Robert C. Solomon

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Robert C. Solomon

Author profile


born
in Detroit, Michigan, The United States
September 14, 1942

died
January 02, 2007

genre

influences


About this author

Robert C. Solomon (September 14, 1942 – January 2, 2007) was a professor of continental philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin.

Early life

Solomon was born in Detroit, Michigan. His father was a lawyer, and his mother an artist. After earning a B.A. (1963) at the University of Pennsylvania, he moved to the University of Michigan to study medicine, switching to philosophy for an M.A. (1965) and Ph.D. (1967).

He held several teaching positions at such schools as Princeton University, the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of Pittsburgh. From 1972 until his death, except for two years at the University of California at Riverside in the mid-1980s, he taught at University of Texas at Austin, serving as Quincy Lee Cen
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Average rating: 3.92 · 2,327 ratings · 198 reviews · 73 distinct works · Similar authors
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More books by Robert C. Solomon…
“What gives life meaning is a form of rebellion, rebellion against reason, an insistence on believing passionately what we cannot believe rationally. The meaning of life is to be found in passion—romantic passion, religious passion, passion for work and for play, passionate commitments in the face of what reason knows to be meaningless.”
Robert C. Solomon, Spirituality for the Skeptic: The Thoughtful Love of Life

“ما يعطي الحياة معنى هو شكل من التمرد , التمرد ضد العقل , الاصرار على الايمان بشغف فيما لانستطيع الايمان به عقلياً . معنى الحياة يوجد في الشغف , الشغف الرومانسي والشغف الديني والشغف بالعمل واللعب , التزامات شغوفة في مواجهة ما يعرف العقل انه بلا معنى”
Robert C. Solomon, Spirituality for the Skeptic: The Thoughtful Love of Life

“We choose our friends on the basis of, among other things, our conception of ourselves. That's not to say that friendship is narcissistic, it doesn't follow that we choose people 'like ourselves'; in fact we might choose people very different than ourselves. For example, if I'm not very intelligent, and I'm concerned about my lack of intelligence, I might take up with an extremely intelligent woman, precisely in order to have her intelligence, in some sense, radiate onto me.

The idea is that in friendship what we do is we pick people who are going to reinforce, in some sense, our own conception of ourselves. So if I think of myself as intelligent, or I want to think of myself as intelligent, whether or not I pick a partner who is also intelligent, what is going to be essential is that it's going to be a partner who somehow expands my notion of my own intelligence, either by telling me all the time, perhaps, how intelligent I am, or maybe by always contradicting me in such a way that I can prove my intelligence with her or him.”
Robert C. Solomon, No Excuses: Existentialism and the Meaning of Life