Robin Dunbar





Robin Dunbar

Author profile


born
in Liverpool, The United Kingdom
June 28, 1947

gender
male

genre


About this author

Robin Ian MacDonald Dunbar, British anthropologist and evolutionary psychologist. He is a specialist in primate behaviour. Currently Professor of Evolutionary Psychology and head of the Social and Evolutionary Neuroscience Research Group at the Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford.


Average rating: 3.82 · 962 ratings · 121 reviews · 29 distinct works · Similar authors
Grooming, Gossip, and the E...
4.12 of 5 stars 4.12 avg rating — 258 ratings — published 1997 — 9 editions
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How Many Friends Does One P...
3.53 of 5 stars 3.53 avg rating — 244 ratings — published 2010 — 10 editions
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Human Evolution: A Pelican ...
4.06 of 5 stars 4.06 avg rating — 82 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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The Human Story
3.8 of 5 stars 3.80 avg rating — 94 ratings — published 2004 — 5 editions
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The Science of Love and Bet...
3.43 of 5 stars 3.43 avg rating — 83 ratings — published 2012 — 12 editions
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Evolutionary Psychology: A ...
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3.77 of 5 stars 3.77 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 2005 — 3 editions
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The Trouble With Science
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 1995 — 8 editions
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Nowa historia ewolucji czło...
3.56 of 5 stars 3.56 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2014
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Oxford Handbook of Evolutio...
3.88 of 5 stars 3.88 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2007 — 2 editions
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The Evolution of Culture: A...
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3.89 of 5 stars 3.89 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1999 — 4 editions
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“It's perhaps not so much how your amygdala is tuned that makes you politically extreme, but that your intrinsic nervousness makes you more responsive to things that might seem to threaten your particular social world. Education probably plays an important role in dampening that response by allowing the brain's frontal lobes (where much of the brain's conscious work goes on) to counteract the emotional responses with a more considered view, so explaining why education is invariably the friend of liberal politics.”
Robin Dunbar, How Many Friends Does One Person Need?: Dunbar's Number and Other Evolutionary Quirks

“In primates at least, infanticide seems to have been the crucial factor driving the evolution of monogamous mating systems.”
Robin Dunbar, Human Evolution: A Pelican Introduction

“There are probably two key aspects of culture that stand out as being uniquely human. One is religion and the other is story-telling. There is no other living species, whether ape or crow, that do either of these. They are entirely and genuinely unique to humans.”
Robin Dunbar, Human Evolution: A Pelican Introduction



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