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Goodreads Blog posts (showing 81-90 of 589)
15 Beautiful #GoodreadswithaView Photos to Celebrate the Last Weekend of Summer
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on September 19, 2015


In case you're not tracking the equinox as diligently as your Reading Challenge, we have some news for you: The last day of summer (in the Northern Hemisphere) is Tuesday, September 22. So long, flip flops and beach days. Hello, crunchy leaves and pumpkin-flavored everything!

But before we welcome the fall reading season with open cable-knit sweater arms, let's enjoy our last summer weekend. Take a page from the readers below. They all shared their moments of sunny book bliss with us on Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #GoodreadswithaView.

1. On a rocky beach (via @Rosalieee_x)


2. Beside a pristine lake (via @wowcsmom)


3. In a cozy hammock (via @TrotmanCarol)


4. On a grassy lawn (via @seventeenthbest)


5. Before a rolling fog bank (via @erikajayneas)


6. Above a green canyon (via Vera Nijveld)


7. On soft white sands (via @ahmedelghamril)


8. At a towering lighthouse (via Book Club)


9. Among the grasses (via @theBookClaire)


10. Near a turquoise sea (via @natalia_tju)


11. Perched on a roof (via @AnnaScarletta)


12. Peeking at a garden (via @OpheliasMuse)


13. In paradise (via @bbyclawz)


14. On a Parisian rooftop (via @stefcle)


15. At a bright place (via @karinhwangbooks)


We want to see where YOU read. Share your fall reading photos with us on Facebook and Twitter—don't forget to add the hashtag #GoodreadswithaView!

(Top image credit: Vera Nijveld)
10 Little Known Facts About Agatha Christie
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on September 15, 2015


Agatha Christie was born 125 years ago today! To celebrate, we've used our "little grey cells" to compile a list of fascinating facts about the beloved English crime novelist.

1. At the age of 26, she handled poisons for a living.
After working as a nurse during World War I, Christie became an apothecaries' assistant, allowing her access to a myriad of toxins. "Since I was surrounded by poisons, perhaps it was natural that death by poisoning should be the method I selected," she wrote of her decision to include strychnine and bromide in her first published novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles.

2. Christie did her best thinking while eating apples and drinking tea—in the bath.
Unfortunately, she found modern baths "too slippery, with no nice wooden ledge to rest pencils and paper on," so she was forced to give up the stimulating habit.

3. She was one of the first British people to try surfing.
Christie got the opportunity on a trip to Hawaii with her first husband, Archie Christie. Already a bodyboarder, she took to the sport quite quickly: "I learned to become an expert, or at any rate expert from the European point of view—the moment of complete triumph on the day that I kept my balance and came right into shore standing upright on my board."

4. During World War II, MI5 investigated Christie.
The culprit? Her 1941 mystery, N or M. The British intelligence agency was troubled by the novel's inclusion of a character named Major Bletchley who claimed to possess critical wartime secrets. They worried Christie was actually referring to a real person, her friend Dilly Knox, a codebreaker at Bletchley Park. The novelist insisted the whole thing was a coincidence—"Bletchley? My dear, I was stuck there on my way by train from Oxford to London and took revenge by giving the name to one of my least lovable characters."—and MI5 eventually dropped their investigation.

5. She despised marmalade pudding, going so far as to use it to kill a man in her 1953 novel, A Pocket Full of Rye.
Though, to be fair, the cause of death was taxine, an alkaloid poison. Marmalade was just the delivery method.

6. At the height of her popularity, Christie saw herself as a "sausage machine."
She was producing two books per year at the point, and the exhausting schedule led her to declare, "I'm a sausage machine, a perfect sausage machine."

7. She grew up believing her mother was psychic.
Christie always asserted her childhood had been "very happy," and maybe Mama Clara's second sight had something to do with it.

