All my life I have loved the stories told in books. My first book was A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson. It was a typical children’s book out of the 1930’s according to the illustrations I remember. I kept that book until the mold in Washington got to it. My one older brother would read the Winnie the Pooh stories to me and I would bang my heel into the chair in rhythm to his voice. Later at the one room country school, I would read the book delivered every month. By the time I was in the fourth grade I would start with the eighth grade novels and work my way down. I read everything including the one or two intended for any kindergarten children. Then I would read the encyclopedias and the dictionary. My love affair with the written word continues. I have three walls filled with books from my childhood and those purchased when I was an adult.

The newspaper once was a handy guide to books as the reviews would pique my interest. Notice the word once? I have last Sunday’s LA Times book section in front of me. There are reviews on new books, none of which I have any desire to read.

Two are graphic novels. I’m sorry, the last time I read those I was a teenager and the less said about those the better. One is a review of the best comics of 2012 and the explanation of how and why they are such hits. I don’t read comics to have them explained. I read them to laugh. Another is a young adult novel that the review does nothing to inspire me to read it. Another is a “literary” spy novel, a genre that I really don’t appreciate. Another is an autobiographer about the life of someone I do not care about nor the field that defines her tastes. The last is a biography of a famous Renaissance painter. At first I thought it held promise, as two of my bookshelves are filled with biographies. The reviewer, however, pans the book. Without being able to pick the book up and reading a few pages there is no way I am going to spend forty dollars for a book.

The start of a new book can be such an intimate occasion; the heft of it, the smell, the opening of the cover, all promising a new world within its pages. Over the last few years with the exception of the Harry Potter series, most have been a disappointment. I can think of three that were not: The Help, 1639, and Cloud Atlas. Not surprisingly, the last two are science-fiction. That was a pleasant surprise as many of the science fiction books and stories I’ve read during the last ten years have been a disappointment.

What about you? Do you have difficulty finding a book to suit your reading needs are do you stick with one genre and ignore the rest?
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Published on November 30, 2012 15:56 • 187 views • Tags: books-disappointments
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message 1: by Yezall (new)

Yezall Strongheart I NEVER have that problem! I can always find something to read. My biggest problem is finding the TIME to read. My idea of a vacation is a deserted island and a stack of books!


message 2: by Brian (last edited Nov 30, 2012 05:04PM) (new)

Brian Bigelow If I have my druthers I would read nothing but history and historical fiction. End up reading also but history is my love. Really wish more indies wrote in it especially history. Because I do love history so much about half of the horror I write is set in historical settings.


message 3: by Eve (new)

Eve Gaal I love your blog post. You kind of remind me of Andy Rooney. God Bless his lovable but slightly cranky soul.


message 4: by Mari (new)

Mari Yezall wrote: "I NEVER have that problem! I can always find something to read. My biggest problem is finding the TIME to read. My idea of a vacation is a deserted island and a stack of books!"

I have plenty to read. It's just that so many of the recent stories I've read are (to my tastes) lacking. Finding time to read is another big issue.


message 5: by Mari (new)

Mari Brian wrote: "If I have my druthers I would read nothing but history and historical fiction. End up reading also but history is my love. Really wish more indies wrote in it especially history. Because I do love ..."
I read a lot of history books. Historical fiction often turns into romance stories. By the way, my two books are filled with western U.S. history and they aren't romances.


message 6: by Mari (new)

Mari The Desert Rocks wrote: "I love your blog post. You kind of remind me of Andy Rooney. God Bless his lovable but slightly cranky soul."

Thank you, Desert Rocks. I can't claim to be 1/10 of his humor. I loved listening to him on 60 Minutes! I even have something of his somewhere around here.


message 7: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Adams I can't help browsing in just about anything. Not really into horror or graphic novels, but I will at least read a few pages of something to see it the author can get interested in his or her journey.


message 8: by Mari (new)

Mari Victoria wrote: "I can't help browsing in just about anything. Not really into horror or graphic novels, but I will at least read a few pages of something to see it the author can get interested in his or her jour..."

I'll browse, but most of them I know where the plot is going and what they are going to say. That doesn't hold my interest. I've read some and they would be well crafted, but the story just wasn't there. It was in the two books I mentioned.


message 9: by William (new)

William I read a variety of genres, though I do stay out of horror, mostly.


message 10: by Mari (new)

Mari William wrote: "I read a variety of genres, though I do stay out of horror, mostly."

I will even read a horror story to see if it holds my interest. They usually do not. There are times when Stephen King gets it right. I can admire Dean Koontz's craft, but I can't seem to care about his characters.


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