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9 Book Villains You Love to Hate
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 27, 2016



Sometimes it's just better (or at least more fun) to be bad…. Last week we asked on Facebook and Twitter: Who's your favorite book villain? Your top answers are below!


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Pennywise
It by Stephen King

"The face of the clown in the stormdrain was white, there were funny tufts of red hair on either side of his bald head, there was a big clown-smile painted over his mouth… Then the clown's face changed."


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Cersei Lannister
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin

"She never forgets a slight, real or imagined. She takes caution for cowardice and dissent for defiance. And she is greedy. Greedy for power, for honour, for love."


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Count Olaf
A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicker

"His face was unshaven, and rather than two eyebrows, like most human beings have, he had just one long one. His eyes were very, very shiny, which made him look both hungry and angry."


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Negan
The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman

"I don't feel sad…. I don't feel scared…. I don't feel happy. I'm just…here. That's my strength. That's why I'm alive. You tell me I have to crush a field of babies to keep breathing? Sure."



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Levana
The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer

"Levana's face was fiercely beautiful. Breathtaking in her viciousness."


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Professor Moriarty
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle

"He is the Napoleon of crime, Watson…. He sits motionless, like a spider in the center of its web, but that web has a thousand radiations, and he knows well every quiver of each of them."


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Dolores Umbridge
Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

"They found Professor Umbridge already seated at the teacher's desk, wearing the fluffy pink cardigan of the night before and the black velvet bow on top of her head. Harry was again reminded forcibly of a large fly perched unwisely on top of an even larger toad."


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Jonathan Randall
Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon

"The wary dislike stamped on his face was mingled with a touch of superstitious awe. After all, when you turn someone out into the midst of a pack of wolves on a cold winter evening, you rather expect them to cooperate by being eaten forthwith."


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The Darkling
The Grisha trilogy by Leigh Bardugo

"The Darkling slumped back in his chair. 'Fine,' he said with a weary shrug. 'Make me your villain.'



Did we miss your favorite book villain? Tell us about him or her (or it!) in the comments.

What's New This Week: 7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 23, 2016

Need another excuse to go to the bookstore this week? We've got seven! Bulk up your Want to Read shelf with these brand-new titles.


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Under the Lights
by Abbi Glines

You should read this book if you like: Young adult, romance, small-town stories, football


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The Perfect Horse:
The Daring American Mission to Rescue the Priceless Stallions Kidnapped by the Nazis

by Elizabeth Letts

You should read this book if you like: Nonfiction, history, thrillers, horses

Check out the books Letts recommended to Goodreads members!


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Breath of Earth
by Beth Cato

You should read this book if you like: Fantasy, alternate history, assassins, steampunk



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First Star I See Tonight
by Susan Elizabeth Phillips

You should read this book if you like: Sports romance, mysteries, humor, Chicago

Check out our interview with Phillips!


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The One Man
by Andrew Gross

You should read this book if you like: Historical fiction, thrillers, World War II, dangerous missions


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The Rat Prince
by Bridget Hodder

You should read this book if you like: Fairy tale retellings, children's books (specifically middle grade!)


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Between Two Fires
by Mark Noce

You should read this book if you like: Historical fiction, the Middle Ages, barbarians, romance



What book are you reading this week? Do any of the above catch your eye? Let's talk book in the comments!


Congratulations to the Winners of the 2016 Hugo Awards!
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 20, 2016

Forget starship commanders—the people who really know how "to boldly go where no one has gone before" are writers. The winners of the 2016 Hugo Awards prove this. Each of them pushed the boundaries of creative exploration this past year, taking us to magical worlds, dangerous planets, and dazzling stars.

The Hugo Awards, which annually celebrate the best of science fiction and fantasy, were presented on August 20 at MidAmeriCon II, the 74th World Science Fiction Convention. Take a look at the winners below!


Best Novel
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Winner: The Fifth Season
by N.K. Jemisin


Nominated:
Ancillary Mercy
The Cinder Spires: The Aeronaut's Windlass
Seveneves: A Novel
Uprooted


Best Novella
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Winner: Binti
by Nnedi Okorafor


Nominated:
Perfect State
The Builders
Penric's Demon
Slow Bullets


Best Novelette
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Winner: Folding Beijing
by Hao Jingfang, translated by Ken Liu


Nominated:
And You Shall Know Her by the Trail of Dead
Flashpoint: Titan
Obits
What Price Humanity?


Best Short Story


Best Graphic Story
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Winner: The Sandman Overture
by Neil Gaiman and J.H. Williams III


Nominated:
Erin Dies Alone
Full Frontal Nerdity
Invisible Republic, Vol. 1
The Divine



Check out the full list of winners here. What's the best fantasy or science fiction book you've read recently? Share it with us in the comments!

20 Recently Published Books High School Teachers Should Assign
Posted by Catherine on August 19, 2016

We're all familiar with the books that fill high school reading lists—classics by the likes of Salinger, Shakespeare, Dickens, Austen, and Orwell. But how often do we come across a book by a contemporary writer and think, wow, this would make a fantastic addition to that list? Be it a thought-provoking portrayal of society, a personal journey of self-discovery or extreme courage, or a historical tour de force that resonates powerfully today. We asked on Facebook and Twitter what recent books you would assign to high school students. Your top picks are below!


