again. Rereading Is Here!
36 Romantic Book-to-Movie Adaptations
The Best Inspirational Quotes from Books

Rereading Is Here! Let's Say It Again. Rereading Is Here!
Posted by Cybil on February 07, 2017








How much do we love rereading? Let us count the ways…for those days when you just want to spend time with your favorite characters; or when you want to revisit a beloved classic; or maybe you want to brush up on a series before the next installment comes out (we're still waiting, George R.R. Martin and Diana Gabaldon), the list goes on! Rereading is such a core part of many of our readers' lives that having a better way to keep track of the times you've read a book has been your number one feature request. Starting today, that wish has been granted—no more missing out on rereads being counted for your Reading Challenge!

How Do I Start Using the Rereading Feature?
Next time you decide to reread a book that you've already marked as Read on Goodreads, simply mark it as Currently Reading. When you are done, just mark it as Read. You can do this from the Goodreads iOS and Android apps and on Goodreads.com, as well as in the About the Book feature on Kindle (if you have connected your Goodreads and Amazon accounts - click here to connect your accounts). We take care of marking it as a reread for you. Bonus, it will also automatically be included in your Reading Challenge.

Rereading Rolling Out In Stages
While it sounds like a simple thing to add, rereading turned out to be a complex engineering challenge that involved our entire database. To give you a sense of that scope, our 60 million members have added more than 1.7 billion books to their shelves! That's why we're rolling out rereading in stages. So, if you're not seeing it yet, you will soon!

How Do I Know If I Have the New Rereading Feature?
Go to Goodreads.com on desktop, choose a book you have already read, and click Edit on the My Activity area of the Book Page. At the bottom of the review section, you'll see the following:

Rereading

How Do I Add All The Times I've Reread My Favorite Books?
On Goodreads.com on desktop, use the brand-new "Add read date" button in My Activity on the Book Page to enter when you read the book; then hit save! (You don't have to have a start date, but you must have a finish year for the book to count toward your Reading Challenge.)

What Happens If I've Been Keeping Track of My Rereads With The "Number of Times Read" Option?
If you previously used the "Number of times read" field, don't worry, we've already done the work for you and all your rereads are still there. If you added a number, it automatically shows in the new feature. If you used text, we've included it in the private notes section of your review. Simply click on edit Review, to change any dates or add more information.

I've Been Using Different Editions to Track Rereads, What Happens Now?
Our new rereading feature takes that into account! Rereads are comprehensive of all editions. When you view your review, it will indicate that you have also read another edition and include that in the total count.

Rereading

Wondering which are the books Goodreads members most love to reread? Here are some of the most revisited books:

Harry Potter
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The Hunger Games
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Twilight
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Pride and Prejudice
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The Hobbit
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The Fault on Our Stars
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Divergent
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The Great Gatsby
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City of Bones
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The Fellowship of the Ring
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The Lightning Thief
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Jane Eyre
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Which book have you reread the most? Tell us in the comments!

Top 10 Contemporary Romance Books on Goodreads
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on February 06, 2017


Romance Week is brought to you by the latest book in Helen Hardt's Steel Brothers Saga, Burn.

Give your love life a dose of reality with the top contemporary romances on Goodreads. From business moguls to college dropouts, from athletes to artists, the unforgettable characters in these books are people you could meet in your everyday life. (Don't give us that look—it is possible.) How many of these modern love stories have you read?


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Bared to You
by Sylvia Day

Give in to obsession with Gideon and Eva. The bestselling Crossfire series ended last year, and this is the book that started it all.



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Hopeless
Colleen Hoover

From the back-to-back Goodreads Choice Award winner for Best Romance comes a bewitching tale of new love, old secrets, and hard truths.



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The Notebook
by Nicholas Sparks

Grab the tissues! Sparks has a gift for bittersweet tearjerkers (e.g., A Walk to Remember), but the love story of Allie and Noah is arguably his best.



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Fifty Shades of Grey
by E.L. James

Don't pretend—you know all about this one. Christian Grey will see you now, whether you're into reading about him or watching him on the big screen.