8. No one can confirm or deny that aliens abducted Christie in 1926.
The theory's not as silly as you might think. (Though, admittedly, it's one of the sillier ones). On December 3, 1926, the mystery writer kissed her daughter goodnight, got in a car, and disappeared for eleven days. Over 15,000 volunteers combed the area, but she couldn't be found. Just as accusations of foul play began to circulate—primarily against her husband Archie—Christie turned up in a hotel in Harrogate, England. She never explained her disappearance.

9. On top of being a famous mystery writer, she was a successful romance novelist.
Christie wrote six romance novels under the pen name Mary Westmacott, including Unfinished Portrait, a semi-autobiographical story about a writer who attempts suicide after her marriage falls apart.

10. Christie has sold more books than there are people in China and America.
With 2 billion copies sold in 103 languages, she remains the best-selling novelist of all time.


Did you know And Then There None was voted the world's favorite Christie novel earlier this month? What's your favorite mystery from the crime writer?
The Top 100 Young Adult Books of All Time
Posted by Jade on September 10, 2015

It's September and to get you in the book-loving, back-to-school mood, we've gone through thousands of Young Adult books to come up with this list of the Top 100 YA Books of all time.

These aren't books that your teachers told you to read. (Though there are a few of those in here, too!) No, this list is the Top 100 YA Books as determined by you, the Goodreads members who truly love YA literature. And it's not just a popularity contest. Every single one of these books also has a rating of 4.0 or above, so whether you're a dystopia die-hard who re-reads The Hunger Games every year or a lover of contemporary tales like The Fault in their Stars, take a look at the Top 100 YA Books to be reminded of old favorites and to discover great new recommendations.

How many have you read? Take a look at the list on Listopia.


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Let us know how many you've read!


28 Books That Got You Hooked on a New Genre
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on September 10, 2015

This week we asked on Facebook and Twitter: What book got you hooked on a new genre? Maybe you never liked Fantasy until you started reading A Game of Thrones, or you were a skeptic about YA until Rainbow Rowell stole your heart. Today we've got the top picks! How many hooked you?

MYSTERY AND THRILLER
Very Good Lives
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Our Souls at Night
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FANTASY
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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HISTORICAL FICTION
Very Good Lives
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SCIENCE FICTION
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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YOUNG ADULT
Very Good Lives
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Our Souls at Night
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ROMANCE
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The Cartel
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The Familiar

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HORROR
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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What book got you hooked on your favorite genre?
What We're Reading at Goodreads This Month
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on September 04, 2015

Terry Pratchett once wrote, "If you have enough book space, I don't want to talk to you." Well, here at the Goodreads office, we can never have enough books—or enough book space! Every other month is Book Perk day at Goodreads; each member of the team gets to order a new book for our ever-expanding library. Check out our latest stash!



You can find the full list of titles on Listopia. What will you be reading next?
U.K. & Ireland: Goodreads on Kindle E-Readers and Fire Tablets Now Available!
Posted by Suzanne on September 01, 2015


Good news for our members in the U.K. and Ireland! Your wish has come true. In the coming weeks, Goodreads will be on your Kindle e-readers and Fire tablets!

Just read an amazing quote and want to tell your friends about it? Now you can highlight and share quotes with your Goodreads friends from inside the book. Finished a book and don't know what to read next? Check your Want to Read shelves to see what's captured your attention already or get inspired with personalized book recommendations from Goodreads.

You can access and update Goodreads on all generations of Kindle Paperwhite, as well as Kindle Voyage and the latest generation Kindle. The update will also be available for Amazon's complete range of current-generation tablets, Fire HD 6, Fire HD 7, and Fire HDX 8.9, as well as previous-generation models Fire HD, Kindle Fire HDX 7, and Kindle Fire HDX 8.9.

In addition to sharing favorite passages, seeing your Want to Read shelves, and personal book recommendations, we've included several of our members' favorite features, including:
  • Track what you want to read, have read, and are currently reading,
  • Rate books after you've read them,
  • Keep up with what your friends are reading in your Updates feed and on their profiles, and
  • Add the books you've purchased on Amazon to your Goodreads shelves.

