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Popular Nonfiction Authors Pick Summer Reads
Posted by Cybil on May 22, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

The work of a great nonfiction author can expand your world, make you smarter, and maybe even make you think about yourself a bit differently (not to mention strengthen your cocktail party conversations). So, we asked three of our favorite nonfiction authors to recommend some summer reading, and to explain their picks.

You'll hear from Mary Roach (whose fascinating, funny, and addictive science books should surely be added to your Want to Read list), one of today's most popular historians Nathaniel Philbrick (who makes American history as riveting as a thriller), as well as a guy who will make you 'better and faster,' New York Times columnist Charles Duhigg. Did we also mention that all three were 2016 Goodreads Choice Award nominees as well? Yeah, these writers know what they're talking about!


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Mary Roach

Author Mary Roach loves to ask the questions we're dying to know the answers to…sometimes literally (she wrote an entire book on what happens to our postmortem selves in Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers). She's also explored what our lives would look like off of Earth in Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void.

Her other highly entertaining books include close looks at sex (Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex), war (Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War), and the afterlife (Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife).

The science writer selected three works of fiction for her perfect summer reading, including tales of a a cramped road trip, a crackling read about a boozy lawyer, and a struggling poet who bumbles into a series of mishaps.

Heroes of the Frontier by Dave Eggers
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"Should you find yourself crammed in a crappy rented RV with your family this summer, here is fitting, delicious escape. Endearingly verblunget protagonist Josie grabs her kids, ditches her husband, and heads to Alaska on a fraught, hilarious, random, ultimately redemptive road trip. Unlike Josie's children, I did not want it to end. Eggers' genius for fully fleshed, emotionally 3-D characters is much in evidence here. Does your RV have a heater under the sewage tank to keep the contents liquid in cold climes? Do not let your children play with the switch."


I Take You by Eliza Kennedy
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"An unapologetically promiscuous, joyously well-boozed lawyer named Lily finds herself on the brink of marriage with the shit hitting the summer breezes off the Key West resort where her nuptials may or may not transpire. Kennedy also gets hired for screenplays and you will understand why after two pages. I want to quote you a dozen cracking lines of dialog but they won't make sense out of context. Trust me. Funny, funny novel, masterfully executed."


The Financial Lives of the Poets by Jess Walter
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"Matt quits his day job for the ludicrous prospect of a website that delivers financial news in verse. Bills pile up. Foreclosure looms. Marriage is imploding. Late one night, still in his slippers, he drives to the 7-Eleven for milk and more or less doesn't comes back. "Slippers"—as the drug dealers he meets and drives to a party that night call him—blunders into a series of crimes as creatively misguided as his poetry scheme. As with all Walter's books (or anyway, the ones I've read: Beautiful Ruins, Citizen Vince), the writing is witty, well-paced, and just generally amazing."



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Charles Duhigg

Do you ever wish you could change your bad habits or create healthy routines? Pulitzer-prize winning reporter Charles Duhigg has done the research into why you do the things you do, and how you can start changing your patterns. His The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business spent two years on the New York Times bestseller list. And his followup to that bestseller, Smarter Faster Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business researches the latest science of productivity, and how managing your thoughts can change your life.

Duhigg is currently writing the Adventures in Capitalism column for The New York Times. His perfect summer books include a dark western, a sci-fi beach read, and a book he loves to read with his boys.

The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt
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"This is a great, dark western that is funny and strange and exciting and, mostly, just kind of weird. It's a western, but totally unlike what you expect a western to be. And, I hear it's getting made into a movie. So if you read it now, you'll seem really smart when you eventually tell your friends that the book is much better."


The Hike: A Novel by Drew Magary
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"This is really fun escapism, and it's pretty inventive and well written, to boot. If you are on a beach, and want a book that is kind of sci-fi but also kind of not-into-robots-or-aliens-or-spaceships, and you like books that make you think (but not too hard), this is a great choice."


Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
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"I have 2 sons, both under 10 years old, and—literally—there will never be enough Diary of a Wimpy Kid books for us to read together. This is like family magic between two covers."