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Easy
Tammara Webber

After a hellish frat party, Jacqueline struggles with trust. But with her friends' encouragement, she gives the nice guy in her econ class a chance.



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The Rosie Project
by Graeme Simsion

Don has a problem: He doesn't know if he's capable of love. Enter Rosie, who dismantles all of his preconceived notions about himself and his future.



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Beautiful Disaster
Jamie McGuire

They don't call him a Walking One-Night Stand for nothing. Good thing Abby's not falling for that sort of guy anymore. Well, maybe.



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Him
by Sarina Bowen and Elle Kennedy

Ryan's had a crush on Jamie for years, but one night ruined everything. As they prepare to face off on the hockey rink, Ryan hopes for a second chance.



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Thoughtless
S.C. Stephens

What's the best remedy for a broken heart? For Keira, it's a seemingly meaningless fling with local rockstar Kellan.



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Addicted
by Zane

Exploring the line between passion and addiction, Zoe fights to save her business, her marriage, and her life.




Still looking for love? Sign up for the best deals on romance ebooks and more!

What's your favorite contemporary romance book? Share it with us in the comments! And be sure to check out more of our Romance Week coverage here.

Burn

Top 10 Paranormal Romance Books on Goodreads
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on February 06, 2017


Romance Week is brought to you by the latest book in Helen Hardt's Steel Brothers Saga, Burn.

Want love stories with…bite? We rounded up the top paranormal romances on Goodreads just for you! Whether it's falling for the werewolf next door or hunting sexy vampires by moonlight, these books will transport you to worlds of danger, intrigue, and passion. How many have you read?


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Dark Lover
by J.R. Ward

The last purebred vampire on earth falls for an innocent half-breed woman in this irresistible introduction to the Black Dagger Brotherhood series.



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Moon Called
by Patricia Briggs

Welcome to Mercy Thompson's world. The full-time mechanic and part-time werewolf has her hands full with work, romance, and literal monsters.



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Darkfever
by Karen Marie Moning

Attempting to solve her sister's murder, Mac travels to Ireland for answers—and finds unexpected allies and diabolical foes.



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Halfway to the Grave
by Jeaniene Frost

Can vampires be good? Catherine doesn't think so until a vampire bounty hunter named Bones captures her. (It's a long story.)



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The Darkest Night
by Gena Showalter

Ashlyn comes to Budapest for peace. What she gets instead is Maddox, a dangerous warrior and the first of the irresistible Lords of the Underworld.



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Fantasy Lover
by Sherrilyn Kenyon

Julian is cursed to be a love slave for all eternity. Two thousand years in, he meets Grace, the only woman who wants to set him free.



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Angels' Blood
by Nalini Singh

Hired by an archangel, vampire hunter Elena mixes business with pleasure on a precarious quest to stop an ancient evil.



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Pleasure Unbound
by Larissa Ione

He's a demon, and she's a demon slayer. Sworn enemies, they give in to temptation, risking both their lives.



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Kiss of Midnight
by Lara Adrian

When a night out turns deadly, vampire Lucan reluctantly saves a mortal woman by binding himself to her. Now their fates are tied…forever.



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The Warlord Wants Forever
by Kresley Cole

With war breaking out around them, a vampire general and a Valkyrie engage in a cat-and-mouse game fueled by revenge and lust.





And for a limited time, grab this incredible deal on The Darkest Torment, the latest book in the Lords of the Underworld series!


What's your favorite paranormal romance book? Share it with us in the comments! And be sure to check out more of our Romance Week coverage here.

Burn

Top 10 Historical Romance Books on Goodreads
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on February 06, 2017


Romance Week is brought to you by the latest book in Helen Hardt's Steel Brothers Saga, Burn.

Love isn't what it used to be. Head back to the good ol' days of steamy courtships and extravagant wardrobes—corsets and kilts and bonnets, oh my!—with our roundup of the top historical romances on Goodreads. How many have you read?


