Hang on, everybody! We’re in for a wild ride. The publishing industry is changing so rapidly, the information you find online today may be obsolete tomorrow. It’s exhilarating, terrifying, mind-boggling, intimidating, confusing, and very, very exciting!

The good news is:

-Most experts think books will continue to thrive in both print and digital formats. More options for readers and greater accessibility (ordering from your bed at midnight) is increasing the number of books people read. Sales are strong.

-Print-on-demand will allow mid-list and out-of-print books to continue to sell, and will help eliminate huge print runs of books that don’t sell and must be stored, remaindered, and destroyed – a practice that was terrible for the environment and a royal pain for booksellers and publishers.

-With 50 pages or so available in downloadable free samples, we’ll all waste less money on books we thought we’d love after reading the first few pages in the bookstore, but lost interest in after a chapter or two.

-Niche books that never saw print because of a limited market will be available to those with an specific interest.

-Lower prices will result from savings in shipping and storing costs, and e-books currently offer authors a greater share in the profits.

-New vetting processes will emerge for self-publishers – reputable reviewers offering readers a “clearing house” for navigating the huge numbers of digital uploads they’ll be wading through. Customer reviews online and book bloggers will remain a driving force in word-of-mouth sales of books.

In a city where many start-up companies have been birthed, I’m all in. I’m convinced that the emergence of new technology will benefit the reader in the long run. In the meantime, it’s much more productive to welcome the new baby than to bitch about the birthing pains. And as for e-books, don’t say “never” if you’ve never tried one. You can always download the Kindle or Nook app to your computer or phone. Then if you download a few free sample chapters from Amazon or Nook, you can give it a try without spending a penny.
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Published on November 06, 2010 19:28 • 237 views • Tags: e-books, print-on-demand, publishing
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message 1: by Doug (new)

Doug Yes, I agree that most of the gloom and doom talk is people mostly ignoring all of the positive changes. As I said before, "books" as a concept have always involved a core, dedicated few and that hasn't changed. You still have a core of dedicated readers that read and talk about books all the time, an if a quarter of the people in this country aren't book people, this isn't proof of the end.

"With 50 pages or so available in downloadable free samples, we’ll all waste less money on books we thought we’d love after reading the first few pages in the bookstore, but lost interest in after a chapter or two."

The downside being it can't be long before start gaming this principle and put everything worth anything into the free sample.

Doug
Si Vales, Valeo


message 2: by Beck (new)

Beck McDowell True, I feel that way about most movies. The trailer's always loaded with all the good stuff, and then the rest of the movies's a let-down. I guess this is where branding comes in - finding author names we learn to trust, although that's not foolproof.

The other problem with the big e-chunk of free sample is that I've really started relying heavily on it, and some books I've wound up loving were certainly slow starters, which I tend to forget.


message 3: by Doug (new)

Doug Yes, the slow starter aspect is something I didn't even add above. It would be impossible to get into certain awesome books (such as Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell) if you only went by the first 50 pages. You would blink a couple of times and go "Um, nothing happens..."

Doug
Si Vales, Valeo


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