Let's take a tour.


See what your friends are reading

Read reviews from your friends and the Goodreads community

Easily update your Goodreads shelves—mark a book as Currently Reading and rate it when you finish

This news is the latest in a series of updates we have rolled out for our U.K. and Irish members, including these three features on our website:

  • Preview a book on Goodreads—Want to find out more about a book before you add it to your Want to Read shelf or decide to buy it? Click on the "Preview" icon on a book page to read a sample. Preview is available on any of the millions of titles that have a Kindle edition.
  • Listen to a book on Goodreads—Listen to a sample of an audiobook within your browser to help choose your next audiobook. Click on the "Listen" icon on a book page and the audio sample will start to play. You can listen, pause, and resume the sample. Listen is available for any of the 180,000 books that have an Audible audiobook edition. This is currently only available on the Goodreads.com website on your computer or laptop.
  • Add Your Amazon Books on Goodreads—Easily keep track of the books you have read, are currently reading, and want to read by adding books purchased on Amazon—both print and Kindle—to your Goodreads shelves. You can rate and shelve each book individually. We give you full control over which books to add so you avoid adding any book you bought as a gift. (Or any book you'd rather keep private!)

In the U.K. and Ireland, Goodreads will roll out to Kindle e-readers and Fire tablets in a free, over-the-air update delivered automatically in the coming weeks to all generations of Kindle Paperwhite, as well as Kindle Voyage and the latest generation Kindle. The update will also be available for Amazon's complete range of current-generation tablets, Fire HD 6, Fire HD 7, and Fire HDX 8.9, as well as previous-generation models Fire HD, Kindle Fire HDX 7, and Kindle Fire HDX 8.9. On e-readers, the personalized recommendations feature will be available on the latest generation Kindle, Kindle Paperwhite (6th and 7th generations), and Kindle Voyage.

How will you know you have Goodreads on your device? For Kindle e-readers, you'll see our friendly "g" on the right of the top navigation bar:



For Fire tablets, from the Home screen, tap on Apps and you'll find the Goodreads icon there. Simply tap on these icons and follow the instructions to link your Goodreads account to your device.




Wondering when your country or device will get this? Goodreads is currently available on Kindle e-readers and Fire tablets in the U.S., Canada, Australia, and now the U.K. and Ireland. We don't have details to share about other devices or about introducing Goodreads to Kindle e-readers or Fire tablets in other countries at this time, but our goal is to provide the Goodreads experience on Kindle e-readers and Fire tablets to as many of our members as possible. In the meantime, other options to consider are our iPhone/iPad app or our Android app, available from the Amazon Appstore for Android or from Google Play.

Let us know what you think!
Want to See Your Favorite Book Quote on the Goodreads App?
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on September 01, 2015



Every time you open our iOS and Android apps we show you an inspiring or thought-provoking book quote. Our members say that it's one of their favorite things about the app! The Goodreads engineering team is ready to update our list of quotes, and we'd love to hear your ideas—please share your favorite quote, or a link to the quote on Goodreads, in the comments below.

If you haven't downloaded the Goodreads app yet, you're missing out! It's the perfect solution to all of your book-lover dilemmas. Not sure what to look for when you're in a bookstore or library? Pull out your phone and check your Goodreads Want to Read shelves! Out with a friend who gives you a brilliant book recommendation or inspired by an author interview on the radio? Add books to your Want to Read shelf even when you're on the go!

For iPhone and iPad owners, you can download the app here.

For Android phone and tablet owners, you can download the app here.

Don't forget to give us your book quote suggestions in the comments below. We'll pick the best and add them to our apps.
16 Books You Wish You Actually Paid Attention to in School
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 29, 2015

Assigned reading can be annoying, but you know what else is? Becoming a grown-up whose responsibilities don't include reading. If you missed out on a classic the first time around, try it now—just think how proud your former English teachers will be!

