John Thomas Allen

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John Thomas Allen

Goodreads Author


Born
in Albany, The United States
February 26, 1983

Genre

Influences
lots and lots of writers

Member Since
August 2011


"Songs of the Shattered World: The Broken Hymns of Hastur" is a collection of Decadent poetry by figures like Eric Basso, Kristin Prevallet, John Yau, Leigh Blackmore and others.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...


This book is an attempt by myself and the contributors in our "Yellow" group to take the "Yellow King" out of the "Mythos" box and restore Robert W. Chambers' to his roots; the literary "movement" referred to as "Decadent". The author, Robert W. Chambers, knew titanic figures like Oscar Wilde, the deranged Maurice Rollinat, and many others in his own time. This made a huge impact on him, thus "the King In Yellow", a diseased spirit of madness and self destruction. To our mind this has less to do with weird fiction than a coupl
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John Thomas Allen I wasn't aware my introduction was online, so I can't speak to that. When I use the term "Logos of Surrealism" in the book I make a reference to the…moreI wasn't aware my introduction was online, so I can't speak to that. When I use the term "Logos of Surrealism" in the book I make a reference to the overarching occult ambience that Surrealism contains. It is difficult to describe without getting wishy washy, but it certainly is present: all surrealists--Charles Henri Ford, Andrew Joron, and here I would encourage any enthusiast of Surrealism to take a look at the scholarly work of Ferdinand Alquie in his "Philosophy of Surrealism" or Celia Rabinovitch's unfairly lauded study "Surrealism and the Sacred"--an Imaginal House that has a similar consistency when one gets down to it. A truth of imaginative freedom--something like Prometheus' truth.(less)
John Thomas Allen I had Lyme Disease, which made my brain function in strange ways. It's an epidemic no one cares about.
Average rating: 4.65 · 43 ratings · 15 reviews · 7 distinct works · Similar authors
Nouveau's Midnight Sun: Tra...

4.75 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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The Other Guy

4.92 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 2012
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Lumière

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2014
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Temptation

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The Lighthouse Above the Gr...

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The Horror Zine: Summer 2015

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3.75 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2015
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Spectral Realms No. 4

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More books by John Thomas Allen…
A collection of decadent poetry as seen through the eyes of Robert W. Chambers "Yellow King". The poetry of Kristin Prevallet, Eric Basso, Don Webb, Jason V Brock, Leigh Blackmore, Christina Zawadiwsky, and other inhabitants of Carcosa combine.
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Published on August 09, 2016 19:40 • 50 views

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Dark Matter by Aase Berg
"Probably a four-star work, there are some wonderful things being done with language here; however, for whatever reason the poem overall left me rather cold."
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Entry In An Unknown Hand by Franz Wright
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Selected Works by Konrad Bayer
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Someone Else's Wedding Vows by Bianca Stone
Someone Else's Wedding Vows
by Bianca Stone
read in November, 2015
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Poet Bianca Stone is certainly at the height of her powers in this collection, with probably 3 poems that actually constitute as great and almost great. Most of her poems are existential reflections with meditations on romance, the one seamlessly flo ...more
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Disorders of Magnitude by Jason V. Brock
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The After Party by Jana Prikryl
The After Party: Poems
by Jana Prikryl
read in April, 2016
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These are poems that form small continents of the impossible. Rather than relying on hand wringing or confessionalism, it blends every together into a few psychic increments and forms a calliope of every color.

To Tell of Bodies Changed Related Poem C
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The After Party by Jana Prikryl
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The Missing Museum by Amy King
The Missing Museum
by Amy King (Goodreads Author)
read in March, 2016
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2.0 out of 5 stars Two and a half stars, December 9, 2016
By J from NY
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This review is from: The Missing Museum (Paperback)
I got an early copy of this, and just saw Mrs. King is releasing a new collection.

This is a pretty good co
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More of John's books…
“Our current contempt for poverty stems from information overload--this is the enabler---our over education as privileged people-- perhaps the real culprit--and our secret assurance that we ourselves owe no one anything beyond the exhausting daily round. We will defend our lack of idealism to anyone and be horrifyingly well received in this age. Indeed, many so called financial "philosophies" are in fact nothing more than elaborate justification for one petty selfishness after the next.”
John Thomas Allen

“Our fascination with the outlaw, the killer, the meth dealer, is emblematic of a pretty embarrassing problem: we trim the fat of evil. We size it up, add a glitter to it never present in reality, and make it pretty for the cameras. It looks more boring and crude than anything else, so we give it a tummy tuck.”
John Thomas Allen

“A poet has to be a bit childlike at heart, and in that sense all the romantic stereotypes about poets being "eternal children", etc, are all accurate. They believe, whatever they may say, that art and words can change the world.”
John Thomas Allen

“All futurity wears the head of an insect.”
Andrew Joron

“Have you ever had one of those moments when you look up and realize that you're one of those people you see on the train talking to themselves?”
Marc Maron

“I think... if it is true that
there are as many minds as there
are heads, then there are as many
kinds of love as there are hearts.”
Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

“The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries abandoned the idea of spiritual or intellectual happiness in order to have this material happiness, consisting of a certain number of essential consumer goods. And hence, in the nineteenth century, happiness was linked to a well-being obtained by mechanical means, industrial means, production. The new thing that Saint-Just spoke about was that, in the past, happiness could appear as a very vague, very distant prospect for humanity, whereas now, people seemed to be within reach of the concrete, material possibility of attaining it. That was why happiness was to become an absolutely essential image for the nineteenth-century bourgeoisie, and for modern society. Happiness was attainable thanks to industrial development, and this image of happiness brought us fully into the consumer society.”
Jacques Ellul, Perspectives on Our Age

“He thought of the telescreen with its never-sleeping ear. They could spy upon you night and day, but if you kept your head you could still outwit them. With all their cleverness they had never mastered the secret of finding out what another human being was thinking. . . . Facts, at any rate, could not be kept hidden. They could be tracked down by inquiry, they could be squeezed out of you by torture. But if the object was not to stay alive but to stay human, what difference did it ultimately make? They could not alter your feelings; for that matter you could not alter them yourself, even if you wanted to. They could lay bare in the utmost detail everything that you had done or said or thought; but the inner heart, whose workings were mysterious even to yourself, remained impregnable.”
George Orwell, 1984
tags: 1984

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