Stanley Coren

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Stanley Coren


Born
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, The United States
January 01, 1942

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Average rating: 3.88 · 3,380 ratings · 402 reviews · 42 distinct works · Similar authors
How To Speak Dog: Mastering...

3.96 avg rating — 903 ratings — published 2000 — 17 editions
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How Dogs Think: What the Wo...

3.96 avg rating — 668 ratings — published 2004 — 12 editions
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The Intelligence of Dogs: A...

3.92 avg rating — 402 ratings — published 1994 — 10 editions
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Born to Bark: My Adventures...

3.82 avg rating — 238 ratings — published 2010 — 7 editions
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Do Dogs Dream? : Nearly Eve...

3.70 avg rating — 202 ratings — published 2012 — 5 editions
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Sleep Thieves: an Eye-Openi...

3.90 avg rating — 162 ratings — published 1996 — 11 editions
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The Modern Dog: How Dogs Fi...

3.99 avg rating — 131 ratings — published 2008 — 7 editions
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Why Does My Dog Act That Wa...

3.65 avg rating — 146 ratings — published 2006 — 12 editions
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Why We Love the Dogs We Do:...

3.72 avg rating — 151 ratings — published 1998 — 13 editions
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The Pawprints of History: D...

3.68 avg rating — 115 ratings — published 2002 — 7 editions
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“The greatest fear dogs know is the fear that you will not come back when you go out the door without them.”
Stanley Coren

“From the dog’s viewpoint, however, they are directly asserting dominance with that stare. When you respond by giving him what he wants, the dog interprets this as a submissive gesture on your part, and also reads this as your acceptance that the dog has a higher status in the pack than you do.”
Stanley Coren, How To Speak Dog: Mastering the Art of Dog-Human Communication

“We do not perceive what is "out ther," rather we perceive what is "in here." Our senses can only inform us of their own status. They can inform us of the elesctrical status of neurons or the physical or the chemical status of the receptors. The outside world is never taken into our consciousness. The outside world is rather our own creation, psychologically synthesized from the mass of sensations that envelope us. In many respects, the ultimate question that perception must ask was stated by John Stuart Mill in 1865. He asked, "What is it we mean, or what is it which leads us to say, that the objects we perceive are external to us, and not a part of our own thoughts?" That remains, perhaps, the ultimate, unresolved perceptual puzzle.”
Stanley Coren



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