Regina Maria Roche





Regina Maria Roche

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Average rating: 3.98 · 44 ratings · 10 reviews · 12 distinct works · Similar authors
Clermont
3.81 of 5 stars 3.81 avg rating — 26 ratings — published 1798 — 2 editions
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The Children of the Abbey
4.25 of 5 stars 4.25 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 1796 — 5 editions
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Nocturnal Visit: A Tale
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
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The Children of the Abbey; ...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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The Tradition of the Castle...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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The Houses of Osma and Alme...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2010
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The Tradition of the Castle...
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Bridal of Dunamore; and Los...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings3 editions
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The discarded son; or, Haun...
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Contrast (Volume 1)
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2010
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“The lawn gently sloped to a winding stream, so clear as perfectly to reflect the beautiful scenery of heaven, now glowing with the gold and purple of the setting sun; from the opposite bank of the stream rose a stupendous mountain, diversified with little verdant hills and dales, and skirted with a wild shrubbery, the blossoms of which perfumed the air with the most balmy fragrance. Lord Mortimer prevailed upon Amanda to sit down upon a rustic bench, beneath the spreading branches of an oak, enwreathed with ivy; here they had not sat long ere the silence which reigned around was suddenly interrupted by strains, at once low, solemn and melodious, that seemed to creep along the water, till they had reached the place where they sat; and then, as if a Naiad of the stream had left her rushy couch to do them homage, they swelled by degrees into full melody, which the mountain echoes alternately revived and heightened. It appeared like enchantment to Amanda, and her eyes, turned to lord Mortimer, seemed to say it was to his magic it was owing.”
Regina Maria Roche, The Children of the Abbey

“…They arrived when the sober grey of twilight had clad every object. Amanda viewed the dark and stupendous edifice, the gloom of which was now heightened by the shadows of evening, with venerable awe; the solitude, the silence, which reigned around, the melancholy murmur of the waves, as they dashed against the rocks, all heightened the sadness of her mind; yet it was not quite an unpleasing sadness, for with it was mingled a degree of that enthusiasm, which plaintive and romantic spirits are so peculiarly subject to feel in viewing the venerable grandeur of an ancient fabric renowned in history. As she entered a spacious hall, curiously wainscoted with oak, ornamented with coats of arms, spears, lances, and old armour, she could not avoid casting a retrospective eye to former times, when perhaps in this very hall, bards sung the exploits of those heroes, whose useless arms now hung upon the walls; and she wished, in the romance of the moment, some grey bard near her, to tell the deeds of other times, of kings renowned in our land, and chiefs we behold no more.”
Regina Maria Roche, The Children of the Abbey

“The dreadful explanation lord Mortimer now found himself under a necessity of giving; the shame of acknowledging he was so deceived; the agony he suffered from that deception, joined to the excessive agitation and fatigue he had suffered the preceding night, and the present day, so powerfully assailed him at this moment, that his senses suddenly gave way, and he actually fainted on the floor.”
Regina Maria Roche, The Children of the Abbey



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