The Book Thief
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Station Eleven
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I Am Malala
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The Help
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Homegoing
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Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe
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The Nightingale
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Thirteen Reasons Why
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The Boys in the Boat
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The Serpent King
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Brown Girl Dreaming
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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
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Just Mercy
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The Perks of Being a Wallflower
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Off Balance
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Between the World and Me
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All the Light We Cannot See
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Eleanor and Park
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The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
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Unbroken
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What recently published books would you assign to a high school class? Tell us your picks—and why!—in the comments.
16 "Assigned-Reading" Books You Loved in High School
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 17, 2016

Remember when reading books was homework? Sometimes we wish we could travel back in time and tell our younger selves to cherish those years more. As a new batch of fresh-faced students traipse to their classrooms, let's hope they take their required reading seriously. Resist the urge to look up book summaries on the Internet, kids! It'll be worth it—even for The Old Man and the Sea. (Well, no promises on that one.)

Last week we asked on Facebook and Twitter: What was your favorite "assigned-reading" book in high school? Check out your top answers below.


The Catcher in the Rye
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To Kill a Mockingbird
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Beloved
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A Tale of Two Cities
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The Outsiders
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Brave New World
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The Great Gatsby
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Pride and Prejudice
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Wuthering Heights
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Things Fall Apart
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The Handmaid's Tale
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The Martian Chronicles
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The Lord of the Flies
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The Picture of Dorian Gray
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Macbeth
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The Good Earth
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Did we miss your favorites? Were you the rare high school student who adored The Old Man and the Sea? Share your "assigned-reading" thoughts in the comments!
How Well Do You Know Harry Potter and the Cursed Child?
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 16, 2016



Tell us your score in the comments!
Who Are the World's Highest-Paid Authors?
Posted by Catherine on August 11, 2016

Forbes just released its annual list of the world's highest-paid authors, and together they earned a whopping $269 million over the last 12 months.

Topping the list—no surprises here—is James Patterson, whose fiercely prolific output has made the 69-year-old one of the world's bestselling author with more than 350 million books sold. Between June 2015 and June 2016, the thriller writer published more than a dozen titles and his pre-tax earnings for the year topped $94 million.

In a distant second place is children's author Jeff Kinney, the Diary of a Wimpy Kid creator, who made $19.5 million in the past year.

Coming in third is J.K. Rowling with $19 million. Continued sales of her Harry Potter books, the new play Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, as well as Universal's Harry Potter theme parks contributed to her earnings.

The list was compiled using estimated income from sales of books, ebooks, and audiobooks as well as money from television and film adaptations.

Other familiar names on the list are John Grisham, Stephen King, Danielle Steele, and Nora Roberts. The only newcomer this year is Paula Hawkins, whose bestselling The Girl on the Train, and subsequent film deal, earned her $10 million.

Here is the Forbes list in full with some Goodreads suggestions from each author.


James Patterson—$95 million
Along Came a Spider
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Kiss the Girls
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1st to Die
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Bullseye
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Jeff Kinney—$19.5 million
Diary of a Wimpy Kid
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Rodrick Rules
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The Last Straw
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Old School
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J.K. Rowling—$19 million
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
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Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
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Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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John Grisham—$18 million
A Time to Kill
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The Firm
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The Client
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Rogue Lawyer
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Stephen King—$15 million
The Shining
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The Stand
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Carrie
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End of Watch
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Danielle Steele—$15 million
Safe Harbour
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Sisters
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The Gift
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The Apartment
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Nora Roberts—$15 million
Vision in White
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Born in Fire
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Blue Dahlia
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Bay of Sighs
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E.L. James—$14 million
Fifty Shades of Grey
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Fifty Shades Darker
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Fifty Shades Freed
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Grey
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Veronica Roth—$10 million
Divergent
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Insurgent
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Allegiant
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The Transfer
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John Green—$10 million
The Fault in Our Stars
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Looking for Alaska
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Paper Towns
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An Abundance of Katherines
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Paula Hawkins—$10 million
The Girl on the Train
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George R.R. Martin—$9.5 million
A Game of Thrones
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A Clash of Kings
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A Storm of Swords
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A Feast for Crows
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Dan Brown—$9.5 million
Angels & Demons
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The Da Vinci Code
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The Lost Symbol
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The Lost Symbol
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Rick Riordan—$9.5 million
The Lightning Thief
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The Sea of Monsters
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The Lost Hero
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The Hidden Oracle
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Who's your favorite highest-paid author?
Share Your Kindle Notes and Highlights with Your Friends (Beta)
Posted by Eric Franklin on August 10, 2016

Tweet about Goodreads with Kindle Notes

At Goodreads, we believe books are better with friends, and we’re always looking for ways to help you share more of what you read. If you like to make notes and highlights in the Kindle books you’re reading, we have good news for you. With today’s beta launch of Kindle Notes & Highlights on Goodreads, you can now share your notes and highlights on Goodreads and spark great conversations with your friends!