This week we asked on Facebook and on Twitter: What assigned reading book do you wish you had paid more attention to in school? Check out the top answers below.

Very Good Lives
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Our Souls at Night
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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The Cartel
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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The Cartel
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The Familiar
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Which book did you sleep through in English class? Did you ever try and read it later?
Plotters vs. Pantsers: Can You Guess Which Side Stephen King and J.K. Rowling Are On?
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 26, 2015

Since the dawn of storytelling, there have always been two types of storytellers: the Plotters and the Pantsers. (If you're wondering, yes, Pantsers predate the existence of pants.) Never heard the terms before? It's simple. Plotters outline and plan the structure of their entire story, while Pantsers prefer to write by the seat of their pants.

To further understand the ancient Plotter/Pantser divide, we've taken a look at how six contemporary authors write their books. Which method of story crafting do you like best?

The Plotters
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JOHN GRISHAM
"I don't start a novel until I have lived with the story for awhile to the point of actually writing an outline and after a number of books I've learned that the more time I spend on the outline the easier the book is to write. And if I cheat on the outline I get in trouble with the book."


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R.L. STEIN
"If you do enough planning before you start to write, there's no way you can have writer's block. I do a complete chapter by chapter outline."


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J.K. ROWLING
"I always have a basic plot outline, but I like to leave some things to be decided while I write." (While this may sound like Rowling's verging on pantser territory, take a look at her "basic plot outline.")



The Pantsers
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MARGARET ATWOOD
"When I'm writing a novel, what comes first is an image, scene, or voice. Something fairly small. Sometimes that seed is contained in a poem I've already written. The structure or design gets worked out in the course of the writing. I couldn't write the other way round, with structure first. It would be too much like paint-by-numbers."


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PIERCE BROWN
"Some writers are plotters… I, on the other hand, have the curse and rabid delight of being a pantser. I sit down at my computer every day praying for a lightning strike. Common symptoms include pacing, an abnormally clean house, frantic cups of joe, and middle-of-the-night writing breakdowns."


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STEPHEN KING
"Outlines are the last resource of bad fiction writers who wish to God they were writing masters' theses."



Can you tell the difference between a plotted and a pantsed book? Which do you prefer?

15 of Your Biggest Book Pet Peeves
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 22, 2015



Last week we asked on Facebook and on Twitter: What's your biggest book pet peeve?* Check out the top answers below!


1. "Peeps who leave crumbs behind between pages!! #ew" (Joyce B)

2. "When publishers change book covers mid-series! Biggest book pet peeve EVER…"(Amanda White)

3. "My Kindle battery dying!" (Hannah DesWonn)

4. "Seeing someone turn a book inside out by folding it in half while they read. The front and back should never meet!" (Mopsy Prewett)

5. "People who forget that they borrowed a book from you." (Nadia Malik)

6. "When someone rips out the pages of a book. How is the book supposed to make any sense when there are missing pages in it?" (Trish Welsh)

7. "Those strange mystery stains that are usually found between the pages of library books. Did someone spill coffee? Or slash their fingers open with a paper cut? Who knows?" (Traci Mccarty)

8. "Highlighting! Who are these savages?" (Anna Moloney)

9. "Library books last read by a nose picker." (Grace Minnick Hickox)

10. "Paperback covers that delaminate and warped hardcovers." (Paul Wichert)

11. "Dropping books in the toilet. Not that it's ever happened to me…" (Devyn Price)

12. "Broken spines are okay, unless it's a SINGLE crack right in the middle of the spine. That's the WORST." (Charlie)

13. "Dog-eared pages drive me crazy." (Elizabeth Newby)

14. "Sand stuck between pages from reading on the beach." (Ellen)

15. "Movie edition book covers…shudder." (Hollie Ruthless)


Did your book pet peeve not make the list? Then share it with us in the comments!

*And for those of you who have zero pet peeves, maybe Chhandra Bewtra can speak for you: "None. A book is precious, even with disfigurements."