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Nathaniel Philbrick

Nathaniel Philbrick has written extensively on United States history in books that make historical figures leap from the page. His In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex, that explored the real-life events that inspired Moby Dick, won the National Book Award for Nonfiction. Mayflower: A Story of Community, Courage, and War was a finalist for the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in History. And last year, Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution was a Goodreads Choice Award nominee for history & biography.

So what does the historian consider great summer reading? How about out an explorer's biography, a YA trilogy on the American Revolution, and a Dickens classic?

A Man for All Oceans: Joshua Slocum and the First Solo Voyage Around the World by Stan Grayson
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"Part character study, part adventure story—as close to the definitive word on the enigmatic Joshua Slocum as we'll probably ever have."


Chains by Laurie Halse Anderson
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"The first in an amazing trilogy about the American Revolution for young adults. I don't care what age you are, this is a terrific read."


Little Dorritt by Charles Dickens
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"I'm reading this for the first time and can't put it down—gritty, sad, uplifting, and so very real."


What books are you adding to your summer reading list? Want more inspiration? Check out more of our summer reading coverage here.

Audible

Book Groups Recommend Summer Reading
Posted by Cybil on May 22, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

Goodreads groups are a buzzing hive of great reading selections across, well, almost any genre or subgenre you can think of! So, naturally, we turned to the groups to suggest some additions to your summer reading list. You'll find selections from The History Book Club, the Chick Lit Book Club, the Addicted to YA group, the Dragons & Jetpacks science fiction and fantasy group, and the Happily Ever After Cafe romance novel group.

Want to get even more out of your season of reading? You can also join these groups.

The History Book Club

Membership: 14,000 members

Focus: History and Nonfiction, historical fiction, biographies, autobiographies, world nonfiction and historical fiction, military history, memoirs, government and political science, health-science-medicine, supreme court and civil rights, presidential history and world history and current events, philosophy.

The Group's Summer Reading Picks:

The Sympathizer: The story of a man who is torn between between political ideology and individual loyalties. This novel offers a unique perspective on the Vietnam War through the lens of a conflicted communist sympathizer.

Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life: This biography is not only a self-portrait of a lifelong surfer, it's also an adventure that weaves together the author's own story with history.

The Underground Railroad: The author reimages the Underground Railroad as an actual railroad and tells the story of slaves during the pre-Civil War era through Cora's harrowing experience seeking freedom.
The Sympathizer
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Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life
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The Hangman's Daughter
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Addicted to YA

Membership: 24,000 members

Focus: Young Adult books.

The Group's Summer Reading Picks:

A Court of Wings and Ruin: This is the third book in a popular series and people have been very excited for its release. It seems like almost everyone has read or at least heard of Sarah J. Maas.

Strange the Dreamer: So many people really loved Daughter of Smoke & Bone because of Laini Taylor's beautiful writing. The book has had some mixed reviews, but a lot of people seem to love it.

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children: This book has come highly recommended for years. It's a bit different from the typical summer read because it can be creepy and spooky.

A Court of Wings and Ruin
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Strange the Dreamer
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Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
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Dragons & Jetpacks

Membership: 1,400 members

Focus: Science fiction & fantasy.

The Group's Summer Reading Picks:

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet: A perfect example of modern science fiction, yet it's so wonderfully character driven and has some amazing relationships. Pretty much extremely positive feedback from the group all around!

Age of Myth: Most of our members have read at least one of Michael's books, and I'm pretty sure we have some of his biggest fans in the group. So imagine our delight when he chose to join our group himself, and he posts on a regular basis too!

Retribution Falls: This is THE perfect book to fill that Firefly shaped hole in your life (yes even though the show was cruelly canceled more than 10 years ago). Sir Lancer, our resident 'Ultimate Recommendations' moderator, cannot recommend this book to enough people—so get reading!

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet
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Age of Myth
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Retribution Falls
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Happily Ever After Cafe

Membership: 3,000 members

Focus: To share our love of 'happily ever afters.'

The Group's Summer Reading Picks:

A Man Called Ove: The group focuses mostly on romance and the happily ever afters, but they're willing to expand their reading horizons. This story invokes a variety of emotions guaranteed to bring hours of summer pleasure reading.

The Hating Game: A contemporary romance featuring an unlikely couple who hate each other. It will certainly bring a smile to your face as you read.

