Martin Gardner





Martin Gardner

Author profile


born
in Tulsa, Oklahoma, The United States
October 21, 1914

died
May 22, 2010

gender
male

genre

influences


About this author

Martin Gardner was an American mathematics and science writer specializing in recreational mathematics, but with interests encompassing micromagic, stage magic, literature (especially the writings of Lewis Carroll), philosophy, scientific skepticism, and religion. He wrote the Mathematical Games column in Scientific American from 1956 to 1981, and published over 70 books.


Average rating: 4.06 · 323,678 ratings · 5,877 reviews · 218 distinct works · Similar authors
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4.08 of 5 stars 4.08 avg rating — 609 ratings — published 1952 — 6 editions
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The Colossal Book of Mathem...
4.38 of 5 stars 4.38 avg rating — 230 ratings — published 2001 — 2 editions
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My Best Mathematical and Lo...
4.12 of 5 stars 4.12 avg rating — 258 ratings — published 1994 — 4 editions
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Aha! Gotcha: Paradoxes to P...
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4.18 of 5 stars 4.18 avg rating — 233 ratings — published 1975 — 8 editions
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Did Adam and Eve Have Navels?
3.51 of 5 stars 3.51 avg rating — 222 ratings — published 2000 — 6 editions
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Aha! Insight
4.29 of 5 stars 4.29 avg rating — 148 ratings — published 1978 — 4 editions
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Hexaflexagons and Other Mat...
4.27 of 5 stars 4.27 avg rating — 119 ratings — published 1988
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The Night Is Large: Collect...
4.05 of 5 stars 4.05 avg rating — 131 ratings — published 1996 — 3 editions
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Relativity Simply Explained
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3.79 of 5 stars 3.79 avg rating — 121 ratings — published 1997 — 4 editions
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The Whys of a Philosophical...
3.96 of 5 stars 3.96 avg rating — 110 ratings — published 1983 — 8 editions
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More books by Martin Gardner…
“There is still a difference between something and nothing, but it is purely geometrical and there is nothing behind the geometry.”
Martin Gardner

“Her constant orders for beheading are shocking to those modern critics of children's literature who feel that juvenile fiction should be free of all violence and especially violence with Freudian undertones. Even the Oz books of L. Frank Baum, so singularly free of the horrors to be found in Grimm and Andersen, contain many scenes of decapitation. As far as I know, there have been no empirical studies of how children react to such scenes and what harm if any is done to their psyche. My guess is that the normal child finds it all very amusing and is not damaged in the least, but that books like Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and The Wizard of Oz should not be allowed to circulate indiscriminately among adults who are undergoing analysis.”
Martin Gardner, The Annotated Alice: The Definitive Edition

“If you ask me to tell you anything about the nature of what lies beyond the phaneron… my answer is “How should I know?”… I am not dismayed by ultimate mysteries… I can no more grasp what is behind such questions as my cat can understand what is behind the clatter I make while I type this paragraph.”
Martin Gardner, The Whys of a Philosophical Scrivener