David Wright





David Wright

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Average rating: 3.78 · 1,516 ratings · 197 reviews · 347 distinct works · Similar authors
English Romantic Verse
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3.86 of 5 stars 3.86 avg rating — 59 ratings2 editions
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The Canterbury Tales: A Pro...
4.03 of 5 stars 4.03 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 2011
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Receiving the Atonement
4.61 of 5 stars 4.61 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2013
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Fire on the Beach: Recoveri...
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4.21 of 5 stars 4.21 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2001 — 6 editions
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Yesterday's Gone: Episode 1...
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3.29 of 5 stars 3.29 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2012
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Downs: The History of Disab...
4.33 of 5 stars 4.33 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 2010 — 4 editions
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A Liturgy for Stones
4.25 of 5 stars 4.25 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2003
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Pipe Companion: A Connoisse...
3.56 of 5 stars 3.56 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2000
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Available Darkness: Episode 1
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4.5 of 5 stars 4.50 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2012
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The Penguin Book of English...
4.17 of 5 stars 4.17 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1968
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“People only rooted for the underdog in movies, not in middle school.”
David Wright, Yesterday's Gone: Season One

“…our Father’s plan subjects us to temptation and misery in this fallen world as the price of authentic joy.  Without tasting the bitter, we actually cannot understand the sweet…But growth means growing pains.  It also means learning from our mistakes in a continual process made possible by the Saviors grace, which he extends both during and “after all we can do.”  Adam and Eve learned constantly from their often harsh experience…Yet because of the Atonement, they could learn from their experience without being condemned by it.  Christ’s sacrifice didn’t just erase their choices and return them to an Eden of innocence.  That would be a story with no plot and no character growth.  His plan is developmental…(Ensign May 2004, 97)”
David Wright, Receiving the Atonement

“Christ wants no disciple who is forced to follow Him, but that is the way Satan would love to get disciples.  While Lucifer has great power, and coercion is Satan’s preferred approach to getting followers, even he cannot force us.  He resorts to deception to get us to follow him.  He has to because his plan for happiness is a lie.  We must recognize that being deceived is our choice-- Satan cannot force it.  Lasting peace becomes impossible for one who is deceived.  Piercing through that deception is the challenge of every mortal.”
David Wright, Receiving the Atonement



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