Let your friends see what you “wrote in the margins”
You can now access and share your Kindle notes and highlights right from the book pages on Goodreads.com (PC or laptop). You can even edit your notes directly on Goodreads, and your changes will sync back to your Kindle book. By default, your Kindle notes and highlights are only viewable by you—you’re always in control. You can choose to share them with friends by marking any (or all) of your notes and highlights as “Visible,” and your friends will be able to view, like, and comment on them. You can also share them by sending the URL of your Kindle Notes & Highlights page to anyone you like—for instance, a colleague, professor, or classmate.

Your notes page

Power up your book club
If you’re in a book club, Goodreads and Kindle make it easier to share your thoughts and discuss books—even between meetings. First, make sure you’re all friends on Goodreads, and then those who read on Kindle can choose to make their notes and highlights visible. You’ll all be able to see those notes on Goodreads.com (whether you read with Kindle or not), and you can start liking and commenting on them right away.

And if you’re worried about spoilers, we’ve got you covered! You can mark individual notes and highlights as spoilers, so your friends can decide when they’re ready to read them.

Writing a review? Easily access all your Kindle notes and highlights
Whether you’re writing a book review or diving back into an old favorite, your notes and highlights are right there in one place, alongside your rating and when you read it. That makes it easier to glance through and incorporate them into your review while you write it. More than ever, Goodreads helps you capture your thoughts and feelings about a book over time, allowing you to re-visit the key moments months or years later.

How do I find my Kindle notes and highlights on Goodreads?
  • If you haven’t already, you’ll first need to link your Goodreads and Amazon accounts. To do this, click here, sign in, and scroll to the Amazon section to connect your accounts.
  • Shelve your book on Goodreads. If you are reading on Kindle, you can easily mark it as “Currently Reading” from the “About this Book” feature on Kindle. (Here’s a tip for Kindle iOS readers: With Auto-Update, you can now set your Kindle iOS app to automatically mark each book you start as “Currently Reading” when you first open it, and as “Read” when you finish. This is a small but powerful new feature designed to give you one less thing to do!)
  • Highlight and add notes to interesting passages as you read on Kindle. Because you linked your Goodreads and Kindle accounts, the notes and highlights you make will be accessible on Goodreads.com—viewable only by you.
  • Go to your book’s page on Goodreads.com (from your PC or laptop) and click on the Kindle Notes & Highlights link in the My Review section:

Where to find your notes

Found them! Now how do I share my Kindle notes and highlights on Goodreads?
You can share any of your notes and highlights by switching them to “Visible.” The more you share, the more there is for you and your friends to discuss!

How to make your notes visible

This is currently available on Goodreads.com from my PC or laptop. When will this be available more widely?
We’re working on it! We plan to support mobile soon.

What does it mean that this feature is in “Beta”?
“Beta” means this feature is still early in its development, and we’re excited to get your feedback about it! We’re already hard at work on enhancements to make it even better. In the meantime, let us know what you think by using the Feedback widget on your Kindle Notes & Highlights pages on Goodreads.com.

In which markets is this supported?
This beta launch is supported within the following Kindle marketplaces: United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and India, for customers who have linked their Goodreads and Amazon accounts.

We can’t wait to see all the notes and highlights you share!
Vote for Your Favorite Oprah Book Club Book
Posted by Danny on August 09, 2016

Last week Oprah announced her latest book club selection—Colson Whitehead's The Underground Railroad—and it's already a runaway bestseller. Ever since its inception (Oprah's Book Club started in September of 1996 with Jacquelyn Mitchard's The Deep End of the Ocean), the book club has catapulted new books (and a few classics) to the top of the charts. But which one is the most beloved? If you're like our Goodreads' audience, you likely fell for Wally Lamb's She's Come Undone, Barbara Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible, and Jeffrey Eugenides' Middlesex. See the full list here and up vote your favorite today.

She's Come Undone
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The Poisonwood Bible
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Night
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Middlesex
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White Oleander
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The Road
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Love in the Time of Cholera
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House of Sand and Fog
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Vote for your favorite Oprah Book Club book here, then leave a comment below.
12 Nonfiction Books to Satisfy Your Olympic Obsession
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on August 05, 2016

If you can't feel the thrill of victory (or even the agony of defeat) from Rio during this year's Summer Olympics, then try your bookstore. Nestled in the nonfiction section are riveting tales of athletic ambition, ripped from the headlines you remember—and from the behind-the-scenes scoops that never went to print. Whether you're a lifelong fan or an Olympic newbie ("Is it just me, or did they not have an Olympics last year?"), you'll find someone to root for in these stories of scandal, passion, and triumph.


The Boys in the Boat
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Grace, Gold, and Glory
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Brazil's Dance with the Devil
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Golden Girl
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The Three-Year Swim Club
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Dream Team
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The Games: A Global History of the Olympics
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Silent Gesture
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End of the Perfect 10
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In the Water They Can't See You Cry
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Triumph
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Off Balance
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What book inspires your inner Olympic athlete? Share it with us in the comments!
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