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The Duke and I
by Julia Quinn

Their courtship is a sham…or is it? As Daphne and the Duke fake a romance, real feelings begin to emerge, much to their mutual chagrin.



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Pride and Prejudice
by Jane Austen

It's the classic tale of bad first impressions! Fall in love with Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth all over again as the two meander their way to happily ever after.



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Mine Till Midnight
by Lisa Kleypas

Cam Rohan wants to leave London and return to his uncivilized roots. Then he meets Amelia. Suddenly, "being civilized" doesn't seem so bad.



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Outlander
by Diana Gabaldon

The beloved story of Claire Randall and Jamie Fraser begins here. The year is 1945—until a brush with fate sends Claire hurtling back in time to 1743.



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The Bride
by Julie Garwood

At his king's decree, Alec takes an English bride. To his immense surprise, he ends up liking her. Too bad she suspects he killed his first wife.



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Jane Eyre
by Charlotte Bronte

Full of heart and heartbreak, the love story between plain, spirited Jane and arrogant, brooding Mr. Rochester is one for the ages.



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Through the Storm
by Beverly Jenkins

With her life in peril, escaped slave Sable chooses to put her trust in Union Officer Raimond, a man she once betrayed…and still loves.



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Into the Wilderness
by Sara Donati

In a remote New York mountain village, a young teacher befriends a mysterious man, known to the Mohawk people as Between-Two-Lives.



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A Kingdom of Dreams
by Judith McNaught

It begins with an abduction. Headstrong Jennifer vows to make life miserable for her captor until one night changes everything.



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North and South
by Elizabeth Gaskell

Whisked away to the north of England, Margaret Hale begins a tempestuous relationship with a mill owner in this classic of Victorian literature.




Still looking for love? Sign up for the best deals on romance ebooks and more!

What's your favorite historical romance book? Share it with us in the comments! And be sure to check out more of our Romance Week coverage here.

Burn

It's Romance Week on Goodreads
Posted by Cybil on February 06, 2017


Romance Week brought to you by the latest book in Helen Hardt's Steel Brothers Saga, Burn.

It's time for love stories, sweet 'meet cute' tales, steamy guilty-pleasure reads, and favorite heartfelt novels. Yes, it's time for the Goodreads Romance Week.

All week we will be bringing you the best in romance leading up to Valentine's Day, including top romance authors (we're talking J.R. Ward, Nalini Singh, Kristen Ashley, and many more) writing 14-word love stories! Check out their very short (and very clever) stories below.

Check back for more Romance Week!
Visit your favorite author's Goodreads page for their Romance Week updates and follow along on social media using #RomanceWeek.



14-Word Love Stories From Goodreads Top Romance Authors

"'How can I not love you?' I said to Channing Tatum as he blushed."
J.R. Ward

"Mistaken text. Not mistake, but fate. It was you. When we met I knew."
Katy Evans

"Courtesan spy and celibate warrior priest save realm, fall in love. Oops, goodbye celibacy!"
Jacqueline Carey


"She was a woman he couldn't claim. He was a man she couldn't tame."
Brenda Jackson

"An altar-dumped groom tricks his best man and worst enemy into honeymooning together."
Damon Suede

"Blind date to forever: Glances, smiles, holy-forearms, killer-legs, laughter, lips, hands, beds, walls…love."
Emma Chase


"She rescued a wounded wolf…and woke to a man. He smiled. She fell."
Nalini Singh

"See him. Laughter. Conversation. Butterflies. Kisses. Floating. Merging. Terror. Falling. Held. Courage. Forever lifemate."
Christine Feehan



"They met at 17, fell in love. Married at 21, lived happily ever after."
Karen Rose

"The heart drawn on the paper coffee cup that I held until it cooled."
C.S. Pacat



"Black eye. He moved to her, cautious. She looked to him. He was lost."
Kristen Ashley

"Violet shed her rights, Viggo shed his—for what use was freedom without love?"
Bella Forrest

"Every day
Same train
Empty seat
He sits
We talk
We miss our stop."
Kylie Scott

Tell us what you're reading in observance of Romance Week!

Burn