James Glaeg




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James Glaeg

Goodreads Author


gender
male

genre

influences
Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emily Bronte

member since
August 2012


About this author

James Glaeg is a journalist and documentarian whose favored milieu has been the movie and television factories of Hollywood. He has given numerous lectures and workshops on iconic media figures. PHOTO: James Glaeg on a movie set during the period when he was inadvertently gathering the interviews that would eventually lead to CASTING NORMA JEANE. "Alas," as he writes in the book's Notes and Sources, "life is what happens while you're making other plans. My great ambition, then, as a budding film auteur of nineteen, was to write FOR Marilyn Monroe, not ABOUT her."


With Casting Norma Jeane out for a year now, I'm frankly glad it's taken this long for someone to ask the following vital question: "How were you able to get into the characters' thoughts? The book reads like a fictionalized account based on what you learned about Marilyn Monroe."

I say I'm glad it's taken this long because the last thing in the world I'd want the reader to feel is that any scen... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on August 25, 2013 19:27 • 89 views • Tags: casting-norma-jeane, james-glaeg, marilyn-monroe, narrative-nonfiction
Average rating: 3.65 · 40 ratings · 15 reviews · 1 distinct work · Similar authors
Casting Norma Jeane: A Star...
3.65 of 5 stars 3.65 avg rating — 40 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
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Casting Norma Jeane: A Starlet is Transformed Into Marilyn Monroe (Biographies & Memoirs)
3 chapters   —   updated Oct 22, 2012 07:40AM
Description: In the summer of 1946 a restless model described as "pretty but plain" steps into a role that will make her the most famous woman in the world.

James's Recent Updates

6485088
date: January 17, 2015 10:00AM
location: Epsilon Sigma Alpha, 580 Minnetonka Blvd, Minneapolis, MN, The United States
description: Author James Glaeg will explain what sets his book apart from the more than 1000 that have so far been published about Marilyn Monroe. He will then read several illustrative passages and take questions.
James rated a book 5 of 5 stars
The Berlin Stories by Christopher Isherwood
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I've just compared the 1972 film Cabaret with its two predecessor works, namely 1) this 1945 book and 2) the 1955 black-and-white filmization of John Van Druten's 1951 stage adaptation of the book, called I Am a Camera.

The book itself is truly memora

...more
James rated a book 5 of 5 stars
The Last Chronicle of Barset by Anthony Trollope
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This is the final installment of Trollope's six-novel portrayal of Anglican clerical life in the 1850's, which in their totality are called the Chronicles of Barset. Up front I should make clear that there's another installment within these chronicl

...more
James rated a book 4 of 5 stars
The Small House at Allington by Anthony Trollope
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Since I'm reading the Barset Chronicles in order, this has been for me the 5th to read. Trollope noted in his Autobiography that it ranked as his most popular work (i.e., during his lifetime). Also that he himself esteemed it as one of his very best ...more
James said "yes" to attending Pot Pouri (Women's Federated Clubs)
6485088
date: May 12, 2014 12:30PM
location: 551 Willow Court, Glenwood, MN, The United States
description: After advancing his argument for CASTING NORMA JEANE as unique among the more than 1000 other books already published about Marilyn Monroe, the author will read a chapter and answer questions.
James rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Framley Parsonage by Anthony Trollope
Framley Parsonage
by Anthony Trollope
read in April, 2013
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My only reason for not giving five stars to this fourth novel of Trollope's six Barsetshire Chronicles -- is because there's nothing positively spectacular about Framley Parsonage to place it right up there with Barchester Towers, boasting as the lat ...more
" To get back to the question of why Shakespeare wrote As You Like It, of course the first answer would be in order to entertain as many admission-payin ...more "
" Format required I choose one book, and this one came closest to the subject as a whole. Plus maybe I'm late and Downton Abbey has already been exhaust ...more "
James rated a book 5 of 5 stars
As You Like It by William Shakespeare
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Even if you're one who, like me, can't truthfully say you ever find Shakespeare an easy first-time read – here's a way you can make sheer joy out of As You Like It. First, accept that the Bard's plays weren't meant primarily to be read at all. Rather ...more
James rated a book 5 of 5 stars
Across Spoon River by Edgar Lee Masters
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During most of my reading of this 1936 autobiography, I forgot all about why I'd sought it out in the first place -- which was because I'd wanted to find out everything I could about the making of Edgar Lee Masters' brilliant and deathless work of fr ...more
More of James's books…
“All that day we went about stunned – we, the small town of real people behind the corporate logo of a ringed blue planet spinning through starry space. In the studio's Corner Store, in small groups that met on the company streets and in a hundred offices, we pieced our own experiences together with what was coming to light in the media. The suspect: a deranged, 43-year-old drifter who two days earlier had allegedly killed three people in Albuquerque, NM. He had fled to California where for reasons unknown he had been trying to contact actor-producer Michael Landon on the day of the shootings. The employees he had approached had repeatedly turned him away, since Landon had no particular connection with our studio. But just after dark the man had come back to the main gate again. He had walked up to a young actress waiting for her ride after an audition, said "hello" to her and then stepped over to the guardhouse.
"I heard a shot and looked up," a secretary who had been passing nearby told me. "I saw Jeren fall and heard him groan. And there was this guy in a gray jacket just standing over him, pointing down at him with a gun. Then he raised the gun and pointed it at the other guard and shot again, and I saw Armando fall out the other side of the guardhouse. For a split second – just because we're at a movie studio – I thought it must be a movie they were filming. But there weren't any lights or cameras, and I realized it was real, and I thought, ‘He's gonna come after us because we saw it!' So I ran. I felt I was running for my life.”
James Glaeg

