Arthur Llewellyn  Basham





Arthur Llewellyn Basham


Born
in Essex, The United Kingdom
May 24, 1914

Died
January 27, 1986

Genre


Professor Arthur Llewellyn Basham (24 May 1914 – 27 January 1986) was a noted historian and indologist and author of a number of books.Possibly his most popular book is The Wonder That was India (Sidgwick & Jackson, London, 1954) - published seven years after the 1947 Independence of India. Revised editions of the book were released in 1963 and then 1967. Rupa & Co, New Delhi brought out a paperback edition in 1981. Macmillan Publishers Ltd., London, brought out a paperback edition in 1985. By 2001, the paperback version was in its 37th edition. Amazon.com staff review/book description reads "most widely used introduction to Indian civilization. Although first published in 1954, it has remained a classic interpretation."
Basham also
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Average rating: 4.07 · 1,201 ratings · 62 reviews · 10 distinct works · Similar authors
The Wonder That Was India: ...

4.08 avg rating — 1,062 ratings — published 1954 — 12 editions
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A Cultural History of India

4.13 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 1975 — 3 editions
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The Origins and Development...

3.97 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 1989 — 2 editions
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The Illustrated Cultural Hi...

3.84 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2007
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The Little Clay Cart: An En...

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4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1994
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History and Doctrines of th...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1982
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The Civilizations Of Monsoo...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1974
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The Little Clay Cart: An En...

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3.25 avg rating — 75 ratings — published -150 — 9 editions
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Sources of Indian Tradition...

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3.63 avg rating — 57 ratings — published 1958 — 3 editions
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Aryan and Non-Aryan in India

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1979 — 3 editions
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More books by Arthur Llewellyn Basham…
“It is not wholly surprising, however, that, when India began to reassert herself, two nations should have replaced the single British Raj; but all impartial students must regret that the unity of the Indian sub-continent has been once more lost, and trust that the two great nations of India and Pakistan may soon forget the bitterness born of centuries of strife, in cooperation for the common welfare of their peoples.”
Arthur Llewellyn Basham, The Wonder That Was India: A Survey of the Culture of the Indian Sub-Continent Before the Coming of the Muslims

“If for a time Buddhism became to all intents and purposes a separate religion, denying the [Page 266] Vedas, the ordinary layman might not see it in that light. For him Buddhism was one of many cults and faiths, by no means mutually exclusive, all of which led to salvation, and all of which were respectable and worthy of honour.”
Arthur Llewellyn Basham, The Wonder That Was India: A Survey of the Culture of the Indian Sub-Continent Before the Coming of the Muslims

“The course of training of the yogī was divided into eight stages, reminding us of the eightfold path of Buddhism, but far less practical: (1) Self-control (yama), the practice of the five moral rules: non-violence, truthfulness, not stealing, chastity, and the avoidance of greed. (2) Observance (niyama), the regular and complete observance of the above five rules. (3) Posture (āsana), sitting in certain postures, difficult without practice, which are thought to be essential to meditation. The most famous of these is padmāsna, the “Lotus Posture”, in which the feet are placed on the opposite thighs, and in which gods and sages are commonly depicted. (4) Control of the Breath (prānāyāma), whereby the breath is held and controlled and the respiration forced into unusual rhythms, which are believed to be of great physical and spiritual value. (5) Restraint (pratyāhāra), whereby the sense organs are trained to take no note of their perceptions. (6) Steadying the Mind (dhāranā), by concentration on a single object, such as the tip of the nose, the navel, an icon, or a sacred symbol. (7) Meditation (dhyāna), when the object of concentration fills the whole mind. (8) Deep Meditation (samādhi), when the whole personality is temporarily dissolved.”
Arthur Llewellyn Basham, The Wonder That Was India: A Survey of the Culture of the Indian Sub-Continent Before the Coming of the Muslims

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