Devil in Spring: Lisa Kleypas has consistently produced quality novels that have earned a myriad of fans. This newest historical romance is no exception and will transport you back to another time and place.

A Man Called Ove
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The Hating Game
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Devil in Spring
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Chick Lit Book Club

Membership: 3,500 members

Focus: Reading chick lit books for fun and relaxation.

The Group's Summer Reading Picks:

The Teashop on the Corner: A delightful novel about second chances.

Maybe in Another Life: This novel is a fun and interesting read that chronicles a great friendship, as well as love, choices, and fate.

The Marriage Lie: A good, easy read with a strong, sympathetic woman as the main character. Although it has some romance, it's more of a domestic thriller that hooks you from the beginning.
The Teashop on the Corner
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Maybe in Another Life
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The Marriage Lie
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Be sure to check out more of our summer reading coverage here.

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12 Surprising Books to Give to New Grads
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on May 19, 2017

Let's be honest: Graduates probably don't need another copy of Oh, The Places You'll Go! If you want to educate and entertain the new diploma owner in your life, think beyond Dr. Seuss.

For ideas, we turned to our fantastic followers on Facebook and Twitter, who are always willing to share their book wisdom with us. Check out some of their fun suggestions for unexpected books for grads!


Hyperbole and a Half
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The Know-It-All
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Walden on Wheels
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Cloud Atlas
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My Grandmother Sends Her Regards and Apologises
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The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
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Bossypants
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Books for Living
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The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*cK
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The Magicians
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My Man Jeeves
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You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)
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Don't see your suggestion? Share it with us in the comments!

Check out more recent blogs:
Readers Recommend Their Favorite Nonfiction
Goodreads Hack: Scan a Book Cover!
7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Readers Recommend Their Favorite Nonfiction
Posted by Cybil on May 18, 2017

From a fascinating memoir, to a thrilling history, to a scientific look at ourselves, we love curling up with a great nonfiction book. Always looking to add more books to our Want to Read shelf, we recently asked fellow readers on our Facebook and Twitter pages to tell us about their favorite nonfiction book they like to recommend, and why. More than 1,300 of you weighed in with great reads. Here are some of the most popular responses.

Let us know some of your favorite nonfiction titles in the comments!


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The Glass Castle
by Jeannette Walls

"It was just so interesting. I never knew people lived like that or would want to. She was so honest, really made me feel the story," wrote Helen Crawford Klatt.


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Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption
by Laura Hillenbrand

"It reads like an improbable action thriller, but the hero is a real and remarkable example of the resilience of the human spirit," wrote Steve Doyal.


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The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
by Rebecca Skloot

"Because the blatant injustice of her receiving no compensation for the harvesting of her cancer cells and the subsequent billions of dollars that flowed from those cells highlighted the greed of the research institutions and the pharmaceutical companies," wrote Christine Vojt.


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The Diary of a Young Girl
by Anne Frank

"The fact that she saw so much ugliness and managed to still believe that people, as a whole, are still good is truly inspiring," wrote Barb Cavallaro.


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Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking
by Susan Cain

"This is a powerful book to help people understand introversion as a positive trait rather than something to be 'fixed' and why we need both extroverts and introverts for the world to function," wrote Julie Jordan Merkel.



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Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood
by Trevor Noah

"A bitter sweet tale of life from the perspective of a young boy navigating the complex world of post-Apartheid South Africa. It delivers on so many levels and is refreshing to see how another culture and people view the world," wrote IronFlower Zee.



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Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania
by Erik Larson

"It's about the sinking of the Lusitania. It works back and forth between the ship and the U-boat that sank it. I swear it felt suspenseful even though I knew exactly how it would end," wrote Kristin Powell Strong.


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No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II
by Doris Kearns Goodwin

"If you have any interest at all in American history or WWII, you'll love it. It takes the topic of the American homefront during the war and makes it tangible to modern Americans. Every single person I've ever recommended it to has loved it," wrote Dani Massaro.


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The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment
by Eckhart Tolle

"I've bought this for so many people going through a personal crisis. It grounds me when I'm stressed by circumstances. I keep it close," wrote Jan Bruce .


