Peter Hopkirk





Peter Hopkirk


Born
in The United Kingdom
December 15, 1930

Died
August 22, 2014

Genre


Average rating: 4.22 · 6,051 ratings · 508 reviews · 14 distinct works · Similar authors
The Great Game: The Struggl...

4.30 avg rating — 3,695 ratings — published 1990 — 14 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Trespassers on the Roof of ...

4.08 avg rating — 594 ratings — published 1982 — 12 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Foreign Devils on the Silk ...

4.11 avg rating — 634 ratings — published 1980 — 19 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Setting the East Ablaze: Le...

4.16 avg rating — 416 ratings — published 1984 — 10 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Like Hidden Fire: The Plot ...

4.28 avg rating — 352 ratings — published 1994 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Quest for Kim: In Search of...

3.83 avg rating — 178 ratings — published 1997 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Tibet: Reisverhalen

by
really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1999
Rate this book
Clear rating
Mission To Tashkent

by
3.92 avg rating — 74 ratings — published 1992 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
A Ride to Khiva

by
3.89 avg rating — 65 ratings — published 1875 — 18 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
On Horseback Through Asia M...

by
3.72 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 1898 — 16 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Peter Hopkirk…
“Evidence he discovered in an ancient rubbish dump showed that, after being abandoned to the desert for several centuries, Endere was then reoccupied by the Chinese, but some time after Hsuan-tsang’s visit. The circular rampart had clearly been built to try to keep the warlike Tibetans at bay. The Tibetan graffiti found within the rampart bear witness to what is already known from the Chinese annals – that at the end of the eighth century the fierce Tibetans finally drove the Chinese from the area.”
Peter Hopkirk, Foreign Devils on the Silk Road: The Search for the Lost Treasures of Central Asia

“Jeannette Mirsky, his biographer, explains: ‘Dandan-uilik was the classroom where Stein learned the grammar of the ancient sand-buried shrines and houses: their typical ground plans, construction, and ornamentation, their art, and something of their cultic practices. He also used it as a laboratory in which to find the techniques best suited to excavating ruins covered by sands as fluid as water, which, like water trickled in almost as fast as the diggers bailed it out. He had no precedents to guide him, no labour force already trained in the cautions, objectives and methods of archaeology.… He felt his way from what was easy to what was difficult, from what he knew he would find to discoveries he had not dared to anticipate. His approach was both cautious and experimental.”
Peter Hopkirk, Foreign Devils on the Silk Road: The Search for the Lost Treasures of Central Asia

“While they were in Urumchi, Pelliot met an old friend – or rather foe – from Peking days. Following the defeat of the Boxers, the Duke Lan, brother of the movement’s leader and himself deeply implicated in the uprising, had been exiled for life to Urumchi, where he devoted his remaining years to photography. ‘We had fought one another in 1900, but the passage of time heals all things,’ Pelliot wrote afterwards, adding: ‘We sealed our friendship with many a glass of champagne.”
Peter Hopkirk, Foreign Devils on the Silk Road: The Search for the Lost Treasures of Central Asia