Donald T. Phillips





Donald T. Phillips

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Average rating: 4.04 · 3,653 ratings · 318 reviews · 48 distinct works · Similar authors
Lincoln on Leadership: Exec...
4.08 of 5 stars 4.08 avg rating — 2,187 ratings — published 1992 — 9 editions
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The Founding Fathers on Lea...
3.63 of 5 stars 3.63 avg rating — 110 ratings — published 1997 — 12 editions
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Martin Luther King, Jr., on...
4.14 of 5 stars 4.14 avg rating — 80 ratings — published 1999 — 16 editions
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Lincoln on Leadership
3.72 of 5 stars 3.72 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 1992 — 2 editions
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Character In Action: The U....
3.17 of 5 stars 3.17 avg rating — 24 ratings — published 2003 — 3 editions
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Lincoln Stories for Leaders
3.86 of 5 stars 3.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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On the Wing of Speed: Georg...
4.5 of 5 stars 4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2006
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The Clinton Charisma: A Leg...
3.33 of 5 stars 3.33 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2007 — 3 editions
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A Deeper, Darker Truth
3.5 of 5 stars 3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2009
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A Deeper, Darker Truth: Tom...
4.33 of 5 stars 4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2009
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“When the conduct of men is designed to be influenced, persuasion, kind, unassuming persuasion, should ever be adopted. It is an old and a true maxim, that a “drop of honey catches more flies than a gallon of gall.” So with men. If you would win a man to your cause, first convince him that you are his sincere friend. Therein is a drop of honey that catches his heart, which, say what he will, is the great high road to his reason, and which, when once gained, you will find but little trouble in convincing his judgment of the justice of your cause, if indeed that cause really be a just one. On the contrary, assume to dictate to his judgment, or to command his action, or to mark him as one to be shunned and despised, and he will retreat within himself, close all the avenues to his head and his heart; and tho’ your cause be naked truth itself . . . you shall no more be able to [reach] him, than to penetrate the hard shell of a tortoise with a rye straw. Such is man, and so must he be understood by those who would lead him, even to his own best interest. [Italics added]”
Donald T. Phillips, Lincoln on Leadership: Executive Strategies for Tough Times

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