H.S. Cooper's Blog

June 22, 2016

Photo by HS. Cooper ©

It was a beautiful summer day to take a drive along the Gulf of Mexico!

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Published on June 22, 2016 14:18 • 1 view

June 6, 2016

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Published on June 06, 2016 10:08 • 2 views

June 5, 2016

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Published on June 05, 2016 08:55 • 2 views

May 26, 2016

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Memorial Day Weekend is… HERE! And that means it is officially camping season. So if you haven’t already dusted off the camping gear, packed the RV or made cabin reservations at your favorite park… you are a little late. But don’t fret! Some parks still have openings for the holiday weekend – just call ahead and check on their availability.


No matter where you are spending this holiday weekend, please have a safe one and remember those who have fought (and still are fighting) for our freedom.


NOTE: M ake a flag for your campsite this holiday:


https://hscooper.wordpress.com/articles/rotating-pvc-pipe-flag-poles/


https://hscooper.wordpress.com/articles/smaller-flags-for-rv-parks/

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Published on May 26, 2016 09:58 • 2 views

May 7, 2016

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

It was a beautiful day at the Gulf Coast Hot Air Balloon Festival (Foley, AL). 



Photo by H.S. Cooper ©
Photo by H.S. Cooper ©
Photo by H.S. Cooper ©
Photo by H.S. Cooper ©
Photo by H.S. Cooper ©
Photo by H.S. Cooper ©
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Published on May 07, 2016 14:31 • 4 views

April 27, 2016

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

We ran into some rain this morning on the roadways. Glad to be “home” inside the rig now and not have to worry about traveling during a storm. We’d watch the Weather Channel, but this park doesn’t have cable TV… thankfully we can rely on the NOAA weather radio for severe weather alerts.


All RVers should invest in a NOAA weather alert radio. A nice handheld radio with wall adapter and back-up batteries can be purchased for around $20-30 and in case a storm Watch or Warning is issued, you will have the latest information.


With storm season upon us, it is a good reminder to be prepared!

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Published on April 27, 2016 13:46 • 2 views

April 26, 2016

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Published on April 26, 2016 15:53 • 2 views

April 21, 2016

Photo by H.S. Cooper © BLUE RIDGE PKWY

Been too busy to participate in National Park week? Don’t worry, there is still plenty going on at your local National Park Service this weekend! In addition to waiving park entrance fees, the park service has some other events going on. Click on the links below to find out more information on how you can participate.


April 22nd Earth Day


April 23rd National Park Instameet


April 24th Park Rx Day


 


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Published on April 21, 2016 10:31 • 2 views

April 18, 2016

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

The third book in my Campground Mystery series, Dying to Work Camp, is now available in larger print at Amazon. The story takes place in the State of Washington during the apple harvest where a handful of “working campers” help an orchard owner pick apples.


Although I don’t get into as much trouble as my main character, I must confess that being a Full-Time RVer is just as exciting. The idea behind this mystery came to me while touring an apple processing plant during the harvest season. The tour guide was discussing the latest imaging technology, while I was thinking, “What a great place for a murder!”


We were fortunate to explore the area and visit an apple orchard during the harvest. The photo above was taken at the edge of the orchard – where the property dropped into a steep bank and below was a deep lake. Until we heard the train, we hadn’t even noticed the tracks below!


It was certainly a memorable visit – from the farming community of Quincy to the surreal drive to the city of Wenatchee – the “Apple Capital of the World”. Beyond Wenatchee are peaks and mountains that lead to the “Bavarian Village” of Leavenworth.


Fortunately, we didn’t end-up battered, bruised and bin-deep in murder as my main character did!

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Published on April 18, 2016 15:04 • 1 view

April 10, 2016

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©

Photo by H.S. Cooper ©


After ten years of Full-Time RVing, we have encountered our share of bad parks. Every unpleasant experience puts a giant X on their park listing in our campground directory and earns the offending park an unfavorable online review.


Sometimes the problem is simply the park’s location. Like the one in Texas that bragged on being the place to get plenty of rest, only it didn’t indicate in the ad that you had to sleep during the day because the campground was located beside railroad tracks that were active at night. We were also lured in to one park in Mississippi that promised Southern charm, only the appeal wore off as soon as we realized we were at the end of an airport runway. Although one of the worst locations we’ve stumbled upon was in Florida. A small, seemingly quiet park appeared to be a good place for a few nights’ rest. The first night was so peaceful we actually considered extending our stay a few more days. Luckily we didn’t because that evening we were awakened to some bone-shaking music until the wee hours of the morning. We were unaware that the backside of the park bordered a nightclub that had been closed the previous evening!


Even if the location is ideal, sometimes it is the condition of the park that affects your stay. Usually the offender is meager Wi-Fi or poor cable TV. We’ve certainly had our share of that and while it is no problem for a night or two, issues with this during an extended stay reflect poorly in our online reviews. These are generally simple fixes and if nothing is done to correct the problem it indicates poor management. A few years ago we overnighted at a park in Florida that offered a Wi-Fi “hotspot”. When asked at check-in, we were told that it was under a tree in the middle of the RV park! Another problem we occasionally encounter is water pressure, albeit that it is normally too high. Imagine our surprise when we stayed at a park in Pennsylvania that had the water pressure at twenty. However, the management insisted that such a low number was safe!


Though sometimes it is the staff members who make you feel unwelcomed. Like the time we pulled into a park in Maryland and found the office closed and no after-hours check-in board. As we started to leave a staff member appeared on a golf-cart and started screaming at us that we were going to jackknife as we swung the rig around to exit. She literally kept screaming “jackknife” over and over. In reflection, I wish I would have taken a video of the maniac screaming at us – that would have gone viral! And the time we stopped at a campground in Virginia and politely asked the clerk for a Big Rig pull-thru for the night. She said people like us needed to “just go to a truck stop” – so we did! And lest we forget the park we overnighted at in Arkansas. The cable TV didn’t work and we immediately reported it to the office since we were being charged additional for it. A work-camper came over to our site, never even looked at the frayed cable at the pedestal. He just said, “I don’t think you need it tonight” and left!


Occasionally it is the park guests who bring about an unfavorable stay. Clearly it is hard to be quiet when your slides are on-top of each other in some of the older parks. However, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try to be a good neighbor. Like the time we were staying in Washington and the woman camped beside us wanted to know what antenna TV channels we got. Instead of coming over to our site and knocking on our door, she opened her slide-window, took a cane and pounded on our door. Imagine our surprise when we answered the door to see a cane poking out a window at us! Or the folks in Virginia who parked their golf cart under our master bedroom slide because they were, well, frankly, morons. And don’t get me started on the park in Texas where the neighbors built a Tiki bar on their site. By the third day the “bar” included a large flat screen TV, karaoke machine and additional seating. They expanded beyond their tow vehicle space and then started parking on our campsite. It was senseless to complain as we saw the park manager had become a patron of the bar! We found another park for the remainder of our stay in the area.


From dry camps to high-end RV resorts – we certainly have had some memorable reviews! After all these years, we have learned to take the bad with the good. Thankfully with so many online review sites, we have a way of warning other travelers. So don’t be shy about taking recourse by writing reviews. And, remember, if you visit a RV park in Maryland and a maniac starts screaming at you – get it on video!

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Published on April 10, 2016 14:49 • 1 view