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The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration
by Isabel Wilkerson

"Brilliantly researched, well written, touching, provocative, stays with you long after you've read the last chapter. I think it should be required reading for juniors or seniors in high school," wrote Anjie Taylor.


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Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers
by Mary Roach

"It is the reason I became a nurse. So interesting!!!! It is all about what happens to the body after death," wrote Christy Petersen Holloway.




Check out more recent blogs:
Goodreads Hack: Scan a Book Cover!
7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
6 Fascinating Friendships Between Famous Authors

Goodreads Hack: Scan a Book Cover!
Posted by Cybil on May 17, 2017

Have you ever been inspired by a friend's book collection and wanted to immediately add a slew of her books to your Want to Read list? Or, maybe you'd like a way to quickly check a book's ratings on Goodreads as you browse through the stacks at your local bookstore or library?

Well, now you only need to point your phone at a book to add it to your Want to Read list, rate it, or see its Goodreads' reviews. Goodreads recently added a fun new feature to our iOS smartphone app: The ability to scan book covers and barcodes. And as a bonus, several of our readers also seem to like the sparking blue dots feature for their selfies!


New to the feature? Here's how to use it:

1) When you tap on the 'scan' icon on the Goodreads app, you'll be taken to a screen that activates your device's camera. If you haven't given the app permission to use the camera, you'll be prompted to do so.

2) If you're using the scanner for the first time, you'll see a message telling you to point the camera at a book cover (or barcode).

3) You will see sparkling blue dots appear on the screen as the scanner attempts to identify the book cover (or barcode). When the book is recognized, a card will appear on the screen with the book cover, title, and the option to shelve the book to your Want to Read shelf or to rate the book.

4) If more than one match is found, a card will appear on the screen with multiple book covers and you'll be asked to choose the correct book.

5) Whether or not you shelve the book, all recognized books will be saved in your 'history' tab. Your scanned 'history' will store up to 100 books.

6) If the book doesn't load after a few scan attempts, it's probably because it hasn't been added to our database yet. In this case, feel free to let our librarians know by contacting them here.

We love the fun our readers are having with this feature! How are you using it?




Cover Scan 2



Cover Scan 2



Check out more recent blogs:
6 Fascinating Friendships Between Famous Authors
10 Favorite Book Moms and Their Words of Wisdom
7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on May 16, 2017

Need another excuse to go to the bookstore this week? We've got seven! Bulk up your Want to Read shelf with these brand-new standalone titles.


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The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir
by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich

You should read this book if you like: True crime, murder mysteries that hit close to home, the nature of forgiveness and truth, disturbing secrets

Check out Marzano-Lesnevich's author-to-author interview with Celeste Ng here.


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Lilli de Jong
by Janet Benton

You should read this book if you like: Historical fiction, the late 19th century, sagas of perseverance, first-time mothers, Philadelphia


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Vanguard
by Jack Campbell

You should read this book if you like: Science fiction, expanding civilization across the stars, uneasy alliances, space pirates


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It's Always the Husband
by Michele Campbell

You should read this book if you like: Psychological thrillers, complex relationships between women, really bad college roommates


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Chuck Klosterman X: A Highly Specific, Defiantly Incomplete History of the Early 21st Century
by Chuck Klosterman

You should read this book if you like: Essays and articles, Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs, pop culture and sports, sharp observations, footnotes



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Flame in the Mist
by Renee Ahdieh

You should read this book if you like: YA Fantasy, samurai, bandits and runaways, girls going undercover, falling for the (suspected) enemy



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How Dare the Sun Rise: Memoirs of a War Child
by Sandra Uwiringiyimana

You should read this book if you like: Memoirs, powerful stories of hope, the Democratic Republic of Congo, survival, art and activism


BONUS: The wait is over—check out three of the buzziest sequels coming out today!

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Full Wolf Moon
by Lincoln Child

The fifth book in the Jeremy Logan mysteries series
(Start off the series with Deep Storm)



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Dating-ish
by Penny Reid

The sixth book in the Knitting in the City contemporary romance series
(Start off the series with Neanderthal Seeks Human)

Check out Reid's book recommendations here.


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Thick as Thieves
by Megan Whalen Turner

The fifth book in The Queen's Thief YA fantasy series
(Start off the series with The Thief)

Check out Turner's book recommendations here.




