Michael T. Klare





Michael T. Klare


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The United States
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Michael T. Klare is a Five Colleges professor of Peace and World Security Studies, whose department is located at Hampshire College, defense correspondent of The Nation magazine, and author of Resource Wars and Blood and Oil: The Dangers and Consequences of America's Growing Petroleum Dependency (Metropolitan).

Klare also teaches at Amherst College, Smith College, Mount Holyoke College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Klare also serves on the boards of directors of Human Rights Watch, and the Arms Control Association. He is a regular contributor to many publications including The Nation, TomDispatch, Mother Jones, and is a frequent columnist for Foreign Policy In Focus.

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Average rating: 3.72 · 1,063 ratings · 104 reviews · 23 distinct works · Similar authors
Blood and Oil: The Dangers ...

3.78 avg rating — 357 ratings — published 2004 — 8 editions
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Resource Wars: The New Land...

3.74 avg rating — 320 ratings — published 2001 — 6 editions
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The Race for What's Left: T...

3.74 avg rating — 187 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
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Rising Powers, Shrinking Pl...

3.65 avg rating — 147 ratings — published 2008 — 8 editions
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Rogue States and Nuclear Ou...

3.27 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1995 — 5 editions
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Low Intensity Warfare:  Cou...

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3.09 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1987 — 3 editions
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World Security

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3.50 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1991 — 6 editions
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Supplying Repression: U.S. ...

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3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1981 — 2 editions
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Войни за ресурси

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings
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Beyond the "Vietnam Syndrom...

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2.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1981
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“Around the world, countries flush with cash but poor in arable land are now rushing to secure vast amounts of acreage in land-rich but underdeveloped nations. In theory, of course, such trades could benefit both sides, but in practice they usually raise extraordinarily troubling ethical and political questions. What”
Michael T. Klare, The Race for What's Left: The Global Scramble for the World's Last Resources

“In some cases, the materials at stake will be viewed as so essential to national survival or economic well-being that compromise is unthinkable. It is difficult, for example, to imagine that the United States will ever allow the Persian Gulf to fall under the control of a hostile power, or that Egypt will allow Sudan or Ethiopia to gain control over the flow of the Nile River. In such situations, national security considerations will always prevail over negotiated settlements that could be perceived as entailing the surrender of vital national interests.”
Michael T. Klare, Resource Wars: The New Landscape of Global Conflict

“Ultimately, the United States is prepared to intervene with its own forces to defend the regime against internal attack. This was made abundantly clear in 1981, when President Reagan declared that the United States would not allow an insurgent movement to overthrow the Saudi monarch, as had occurred in Iran two years earlier. “I will not permit [Saudi Arabia] to be an Iran,” he told reporters at the White House.67 Direct American involvement in a civil war is, no doubt, the last thing that Washington would like to see happen. To prevent this, great emphasis is being placed on intelligence activities and the disruption of antigovernment organizations. But President Reagan’s 1981 statement provides an unambiguous indication of America’s determination to protect the Saudi monarchy at all costs. Nor is there any evidence to suggest that this commitment has in any way been diluted since Reagan’s time; if anything, the United States is even more closely wedded to the Saudi regime now than it was in 1981. And while it is impossible to predict the exact nature of the U.S. response to any particular threat to the regime, it is likely to be swift, muscular, and lethal.”
Michael T. Klare, Resource Wars: The New Landscape of Global Conflict



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