Martin Wolf





Martin Wolf

Author profile


About this author


Average rating: 3.49 · 228 ratings · 27 reviews · 20 distinct works · Similar authors
Why Globalization Works
3.36 of 5 stars 3.36 avg rating — 154 ratings — published 2004 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Fixing Global Finance
3.75 of 5 stars 3.75 avg rating — 59 ratings — published 2008 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Shifts and the Shocks: ...
3.86 of 5 stars 3.86 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Role of the State in an...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2004
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Shifts and the Shocks: ...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
Die Geplante Unternehmensst...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2007
Rate this book
Clear rating
Oxygen Transport to Tissue ...
by
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
Der Soldat Der Bundeswehr I...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2007
Rate this book
Clear rating
Modeling Credit Risk and Pr...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2001
Rate this book
Clear rating
Oxygen Transport to Tissue ...
by
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2012
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Martin Wolf…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“A country with secure property rights, scientific inquiry and technological innovation will become richer. But, since division of labour is limited by the size of the market, it will also benefit from trade, not just in goods and services, but in ideas, capital and people. The smaller a country is, the greater the benefits. Trade is far cheaper than empire, just as internal development is a less costly route to prosperity than plunder. This was the heart of Angell's argument.”
Martin Wolf, Why Globalization Works

“In a country supposedly dedicated to the ideals of market economics, arguably the most important social function of finance – lending for home purchase – had become almost completely nationalized.”
Martin Wolf, The Shifts and the Shocks: What We've Learned-and Have Still to Learn-From the Financial Crisis

“This book aims to learn from that mistake. One of its goals is to ask whether Minsky’s demand for a theory that generates the possibility of great depressions is reasonable and, if so, how economists should respond. I believe it is quite reasonable. Many mainstream economists react by arguing that crises are impossible to forecast: if they were not, they would either already have happened or been forestalled by rational agents. That is certainly a satisfying doctrine, since few mainstream economists foresaw the crisis, or even the possibility of one. For the dominant school of neoclassical economics, depressions are a result of some external (or, as economists say, ‘exogenous’) shock, not of forces generated within the system.”
Martin Wolf, The Shifts and the Shocks: What we've learned - and have still to learn - from the financial crisis



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Martin to Goodreads.