What are you reading this week? Let's talk books in the comments!

Check out more recent blogs:
6 Fascinating Friendships Between Famous Authors
10 Favorite Book Moms and Their Words of Wisdom
20 Recent Books That Will Hook You from Page One

6 Fascinating Friendships Between Famous Authors
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on May 15, 2017

Ninety-one years ago, J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis encountered each other at an Oxford English faculty meeting. It was not friendship at first sight. "No harm in him," Lewis wrote about his new acquaintance. "Only needs a smack or two."

Of course, it didn't take long for the two to become nearly inseparable. They critiqued each other's early drafts—for Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, and for Lewis, Out of the Silent Planet—and formed their own literary discussion group, The Inklings.

In celebration of their bookish bond, we've taken a look at six other captivating author friendships.


How they met: While working as an editor at Random House, Morrison tried to convince Baldwin to sign a book deal. She failed, but the two became lifelong friends.

Inside their friendship: The two writers admitted the powerful influence the other had on their work, but Morrison put it the most touchingly in her eulogy for Baldwin: "You knew, didn't you? How I relied on your fierce courage to tame wildernesses for me? How strengthened I was by the certainty that came from knowing you would never hurt me? You knew, didn't you, how I loved your love? You knew."


How they met: As a child, Capote went to live with his cousins, who happened to be playmates with Lee. The families lived on the same street in the small town of Monroeville, Alabama.

Inside their friendship: For decades, the big rumor about their friendship was that Capote had either written or heavily edited Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. Finally, a letter from Truman to his aunt, dated a year before the novel's publication, settled the matter. He wrote that he had read his friend's book, liked it very much, and thought she was quite talented.




How they met: A literary star after Jane Eyre's publication, Brontë found herself suddenly thrust into intellectual society. Established novelist Gaskell took the shy woman under her wing.

Inside their friendship: ...And then things got a little weird. Gaskell became obsessed with writing a biography of her friend, but Brontë chafed under the attention, complaining to her publisher: "[Gaskell] seems determined that I shall be a sort of invalid. Why may I not be well like other people?" Two years after Brontë's untimely death, Gaskell published The Life of Charlotte Bronte, a highly controversial take on the famous author.


How they met: Working as a journalist, Gaiman interviewed Pratchett in 1985. The two met at a Chinese restaurant.

Inside their friendship: After reading the first 5,000 words of a story Gaiman was calling William the Antichrist, Pratchett called him up to see if they should work on it together. They did, and the result was the hilarious masterpiece Good Omens. "We got on fine," Pratchett mused later. "Hard to say why, but at bottom was a shared delight and amazement at the sheer strangeness of the universe, in stories, in obscure details, in strange old books in unregarded bookshops." (You can read Gaiman's heartfelt tribute to the late writer here.)


How they met: Alcott had connections. Henry David Thoreau and Nathaniel Hawthorne were close with her family, and Emerson was a lifelong friend of her father's.

Inside their friendship: Emerson gave the young writer free rein in his library. She wrote years later, "His kind hand opened to me the riches of Shakespeare, Dante, Goethe and Carlyle, and I gratefully recall the sweet patience with which he led me round the book-lined room."




How they met: Byron and Shelley met through a mutual acquaintance of sorts, Claire Clairmont—Byron's former mistress and Shelley's stepsister. Claire convinced Shelley and her future husband Percy to travel to Switzerland to meet Byron, and the trio instantly connected.

Inside their friendship: What do literary-minded folk do on a stormy night in? They tell ghost stories, of course. On one such evening, Byron challenged Shelley and a group of friends to write their own ghostly tale. Not long after, Shelley woke from a dream/nightmare with the idea for her classic novel Frankenstein.

Start Planning Your Summer Reading
Posted by Cybil on May 22, 2017


Summer Reading is sponsored by Audible.

From riveting road trip-worthy audiobooks, to your favorite authors' to-read lists, to the hottest books of the season, there's something for everyone whose summer plans include relaxing and reading.