“I have often perplexed myself over what I saw in Nelle Snyder's aged face at that moment. It was no look of paranoia. It was a look of waiting. Perpetual waiting. That look was to come back to me sixteen years later when I heard Rose's narration at the end of James Cameron's Titanic, with its line about survivors "waiting for an absolution that never came." Yet the waiting I saw in Nelle Snyder's face seemed larger even than a waiting for absolution. It seemed vaster even than Titanic herself. Call it the waiting of the Mother of all Perished Vessels. Or of a Ship of Honeymoon Dreams perchance, with a passenger list spanning all humanity, that once proudly sailed but was lost, aeons ago, and sank to a dark, unreachable abode where nothing whatsoever can be grasped about her except her perplexing power still to haunt us.”
James Glaeg

“The door of the jail being flung open, the young woman stood fully revealed before the crowd. It seemed to be her first impulse to clasp the infant closely to her bosom that she might conceal a certain token which was wrought or fastened to her dress. In a moment, however, wisely judging that one token of her shame would but poorly serve to hide another, she took the baby on her arm, and, with a burning blush and yet a haughty smile, looked around at her townspeople and neighbors. On the breast of her gown, in fine red cloth, surrounded with an elaborate embroidery and fantastic flourishes of gold thread, appeared the letter A.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

“I cannot express it; but surely you and everybody have a notion that there is or should be an existence of yours beyond you. My great miseries in this world have been Heathcliff's miseries, and I watched and felt each from the beginning; my great thought in living is himself. Nelly, I AM Heathcliff--he's always, always in my mind--not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself--but as my own being.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

“All that day we went about stunned – we, the small town of real people behind the corporate logo of a ringed blue planet spinning through starry space. In the studio's Corner Store, in small groups that met on the company streets and in a hundred offices, we pieced our own experiences together with what was coming to light in the media. The suspect: a deranged, 43-year-old drifter who two days earlier had allegedly killed three people in Albuquerque, NM. He had fled to California where for reasons unknown he had been trying to contact actor-producer Michael Landon on the day of the shootings. The employees he had approached had repeatedly turned him away, since Landon had no particular connection with our studio. But just after dark the man had come back to the main gate again. He had walked up to a young actress waiting for her ride after an audition, said "hello" to her and then stepped over to the guardhouse.
"I heard a shot and looked up," a secretary who had been passing nearby told me. "I saw Jeren fall and heard him groan. And there was this guy in a gray jacket just standing over him, pointing down at him with a gun. Then he raised the gun and pointed it at the other guard and shot again, and I saw Armando fall out the other side of the guardhouse. For a split second – just because we're at a movie studio – I thought it must be a movie they were filming. But there weren't any lights or cameras, and I realized it was real, and I thought, ‘He's gonna come after us because we saw it!' So I ran. I felt I was running for my life.”
James Glaeg

“I have often perplexed myself over what I saw in Nelle Snyder's aged face at that moment. It was no look of paranoia. It was a look of waiting. Perpetual waiting. That look was to come back to me sixteen years later when I heard Rose's narration at the end of James Cameron's Titanic, with its line about survivors "waiting for an absolution that never came." Yet the waiting I saw in Nelle Snyder's face seemed larger even than a waiting for absolution. It seemed vaster even than Titanic herself. Call it the waiting of the Mother of all Perished Vessels. Or of a Ship of Honeymoon Dreams perchance, with a passenger list spanning all humanity, that once proudly sailed but was lost, aeons ago, and sank to a dark, unreachable abode where nothing whatsoever can be grasped about her except her perplexing power still to haunt us.”
James Glaeg

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