Thomas Joiner





Thomas Joiner

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Joiner, Thomas.
Joiner, Thomas E.
Joiner, Thomas E. Jr

Thomas Joiner is an American academic psychologist and leading expert on suicide. He is the Robert O. Lawton Professor of Psychology at Florida State University, where he operates his Laboratory for the Study of the Psychology and Neurobiology of Mood Disorders, Suicide, and Related Conditions. Joiner holds a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.



Average rating: 3.89 · 332 ratings · 48 reviews · 17 distinct works · Similar authors
Why People Die by Suicide
3.87 of 5 stars 3.87 avg rating — 223 ratings — published 2005 — 5 editions
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Myths About Suicide
3.82 of 5 stars 3.82 avg rating — 83 ratings — published 2010 — 4 editions
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Lonely at the Top: The High...
3.82 of 5 stars 3.82 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2011 — 3 editions
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The Interpersonal Theory of...
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4.83 of 5 stars 4.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2009
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The Perversion of Virtue: U...
4.5 of 5 stars 4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2014 — 4 editions
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The Interpersonal Solution ...
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3.67 of 5 stars 3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2005
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The Interactional Nature Of...
5.0 of 5 stars 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1999
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Pet Insurance
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2011
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The Interpersonal, Cognitiv...
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2006 — 7 editions
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Suicide Science: Expanding ...
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2000 — 3 editions
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“There are people who fantasize about suicide, and paradoxically, these fantasies can be soothing because they usually involve either fantasizing about others' reactions to one's suicide or imagining how death would be a relief from life's travails. In both cases, an aspect of the fantasy is to exert control, either over others' views or toward life's difficulties. The writer A. Alvarez stated, " There people ... for whom the mere idea of suicide is enough; they can continue to function efficiently and even happily provided they know they have their own, specially chosen means of escape always ready..." In her riveting 2008 memoir of bipolar disorder, Manic, Terri Cheney opened the book by stating, "People... don't understand that when you're seriously depressed, suicidal ideation can be the only thing that keeps you alive. Just knowing there's an out--even if it's bloody, even if it's permanent--makes the pain bearable for one more day."

This strategy appears to be effective for some people, but only for a while. Over longer periods, fantasizing about death leaves people more depressed and thus at higher risk for suicide, as Eddie Selby, Mike Amestis, and I recently showed in a study on violent daydreaming. A strategy geared toward increased feelings of self-control (fantasizing about the effects of one's suicide) "works" momentarily, but ultimately backfires by undermining feelings of genuine self-control in the long run.”
Thomas Joiner, Myths About Suicide



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