The Hottest Books of Summer
Discover the most beloved new books in every genre


Fiction Authors' Summer Reading PicksNonfiction Writers' Recommendations
What your favorite authors will be readingSee what these researchers read for fun


Bustle & PopSugarThe Summer Challenge           Groups Recs
Editors' new book picksTake the poll                            Reading groups' best books


Best Audiobooks for SummerSummer Reading Deals
Load up before your vacationUp to 80% off ebooks for US readers


Ask the Author
We asked: What books are on your summer reading list? They said…




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10 Favorite Book Moms and Their Words of Wisdom
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on May 12, 2017

Mother's Day is traditionally about real moms—and by real, we mean the moms who had to put up with our antics in the real world—but this year, we also wanted to give a shout-out to the moms who helped raise us from the page. Did your favorite book mother make the list?

MARMEE
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Little Women
by Louisa May Alcott

Mother of Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy
Mom Wisdom: "Oh, my girls, however long you may live, I never can wish you a greater happiness than this!"


MOLLY WEASLEY
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Harry Potter Series
by J.K. Rowling

Mother of Bill, Charlie, Percy, Fred, George, Ron, and Ginny
Mom Wisdom: Beds empty! No note! Car gone—could have crashed—out of my mind with worry—did you care?—never, as long as I've lived—you wait until your father gets home."


MAMA BEAR
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The Berenstain Bears Series
by Stan and Jan Berenstain

Mother of Brother Bear, Sister Bear, and Honey Bear
Mom Wisdom: "There's no question about it! The cubs are watching too much TV."


MA INGALLS
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Little House on the Prairie
by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Mother to Laura, Mary, Carrie, Charles Jr., Grace, Albert, James, and Cassandra
Mom Wisdom: "We start learning the minute we're born, Laura. And if we're wise, we don't stop until the Lord calls us home."


NANNY OGG
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Discworld Series
by Terry Pratchett

Mother to Shawn, Jason, Wayne, Darren, Nev, Shirl, and many more
Mom Wisdom: "Nanny Ogg looked under her bed in case there was a man there. Well, you never knew your luck."


ANGELA MCCOURT
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Angela's Ashes
by Frank McCourt

Mother to Frank, Malachy, Oliver, Eugene, and Margaret
Mom Wisdom: "God, I didn't bring ye into the world to be a family of messenger boys."


MRS. BENNETT
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Pride and Prejudice
by Jane Austen

Mother to Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Kitty, and Lydia
Mom Wisdom: "Well, my comfort is, I am sure Jane will die of a broken heart, and then he will be sorry for what he has done."


MRS. JOSEPHINE RABBIT
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Peter Rabbit Books
by Beatrix Potter

Mother to Flopsy, Mopsy, Cotton-tail, and Peter Rabbit
Mom Wisdom: "Now my dears, you may go into the fields or down into the lane, but don't go into Mr. McGregor's garden. Your father had an accident there. He was put in a pie by Mrs. McGregor."


NATALIE PRIOR
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Divergent Series
by Veronica Roth

Mother to Tris and Caleb
Mom Wisdom: "You're my daughter. I don't care about the factions. Look what they got us. Human beings as a whole cannot be good for long before the bad creeps back in and poisons us again."


MARILLA CUTHBERT
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Anne of Green Gables
by L.M. Montgomery

Adopted mother to Anne
Mom Wisdom: "Good behavior in the first place is more important than theatrical apologies afterwards."


Did we miss your favorite book mom? Then tell us who she is in the comments!

20 Recent Books That Will Hook You from Page One
Posted by Cybil on May 11, 2017

Readers can be patient people, but sometimes we want a book that grabs us right from the start—a story that'll have us flipping pages after only a few moments of bookstore browsing or ereader previewing.

We asked on Facebook and Twitter: What's a recently published book (from the last five years) that hooked you from the first page? Check out the books that received the most shout-outs below!


The Woman in Cabin 10
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The Stranger in the Woods
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The Nightingale
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The Girl with All the Gifts
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Station Eleven
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When Breath Becomes Air
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The Upside of Unrequited
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Exit West
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Lincoln in the Bardo
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Dark Matter
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Truly Madly Guilty
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Hillbilly Elegy
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Behind Her Eyes
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The Fireman
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News of the World
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A Brief History of Seven Killings
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Mississippi Blood
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A Darker Shade of Magic
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Underground Railroad
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A Court of Mist and Fury
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