Imogen Rhia Herrad




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Imogen Rhia Herrad

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January 2011


Born and brought up in Germany, Imogen Herrad has also lived in Wales, London and Argentina. She writes in German and English. Her short stories and articles (in English) have been published in magazines and anthologies in Wales, Canada and the US. Her documentary programmes for German public radio (in German) include pieces about Mary Magdalene, Toussaint L'Ouverture, Zora Neale Hurston, the Mapuche people of Patagonia; and the cultural histories of sheep, dragons, the apple and hermaphrodites, respectively.
She lives in Cologne and Cardiff.

Average rating: 3.30 · 33 ratings · 7 reviews · 3 distinct works · Similar authors
Beyond the Pampas: In Searc...

3.67 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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The Woman Who Loved an Octo...

3.10 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2007 — 3 editions
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2.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2010
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It was in Aberystwyth that I first heard of Patagonia.
‘Bydd rhywun yn siarad am Batagonia yn y coleg heno!’ my flatmate told me, excitedly, one evening. (There’ll be somebody in the college giving a talk about Patagonia tonight.)
I gave her a blank look. Patagonia, what was that? Could you eat it? Read it? Could you wear it?
‘Patagonia! In Argentina,’ she explained impatiently. ‘Right at the sout... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on September 07, 2015 15:20 • 17 views • Tags: patagonia-wladfa

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The Woman Who Loved an Octopus: and Other Saints' Tales (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated May 13, 2015 06:31PM
Description: Short stories based on the lives and legends of thirteen Celtic women saints from the first millennium.
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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling
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Visigothic Spain 409-711 by Roger Collins
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More of Imogen's books…
Muriel Spark
“[My novel] took up the sweetest part of my mind and the rarest part of my imagination; it was like being in love and better. All day long when I was busy [...], I had my unfinished novel personified almost as a secret companion and accomplice following me like a shadow wherever I went, whatever I did.”
Muriel Spark, Loitering With Intent

Dorothy Parker
“The two most beautiful words in the English language are 'cheque enclosed.”
Dorothy Parker

Raymond Chandler
“Throw up into your typewriter every morning. Clean up every noon.”
Raymond Chandler

Raymond Chandler
“The actual writing is what you live for. The rest is something you have to get through in order to arrive at the point.”
Raymond Chandler

Nevada Barr
“Deliberately, she took a long drink. It wasn't as good as she remembered, but then little was. She caught herself in that thought and was ashamed. Cynicism was okay, bitterness a pain in the neck. The hairline difference between the two was hope and humor. The cynic had both, the embittered, nothing.”
Nevada Barr




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