Katherine Bouton




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Katherine Bouton

Goodreads Author


Born
in Bronxville, New York , The United States
Website

Twitter

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Influences
Andrew Solomon's "The Noonday Demon" was the model that inspired me to ...more

Member Since
December 2012


Katherine Bouton was an editor at The New York Times for 22 years before her progressive hearing loss made it too difficult to continue to work in a newsroom.
Confronted with involuntary early retirement, she returned to her first love and earlier career, writing. The result was her book "Shouting Won't Help: Why I -- and 50 Million Other Americans -- Can't Hear You," published to critical acclaim and a great deal of media interest in February 2013.
Hearing loss is a hidden disability and one that people are reluctant to acknowledge. Her book prompted many to open up about their own hearing loss.
She is a frequent speaker at hearing loss organizations, talking about the arc of her own hearing loss experience: from despair and anger to accepta
...more

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Katherine Bouton Exercise. Go to the gym and run on the treadmill. Go out for a long fast walk (if you have a dog you'll be accomplishing two things at one). Don't…moreExercise. Go to the gym and run on the treadmill. Go out for a long fast walk (if you have a dog you'll be accomplishing two things at one). Don't listen to music or books. Just let your mind float.
For me, it almost feels as if I'm getting fresh blood to the brain -- oxygen that allows me to think more clearly. (less)
Katherine Bouton Seeing your name in print is pretty great. Producing a work that's all your own is gratifying. Sharing information that fascinates you is fun.
For me,…more
Seeing your name in print is pretty great. Producing a work that's all your own is gratifying. Sharing information that fascinates you is fun.
For me, sharing my own difficulties in a way that may help others is truly gratifying. (less)
Average rating: 3.65 · 355 ratings · 97 reviews · 4 distinct works · Similar authors
Shouting Won't Help: Why I-...

3.62 avg rating — 345 ratings — published 2013 — 6 editions
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Living Better with Hearing ...

4.50 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2015 — 2 editions
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Living Better with Hearing ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2015
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Music to your Ears: hearing...

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* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

I didn't even know this blog existed. If you'd like to read my active blog go to katherinebouton.com



DECEMBER 12, 2014
Dogs and Us

Dog at rest.
Dogs go deaf, just like we do. But this isn’t about doggie deafness.

It’s basically a link to a lovely article by David Dudley titled “What Our Dogs Teach Us About Aging” from the AARP magazine.

Here’s the takeaway:

“Eat the best food you can afford. Go fo... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on December 15, 2014 09:15 • 45 views

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Exit West by Mohsin Hamid
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The Story of the Lost Child by Elena Ferrante
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NeuroTribes by Steve Silberman
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NeuroTribes by Steve Silberman
" I picked this book up after looking at it for months. Shouldn't have waited. Fascinating study of the rise of autism as a diagnosis and the dual roles ...more "
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When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi
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Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver
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More of Katherine's books…
“People with hearing loss are hard to live with. For one thing, they’re always telling you how to talk to them. Here are some tips. • Look at them when you speak—almost all hearing-impaired people read lips. Don’t lean into their ear when you talk—they need to see your lips. • Speak in a normal voice and articulate as clearly as possible. Shouting won’t help. Sylvia, the character in Nina Raine’s play Tribes who is going deaf, describes the efforts of the well-intentioned but badly informed: “People yelling in your ear however much you explain, so you literally have to grab their face and stick it in front of you.” • If the hearing-impaired person says “What?” or “Sorry?” don’t simply repeat what you’ve just said. Rephrase it. • If they don’t hear what you’ve said after you’ve repeated it two or three times, don’t say, “Never mind, it doesn’t matter.” To the person who can’t hear it, everything matters. • If you’re in a room with a bright window or bright lights, allow the hearing-impaired person to sit with their back to the light (for lipreading). • Most hearing-impaired people will have a very hard time distinguishing speech over a noisy air conditioner, a humming fish tank, a fan, or anything that whirs or murmurs or rumbles. Don’t try to talk to them when the TV is on, and turn off the background music when they come to visit. • Don’t talk to a hearing-impaired person unless you have their full attention. A hearing-impaired person can’t cook and hear at the same time, no matter how collegial it may seem to join her in the kitchen. • If you’re part of a small group, speak one at a time. At a dinner party or book group, where there may be eight or ten people present, try to have one general conversation, instead of several overlapping small ones. • If you’re at an event—a performance or a church service or a big meeting—give the hearing-impaired person a few moments after the event is over to readjust their hearing—either mentally or manually (changing the program on a hearing aid, for instance). • Never lean into a hearing-impaired person’s ear and whisper in the middle of a performance. They can’t hear you!”
Katherine Bouton, Shouting Won't Help: Why I--and 50 Million Other Americans--Can't Hear You

“Jay Alan Zimmerman, a composer, turned his hearing loss into the material for Jay Alan Zimmerman’s Incredibly Deaf Musical, a spirited autobiographical account of his adult-onset hearing loss.”
Katherine Bouton, Shouting Won't Help: Why I--and 50 Million Other Americans--Can't Hear You

“Where is the Steve Jobs of hearing loss?”
Katherine Bouton, Shouting Won't Help: Why I--and 50 Million Other Americans--Can't Hear You




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