Philip Gibbs





Philip Gibbs


Born
in London, The United Kingdom
May 01, 1877

Died
March 10, 1962

Genre


Sir Philip Armand Hamilton Gibbs was an English journalist and novelist who served as one of five official British reporters during the First World War. Two of his siblings were also writers, A. Hamilton Gibbs and Cosmo Hamilton.
The son of a civil servant, Gibbs was born in London and received a home education and determined at an early age to develop a career as a writer. His debut article was published in 1894 in the Daily Chronicle; five years later he published the first of many books, Founders of the Empire.
He started work at the publishing house at Cassell; then editor of Tillotson's literary syndicate; was literary editor for Daily Mail in 1902; moved to Daily Express, and then to Daily Chronicle in 1908; also worked with Daily Graph
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Average rating: 4.16 · 160 ratings · 17 reviews · 86 distinct works · Similar authors
Now It Can Be Told

4.25 avg rating — 127 ratings — published 1920 — 47 editions
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The Soul of the War

4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2006 — 18 editions
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No Price for Freedom

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings2 editions
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Deathless Story of the Titanic

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
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The Battles Of The Somme

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2013 — 6 editions
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Knowledge Is Power: A Guide...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2011
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England Speaks

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2010
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European Journey

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
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The Romance of George Villi...

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2009 — 6 editions
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The Street of Adventure

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013 — 6 editions
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More books by Philip Gibbs…
“If I have learned anything it is that pity is more intelligent than hatred, that mercy is better than justice, that if one walks around the world with friendly eyes one makes good friends.”
Philip Gibbs

“about the German boy's throat and tried to strangle him and to stop another dreadful cry. The second officer made haste. He thrust his revolver close to the”
Philip Gibbs, Now It Can Be Told

“From the point of view of high generalship those holding attacks had served their purpose pretty well. From the point of view of mother's sons they had been a bloody shambles without any gain.
The point of view depends on the angle of vision.”
Philip Gibbs