Alan Lee





Alan Lee

Author profile


born
in Middlesex, The United Kingdom
August 20, 1947

gender
male

genre

influences


About this author

Alan Lee is an English book illustrator and movie conceptual designer. He was born on 20 August 1947 in Middlesex, England and studied at the Ealing School of Art, specialising in illustration, and has illustrated a wide range of books, including Faeries (with Brian Froud), The Mabinogion, Castles, Merlin Dreams, The Black Ships of Troy and The Wanderings of Oysseus.

He is best known for his award winning work on The Lord of The Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien - having done illustration work for both the books and the Peter Jackson directed movies. As of 2011, he is working on The Hobbit movies, based on Tolkien's book, again directed by Peter Jackson.

Tolkien's work has inspired him ever since he read his books at an early age. Alan Lee is also insp
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Average rating: 4.06 · 93,439 ratings · 3,077 reviews · 16 distinct works · Similar authors
The Lord of the Rings Sketc...
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4.24 of 5 stars 4.24 avg rating — 7,026 ratings — published 2005 — 2 editions
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Castles (An Original Bantam...
4.37 of 5 stars 4.37 avg rating — 161 ratings — published 1984 — 4 editions
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The Lord of the Rings Poste...
4.23 of 5 stars 4.23 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 1999
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The Hobbit Poster Collection
3.69 of 5 stars 3.69 avg rating — 13 ratings2 editions
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Tolkien's Middle-Earth and ...
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4.43 of 5 stars 4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2002
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The Mabinogion
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3.95 of 5 stars 3.95 avg rating — 4,286 ratings — published 1200 — 108 editions
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The Lord Of The Rings: Birt...
4.14 of 5 stars 4.14 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1993
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Scudamore's Year: The Natio...
4.4 of 5 stars 4.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1990
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Lord of the Rings Address Book
3.67 of 5 stars 3.67 avg rating — 6 ratings
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Cheltenham Racecourse
5.0 of 5 stars 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1985
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“When I draw something, I try to build some kind of history into it. Drawing an object that has a certain amount of wear and tear or rust; or a tree that is damaged. I love trying to render not just the object, but what it has been through.”
Alan Lee

“I keep drawing the trees, the rocks, the river, I'm still learning how to see them; I'm still discovering how to render their forms. I will spend a lifetime doing that. Maybe someday I'll get it right.”
Alan Lee

“I first read The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit when I was eighteen. It felt as though the author had taken every element I'd ever want in a story and woven them into one huge, seamless narrative; but more important, for me, Tolkien had created a place, a vast, beautiful, awesome landscape, which remained a resource long after the protagonists had finished their battles and gone their separate ways. In illustrating The Lord of the Rings I allowed the landscapes to predominate. In some of the scenes the characters are so small they are barely discernible. This suited my own inclinations and my wish to avoid, as much as possible, interfering with the pictures being built up in the reader's mind, which tends to be more closely focussed on characters and their inter-relationships. I felt my task lay in shadowing the heroes on their epic quest, often at a distance, closing in on them at times of heightened emotion but avoiding trying to re-create the dramatic highpoints of the text. With The Hobbit, however, it didn't seem appropriate to keep such a distance, particularly from the hero himself. I don't think I've ever seen a drawing of a Hobbit which quite convinced me, and I don't know whether I've gotten any closer myself with my depictions of Bilbo. I'm fairly happy with the picture of him standing outside Bag End, before Gandalf arrives and turns his world upside-down, but I've come to the conclusion that one of the reasons Hobbits are so quiet and elusive is to avoid the prying eyes of illustrators.”
Alan Lee

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